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Course Descriptions

HISTORY (HIS)

HIS101 - Western Civilization I Credits: 3
This course is a survey of the main stages of the history of western civilization up to the beginning of the 17th Century. It emphasizes the concepts, forces, ideas, events and people that shaped the complex dimensions of the contemporary world. After a brief consideration of the earliest civilization phase, the course explores the classical period, from about 1000 B.C.E. to 500 C.E., the spread of civilization period, 500 to 1400 C.E., and the spread of the Renaissance and Reformation.

HIS102 - Western Civilization II Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of History of Civilization I beginning with the 18th century. It, too, emphasizes the concepts, ideas, events and people that shaped the complex dimensions of the contemporary world. It begins with a consideration of the forces influencing the West's dominance of the globe between 1700 and 1900. It concludes with analysis of the 20th century as each major civilization confronts the forces of modernity.

HIS110 - Introduction to African-American History Credits: 3
This course will examine the history, leadership, trials and triumphs of African-Americans. It begins with the earliest Africans brought to America as slaves, and studies the main themes affecting the lives of African-Americans, emphasizing economic and social trends as well as the various class structures and gender differences. Special consideration will be given to the rise and growth of slavery and segregation, the Civil Rights Movement and on some of the primary African-Americans in history.

HIS190 - Research Methods Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to research methods for students enrolled in the history concentration or social studies education program. Students will learn how to identify and evaluate primary sources, distinguish the differences between primary and secondary sources, formulate a thesis with a historical context, understand historiography, properly cite sources used and present their findings in a classroom environment. Special emphasis will be placed on a range of primary and secondary sources, including written documents, photographs, quantitative data and material culture. Class sessions will include powerpoint lectures, visits to special collections and research libraries, workshops on research and writing, and student presentation of their research findings.

Pre requisites: 9 credits from HIS-101, HIS-102, HIS-201, HIS-202

Co requisites: 3 credits from HIS-101, HIS-102, HIS-201, HIS-202

HIS201 - American History to 1865 Credits: 3
The development of the United States from the period of discovery and colonization to the end of the Civil War, with attention to the most important political, economic, social, and cultural forces.

HIS202 - American History Since 1865 Credits: 3
The development of the United States from the Reconstruction Era to the present; emphasis is given to late nineteenth and twentieth century industrialization, the expansion of government, the emergence of the industrial-urban society and America's status as a world power.

HIS205 - American Civil War Credits: 3
In this course, attention will be concentrated on the period before, during, and after the American Civil War. It is designed to do justice to all the important aspects of this particular period . . . political, economic, constitutional, diplomatic, social, religious, artistic, and intellectual.

HIS210 - History of Pennsylvania Credits: 3
This is a required course for all social studies education majors. The course provides an in-depth exploration of the history of Pennsylvania and its particularrole in the political, economic and social development of the United States. It also introduces students to pedagogy or methods of teaching Pennsylvania History at the primary and secondary levels. Topics will include William Penn's establishment of the colony, the French-Indian War, and the central role Pennsylvania played in such national events as the American Revolution, the Early Republic, Antebellum reform and the Industrial Revolution. Special emphasis will be placed onconflict and cooperation between different cultures; continuity and change over time; and cause-and-effect relationships between economic, political and social events. Class sessions will include powerpoint lectures, documentary films, living history presentations, simulation exercises and workshops on research and writing.

HIS231 - Luzerne County History Credits: 3
This course deals with the history of Luzerne County in the lower northeastern section of Pennsylvania. The course begins with a consideration of important definitions, themes, and methods of 'Local History' as a field of study. It continues with an overview of various geographic and geologic characteristics of the County and their influence on the County's historic development. Most of the course is an examination and analysis of major events, persons, ideas, institutions, and trends which produced the foundations of the modern Luzerne County community. Chronologically the course covers the period from the 17th century to the late 20th century. Some major topics considered are: the early settlement patterns and the formation of the new county in 1786 and the evolution of the current county boundaries in the 19th century; the Revolutionary War era and the County's role in the war; early political, economic, and social characteristics; the 19th century transformation and growth; the rise and decline of the anthracite coal industry; ethnic diversity; cultural development; the political kaleidoscope of the 19th and 20th centuries; economic depression; the trials and tribulations of economic diversification; and the recent metamorphosis of the County.

HIS238 - World War II Credits: 3
This course intends to provide an insight into the causes of World War II, principle events and key individuals that were the focus of the Conflict and the results upon an entire generation of Americans who either participated, supported or were part of America's involvement. We will examine images of what has been called "Total War" that was brought home in stark reality to Americans the true meaning of Terror, Fascism, and Mass Murder on a scale hitherto, unimaginable. You will examine the results that have had a lingering effect on America's perspective of its economic, political, and military involvement in various parts of the World as a result of this global conflict and its lingering effects on the rest of the century.

HIS240 - The Holocaust Credits: 3
An examination of one of the most overwhelming events in human history; the systematic murder by the Nazis of six million European Jews, murdered solely because of their ethnic identity.

HIS245 - The Anciet Regime and the French Revolution Credits: 3
This course is an analysis of the events leading up the French Revolution, a study of the events and philosophy of the Revolution itself, and the aftermath of the Napoleonic era. It emphasizes the concepts, forces, ideas, events and people that shaped France in the 18th Century, as well as the Napoleonic era of the early 19th Century. It also explores the philosophical questions that arise from one of the most violent events of early modern Europe.

HIS252 - Women in American History Credits: 3
This course is a detail of the history of women in American including Native Americans, African-Americans, and immigrant women. It begins with the earliest colonizers and settlers, and studies the main themes affecting the lives of American women, emphasizing economic and social trends and patterns as well as the various class structures. It will also focus on some of the primary women in American history, including many who have shaped the many womenís movements.

HIS258 - Introduction to Asian History Credits: 3
This course provides an introductory survey of the modern history, economics, politics, and cultures of the Pacific Basinregion. This inter-disciplinary Asian-studies course explores how the Pacific Basin has evolved to emerge as a principal political and economic center of the coming century.

HIS259 - Vietnam Credits: 3
Vietnam provides a full record of the conflict - from background on Vietnam and its people, through the French presence, to a chronology of the period from 1945 to 1975, with an examination of the impact of the war on American society in the years which followed. The series places Vietnam in the perspective of history and permits viewers to form their own conclusions about the basis for the conflict, what was won and lost, and by whom.

HIS260 - The Korean War Credits: 3
An examination of post World War II events that lead to the Cold War, and also the political, social, economic, and military developments that became The War in Korea: The Forgotten WAR, sometimes referred to, alternately, as The Korean Police Action which lasted from June 25th, 1950 to July 27th, 1953. The Korean War marked a turning point in twentieth-century history as the first shooting confrontation of the Cold War, and was the only time since the Second World War that two of the world's major military powers, the U.S. and China, have fought. It continues to be America's longest unresolved war.