Academics

Course Descriptions

ACC104 - Financial Accounting for the Hospitality Industry Credits: 3
Financial Accounting for the Hospitality Industry is designed to provide stu­dents with a proper merging of basic accounting theory and practice and is tailored to the special needs of the hospitality service industries. This course focuses on techniques, tools and procedures that are most applicable to the unique characteristics of hospitality firms such as hotels, restaurants and tourism and travel.

ACC111 - Principles of Accounting I Credits: 3
This course presents the accounting cycle covering both service and merchandising activities of a sole proprietorship. It also analyzes a business transaction froma journal entry through the preparation ofthe financial statements (income statement, statement of owner equity, and the balance sheet) to closing journal entries.The course includes but is not limited to,perpetual inventory, accounts and notes receivable, and accounting for plant andintangible assets.

ACC112 - Principles of Accounting II Credits: 3
The principles of accounting are continued from Principles of Accounting I with the major emphasis on accounting as related to corporations and manufacturing concerns. Topics include manufacturing systems and controls, liabilities, bonds, corporation equity, statement of cash flows and financial statement analysis.
Prerequisite: ACC 111.

ACC121 - Applications in Microcomputer Accounting Credits: 3
This is a comprehensive course in microcomputer accounting. Students will explore and use the many features of the latest version of QuickBooks, including recording transactions, ordering merchandise, preparing reports and compilingcharts.
Prerequisites: ACC 111, 112; CIS 110.

ACC211 - Intermediate Accounting I Credits: 3
This course presents the conceptual framework of accounting, accounting environment and information processing systems, financial statements and present and future value concepts. Emphasis is on the accounting for balance sheet content, including cash, receivables, inventories and plant assets.
Pre requisites: ACC-111, ACC-112

ACC212 - Intermediate Accounting II Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of in depth accounting started in Intermediate Accounting I ACC 211. Accounting calculation and presentation for intangible assets, current and long-term liabilities, stockholders? equity, dilutive securities, and earnings per share.
Pre requisites: ACC-211

ACC213 - Managerial Accounting Credits: 3
The student learns what kind of information is needed by managers, where this information can be obtained and how this information can be used in planning, control and decision making responsibilities. Study items include cost terms, behavior and systems design, planning and control, decision making and statement analysis. The course shows the importance of these cost items to the success of the business and the interpretation of costs needed by management in order to achieve desired results. Emphasis is on the use of accounting data internally by managers including application of cost accounting, budget planning, and accounting controls.
Prerequisites: ACC 111, 112; CIS 110.

ACC214 - Tax Accounting Credits: 3
The student learns United States tax laws pertaining to preparation of individual federal income tax returns and supporting schedules and forms. Emphasis is on a variety of individual taxation issues, researching federal tax code and current professional readings. The impact of taxes on decision-making is considered as well.
Prerequisites: ACC 111, ACC 112.

ACC215 - Cost Accounting Credits: 3
A study of many cost accounting concepts such as accumulation and measurement of direct and indirect costs as well as application of overhead. Other topics - how cost accounting is used for budgeting, decision making, interpret the computations, prepare reports for management. (Spring only)
Prerequisites: ACC 111 and 112.

ARC110 - Architectural Design Graphics I Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to the essential skills needed for design composition and communication specific to architecture, interior design and allied fields. The process of design and analysis will form the context for the development of visual communication competencies that include manual drafting, freehand drawing, conceptual diagramming, computer based graphics and presentation composition. Design vignettes of increasing complexity will provide learning experiences that reinforce application of a design process. Course content will include instruction and activities that introduce students to careers, collaborative work and studio culture.

ARC112 - Architectural Drafting I Credits: 3
The techniques of making architectural drawings are practiced by means of plans, elevations, and sections; attention is given to the individual trades such as plumbing, and electrical; each student will complete a set of plans for a light frame building using CAD software.
Prerequisite: ARC-110, ARC-120, CAD-101

ARC114 - Building Materials and Construction Processes Credits: 3
The study of basic construction materials and methods including wood, steel, concrete and masonry. Floor framing systems, heavy steel construction, footings, foundations, and water and dampproofing will be studied. Site visits to buildings under construction will supplement classroom learning.

ARC120 - Light-Frame Construction Credits: 3
ARC 120 Light-Frame Building Construction involves the study of basic construction materials and methods for light-frame construction. The integration of assemblies, concepts, and systems into the design and construction process will be studied. This will include floor framing systems, footings, foundations, wall and roof framing, water/damp proofing, sustainability, and building codes. There will be a special focus on the impact of design and construction on energy efficiency and the environment. Site visits to buildings under construction will supplement classroom learning.

ARC175 - Architectural Design Graphics II Credits: 3
Through a series of studio design exercises, architectural expression and visual literacy competencies acquired in Architectural Design Graphics I will be further developed using these and new skills including freehand drawing, manual drafting, model building, and computer aided modeling and rendering. Traditional graphic/rendering media such as watercolor, colored pencil, color marker, and charcoal will be applied to the practice of three dimensional graphics and model construction. A significant part of the course will be devoted to acquiring skill in computer-aided rendering, three dimensional modeling, and animation by the use of CAD and other software programs. These learning experiences will reinforce and enhance the student's ability to communicate design ideas, record the built environment, and solve design problems.
Prerequisite: ARC 110

ARC191 - Architectural History I Credits: 3
The Ancient to the Gothic Periods is a survey course covering the major public and private architectural monuments of the Ancient, Classical, and early European worlds. The principal focus will be on such topics as architectural style, function, patronage, and materials. The course will include study of how the philosophic, religious, political, and economic currents of the times have been recorded by the contemporary architectural works.

ARC192 - Architectural History II Credits: 3
The Renaissance to the Modern Periods is a continuation of ARC 191, but may also be taken independent of the first part. The periods covered begin with the early Renaissance in 1400 and continue through to the early Twentieth Century Modernism. The focus and study will be similar to those of ARC 191.

ARC205 - Architectural Design Fundamentals I Credits: 3
Introduction of basic two-dimensional and three-dimensional design concepts including the study of spatial and functional relationships in architectural design. Design of simple objects and buildings with emphasis on the design process itself. Projects will include simple conceptual studies, structural problems, functional problems involving anthropometrics and scale, and more comprehensive problems involving the design of habitable space and buildings.
Prerequisites: ARC 110, ARC 175 or permission of instructor.

ARC212 - Mechanical Equipment Credits: 3
The basic theories and applications concerned with building equipment; topics covered include the design and operating principles of heating systems, water supply, plumbing and drainage piping; single phase electrical wiring systems are studied and poly-phase systems are introduced.
Prerequisites: ARC 112, ARC 114 or permission of instructor.

ARC213 - Surveying Credits: 3
Introduction of surveying covering the skills and calculations used in laying out a plot and determining levels; field work will be used to learn the use of surveying equipment.
Prerequisites: ARC 112, MAT 111 or permission of instructor.

ARC215 - Structural Analysis I Credits: 3
The basic principles of Mechanics, Strength of Materials, and Theory of Structures relevant specifically to architectural design. Forces, moments, resultants, equilibrium conditions of force systems; the basics of stress-strain relationships, interpretations of physical test data, applications in the design of beams and columns.
Prerequisites: MAT 111, PHY 121, ARC 114 or permission of instructor.

ARC216 - Structural Analysis II Credits: 3
Includes the study of the stresses and strains that occur in bodies; stresses in riveted and welded joints, shear and bending diagrams, investigation and design of beams and deflection of beams; investigation of the design of simple steel and concrete beams; the digital computer is used as an aid in the solution of selected problems.
Prerequisites: ARC 112 and 215 or permission of instructor.

ARC219 - Estimating and Architectural Practice Credits: 3
Students will study and practice methods of building cost estimating and project scheduling from an architectural viewpoint. Contract documents in architecture; the relationship between the owner, architect and contractor; and the operation and coordination of the architectural firm will be studied.
Prerequisite: ARC-102
Co- requisite: ARC-220

ARC220 - Commercial Construction Credits: 3
ARC 220 Commercial Construction involves the study of basic materials and methods related to heavy frame buildings. A focus on life cycle cost and sustainability will be emphasized while studying material manufacture and building assemblies. Site visits to buildings under construction will supplement classroom learning.

ARC226 - Architectural Drafting II - Working Drawings for Commercial Construction Credits: 3
This course involves the production and coordination of architectural, mechanical, and structural systems with emphasis on commercial construction. Each student will prepare a drawings set of working drawings including architectural, mechanical and structural systems for a commercial building.
Prerequisites: ARC 112, ARC 114 or permission of instructor.

ARC230 - BIM Design Studio Credits: 3
BIM Design Studio introduces a Building Information Modeling program into the design development and presentation process. As a continuation of ARC 205 design problems will be more advanced and of a larger scope including a continued exploration of fundamental design concepts and architectural projects that involve site planning, building planning, and the integration of related technology into building design.
Prerequisite: ARC 205, CAD 101

ARC290 - Architectural Engineering Technology Practicum Credits: 0
As part of the Architectural Engineering Technology program students are required to participate in an industry-based experiential learning activity. The practicum consists of 120 hours of work in a professional setting. Students will gain exposure to the professional practice of architectural design, drafting, office practice, and project administration. In addition to documented attendance and active participation at the work site, students are required to complete periodic reports and compile a portfolio of work to document employment activities.
Prerequisites: CAD 101, ARC 110, ARC 114
Corequisites: ARC 112 or permission of the instructor

COM101 - Basic TV Production Credits: 4
Introduction to the basics - planning, equipment orientation, responsibilities of personnel, lighting, and camera operation, with basic 'hands on' exercises.

COM102 - Electronic Field Production Credits: 4
The purpose of this course is to consolidate the skills learned in the basic video production course with advanced production skills and techniques which will be applied to produce and direct professional programs through hands on experience in on-location assignments.
This course will consist of lectures, in-class discussions and video productions in the form of both class exercises, group projects and individual productions. Digital video cameras & non-linear digital editing software will be utilized for class work.
Prerequisite: COM 101.

COM104 - Introduction to Multimedia Technology Credits: 3
The purpose of this class is to provide substantive learning experiences for students in the acquisition, preparation, utilization, and distribution of computer generated multimedia. Design and digital authoring for various media applications will be examined, and hands-on experiences will be provided. The focus of the course is the design and preparation of standalone multimedia presentations for audio, video, internet, mobile and other new and emerging technologies.
Prerequisite: CIS-107.

COM105 - Writing for Audio, Video and the Web Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to give the student a firm foundation in media writing principles as they apply to audio, video and the internet. Various scriptwriting formats and styles will be explored for the instructional non-broadcast medium. The course consists of lectures, in-class discussions and pre-production steps required to successfully complete scripts in these areas. Exercises take the form of in-class exercises, group projects and individual productions in a theoretical setting.
Prerequisite: ENG-101

COM106 - Audio/Video Performance Credits: 3
COM106 is designed to give students the opportunity to develop character performance, on-air radio techniques and refining on-camera appearances through class lectures and lab exercises. It also provides opportunities for the student to discover broadcast career outlets, student understanding of the overall writing/producing/directing basics for both audio and video talent.

COM107 - Introduction to Digital Design Tools Credits: 3
This is an introduction industry standard applications/software used in the emerging world of digital media including print and web design, audio and video production and animation. Students will be introduced to various digital media out lets and current software utilized in the creation of media content. Students devel op a basic understanding of digital content as it relates to the industry applications/ software. Use of existing industry software augments and enhances student's own work.

COM111 - Copywriting for the Electronic Media Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a strong foundation in advertising and commercial copywriting as it applies to the electronic media. Through a theoretical and practical approach, students will be afforded the opportunity to examine the role electronic media plays in the marketing of goods and services, and the means by which audiences are influenced. The students will also gain a knowledge of preproduction, production and post-production as they relate to producing advertising copy for television, radio, the Internet and new and emerging technologies. The course consists of lectures, discussions and in-class exercises that will help the student to gain knowledge of the process required to take an electronic media-advertising project from concept to completion.

COM201 - Radio Production Credits: 4
Surveys of production of a wide variety of radio programs, including news, sports, drama, panels, etc. and the technical operations required for such programs - music, and sound effects, scripting, control room and studio equipment. Includes lab work in an on-air or production capacity on the College's radio station, WSFX-FM.
Prerequisite: COM 105.

COM203 - Electronic Journalism Credits: 4
This course is designed to train students in contemporary skills of reporting, shooting, editing, producing, and posting a great story to various forms of multimedia. Basic journalistic skills are stressed including research & interview techniques, information gathering and news writing. The course includes the instruction, hands-on training and independent learning exercises required to prepare the student to function effectively in a fast-paced, multimedia environment. All types of presentation structures will be stressed including hard and soft news packages, feature material, investigative reporting and human interest stories.
Prerequisite: COM-101, COM-102, COM-105
Co- requisite: COM-104

COM204 - Mass Media Management and Law Credits: 3
Examination of management principles and organizational structure of broadcast, non-broadcast and media facilities, and their application to policy issues, operations, and program content. Includes an overview of federal, state and local laws, and policies of regulatory and non-regulatory agencies which affect broadcast content and system ownership.

COM205 - Advanced Radio Production Credits: 3
Further advances the student's knowledge of radio/recording procedures, and provides information on skills required for the production of more complex audio programs. While the basic applications of radio production were discussed in COM 201, in this advanced course, the student will continue to the next step in the application of learned radio production techniques. Includes lab work in an on-air production capacity on the College's radio station, WSFX-FM.
Prerequisites: COM 105, COM 201.

COM207 - Professional Internship Credits: 6
A six-credit course in which the student will participate in a supervised on-the­job observation and work experience in a local media facility. Eligibility will be based on the student's departmental grade point average. Assignment will be made following evaluation of the student's grades, prior experience, and career objectives. Students will meet periodically with faculty members, will keep a running anecdotal history of his/her experience, along with a term paper placing those experiences in perspective.
Prerequisite: All COM/CIS courses, except COM 214.

COM209 - Special Project Workshop Credits: 6
An individual workshop involving a defined project area, to be determined by consultation with the instructor. Special Project workshop may be selected in lieu of an internship, or assigned to the student who may be ineligible for a professional internship. Topic will be selected following evaluation of the student's grades, prior experience and career objectives.
Prerequisite: All COM/CIS courses, except COM 214.

COM210 - Special Projects Workshop Credits: 3
This course may be selected as an elective for students who choose a professional internship, rather than the 6-credit special projects experience. The 3-credit hour elective focuses on an individual workshop involving a defined project area, but smaller in scope than the 6-credit workshop.
Prerequisite: COM 107.

COM214 - Graphic Production for Digital Media Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to establish a solid knowledge base in video production as it applies to the manipulation and creation of graphic images. The course will introduce the student to computer software and hardware that will enable them to produce professional graphics for video programs and multi-media presentations.
Prerequisite: CIS-107, COM-104

COM290 - Portfolio Credits: 1
The purpose of this course is to afford the potential graduate the opportunity to produce a portfolio that includes graphics, script writing samples and audio & video productions, thus aiding the student in obtaining employmeny in the various mass media fields that require their particular skill sets.
Prerequisite: 25 credits in COM courses
Co- requisite: COM-207 or COM-209; COM-214

AUT101 - Basic Electricity Credits: 3
In this course students will learn the basic principles of automotive electricty relating to starting and cranking systems. Emphasis will be on diagnosis and re­pair along with precautions when working with solid state components.

AUT103 - Automotive Fundamentals Credits: 3
In this course students will learn about opportunities within the automotive field relating to employment. Federal regulations regarding automotive shop safety and hazardous material will be covered along with basic engine operating prin­ciples using shop tools, measuring tools and the latest available service and repair information.

AUT105 - Brake Systems and Chassis Repair Credits: 3
This course will cover the principles of automotive brake and chassis systems. Students will learn the operation and skills needed to service and repair disc and drum friction assemblies, wheel cylinders and brake caliper hydraulics. Emphasis will be on troubleshooting and repair.

AUT106 - Steering and Suspension Systems Credits: 3
This course provides students with a theoretical study of steering and suspen­sion systems, with emphasis on the diagnosis, service and repair of suspension system components, steering linkage systems and basic alignment geometry.

AUT112 - Fuel Injection Systems Credits: 3
Theory related instruction on the function and operation of the following injection systems: Bosch, D.K.L. Jetronic and General Motors Throttle Body Fuel Injection Systems. Emphasis will be on operation, troubleshooting, service and repair of these systems.
Prerequisites: AUT 101, 104.

AUT114 - Diesel Fundamentals Credits: 3
An introductory course to present the basic operating principles of the diesel engine. Emphasis will be placed on fuel delivery systems and logical troubleshooting and maintenance procedures.

AUT115 - Diesel Specialization Credits: 3
A theoretical study of specialized diesel components with emphasis on injection pumps, governors and fuel injector systems, dynamic timing, injector nozzle cleaning, troubleshooting, service and repair.

AUT117 - Specialized Electronics Training Credits: 3
This introductory course will cover the principles of automotive electronics and automotive electrical systems. It will provide the student with theoretical and practical experiences necessary to fully understand the tools, equipment and measurements necessary for future study in the automotive field.

AUT124 - Cylinder Head Rebuilding Credits: 3
This course will provide the student with the correct service procedures and specifications for the reconditioning of aluminum and cast iron cylinder heads.

AUT130 - Rear Axle and Manual Transmission Drive Line Credits: 3
This course covers operation, diagnosis and overhaul of all current all-wheel drive and four wheel drive transfer cases to include borg-warner 4472 (awd) and the new process 231/241 and the 233/243 electric shift transfer cases. Also included is the automatic 4wd transfer case.

AUT208 - Basic Auto Transmission Credits: 3
Theory related instruction to provide students with the principles and basic concepts of planetary gear sets, fluid couplings, hydraulic control and pressure regulations. Presentation will include detailed descriptions of transmission service and diagnosis of valve body overhaul, and complete transmission overhaul and repair.

AUT209 - Power Plant Overhaul Theory Credits: 3
Theory related instruction and procedures necessary to completely rebuild an automotive engine with emphasis placed on restoring of tolerances and machining of engine components.

AUT210 - Heating & Air Conditioning Theory Credits: 3
Theory related instruction in the function and operatin of automotive heating and air conditioning systems with emphasis placed on diagnosis, service, and repair of these systems.

AUT211 - Advanced Automatic Transmissions Credits: 3
Theory related instruction to provide students with the principles and basic concept of front wheel drive transmissions. Emphasis will be placed on operation, construction, diagnosis, overhaul, and on car service and adjustments of the transaxle and converter clutch.
Prerequisites: AUT 101, AUT 208.

AUT220 - Electronic Fuel Injection Drivability Credits: 3
This course will cover drivability-type problems related to GM, Ford, Daimlerchrysler, and imports to include troubleshooting and repair of these systems.
Prerequisites: AUT 101, 112, 117.

AUT228 - Chassis Body Electrical Credits: 3
This course is designed for the advance automotive student with a strong basic electrical background. In this course students will learn the operation and proper diagnostic procedures for domestic and import restraint systems, door and window controls, instrumentation and windshield wiper systems using strategy based diagnosis.
Prerequisites: AUT 101, AUT 117

AVI101 - Aeronautical Knowledge I Credits: 4
This course is designed to provide the student with basic knowledge pertaining to visual flight in the national airspace system. This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge pertaining to the basic principles of flight, aviation weather, air traffic control, and navigating procedures in preparation for the FAA private pilot aeronautical knowledge exam.
Corequisite: AVI 209.

AVI103 - Aeronautical Knowledge II Credits: 3
A detailed study of topics treated only superficially in the introductory course (Aeronautical Knowledge I). The student will apply learned language to the proce­dures used by air traffic controllers & pilots, and will study in depth the operators principles of navigational equipment and services available to system users.
Prerequisite: AVI 101 or instructor permission.

AVI107 - Air Transportation (optional) Credits: 3
This course is designed to give the student a well rounded view of the air transportation system. Topics to be covered are, the heritage of flight, the avia­tion environment, aerospace system vehicles, the community of aviation and the future of advanced aerospace systems.

AVI109 - Instrument Flight Theory Credits: 3
This is an advanced theory course relative to the principles of instrumental flight. The student upon completion will have adequate knowledge to pass the FAA writ­ten examination for Instrument Rating.

AVI201 - Federal Aviation Regulations/Aviation Law Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide the student with the principles of law as applied to business with emphasis on the aviation industry. There will be a de­tailed study on the Federal Aviation Regulations.

AVI204 - Aviation Operations Management (optional) Credits: 3
This course is to provide the student with knowledge about the Aviation/ Aero­space Management function. Topics that shall be addressed are, facilities planning, certification requirements, funding processes, personnel development, training, communications, security/safety programs, and small business operations includ­ing both fixed base operations and private corporate operations.

AVI205 - Commercial Pilot Theory Credits: 3
This is an advanced theory course relative to the principles of commercial avia­tion. The student upon completion will have adequate knowledge to pass the FAA written examination for Commercial Pilot Certificate.

AVI207 - Multi-Engine Flight Theory (optional) Credits: 3
This is an advanced theory course relative to the principles of multi-engined flight. This course will include principles of aircraft structures and power plants. The student upon completion will have the adequate knowledge for Multi-engine Rating.

AVI209 - Aviation Weather Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide the student with the elements of meteorol­ogy which affect aviation. Topics of the course will include air masses, hazardous aviation weather elements, clouds, temperature, pressure, fronts and the analysis of weather data for safe flying.

AVI211 - Aerodynamics Credits: 3
This course will provide the student with principles of the physics of flight, including the application of airfoils and related criteria.

AVI213 - Physiology/Psychology of Flight Credits: 3
This course will study the physical and psychological factors affecting flying personnel. Some elements of study will be hyposia, hyperventilation, decompres­sion sickness, body heat balance, respiration, circulation, spatial disorientation, vision and hearing.

AVI250 - Private Pilot Practical Credits: 3
Estimated cost to student (subject to change) $6,525.90
Cost includes: 32.5 hours of Aircraft Rental
2.5 hours of Simulator Rental
30 hours of Dual Flight Instruction
16.5 hours of Ground Instruction
Course Materials
FAA Written Exam Fee
FAA Practical Exam Fee
State Sales Tax

AVI252 - Instrument Flight Practical Credits: 3
Estimated cost to student (subject to change) $ 6,466.78
Cost includes: 24 hours of Aircraft Rental
14 hours of Simulator Rental
38 hours of Dual Flight Instruction
11 hours of Ground Instruction
Course Materials
FAA Written Exam Fee
FAA Practical Exam Fee
State Sales Tax

AVI254 - Commercial Pilot Practical I Credits: 3
Estimated cost to student (subject to change) $ 10,152.50
Cost includes: 62.5 hours of Aircraft Rental
8 hours of Simulator Rental
42.5 hours of Dual Flight Instruction
3.5 hours of Ground Instruction
Course Materials
State Sales Tax

AVI255 - Commercial Pilot Practical II Credits: 3
Estimated cost to student (subject to change) $ 9,430.96
Cost includes: 18 hours of Aircraft Rental
28.5 hours of Complex Aircraft Rental
3 hours of Simulator Rental
36 hours of Dual Flight Instruction
10.5 hours of Ground Instruction
Course Materials
FAA Written Exam Fee
FAA Practical Exam Fee
State Sales Tax

BIO101 - Introduction to Biological Science I Credits: 3
Structure, metabolism, development, reproduction and evolution of plants and animals; for students in non-technical fields.

BIO102 - Human Genetics and Ecology Credits: 3
This course emphasizes the role genetics and ecology has in everyday life. Some important topics to be covered include: parts and function of the cell; human reproduction; role of DNA and RNA in protein synthesis; Mendelian genetics; chromosomal abnormalities; birth defects; and biogeochemical cycles.
Prerequisite: College-level Biology Course.

BIO110 - Biological Food Science Credits: 3
The course is designed to introduce culinary students to scientific fundamentals and apply them to culinary study. This course will meet the science requirements for the culinary arts program. Materials covered in this course will include the metric system, scientific method basic laws of chemistry and biology, plant and animal cellular and tissue structure, chemical reactions and basic organic structure.
Prerequisite: MAT-050

BIO120 - Anatomy/Artists Credits: 3
The student will study the anatomical construction of the human form. Both the inner and surface anatomy will be studied as a unit. Emphasis will be placed on the skeletal, muscular and integumentary systems. Laboratory work will include a detailed examination of disarticulated bones, complete skeletons and models of the muscular arrangements in the limbs.

BIO121 - General Biology Credits: 4
An introduction to the chemistry of living things is studied. Emphasis is given to the hierarchy of biological organization, genetics and the systematic arrange­ment of living things with emphasis on the plant kingdom. Laboratory work in­cludes use of the compound light microscope, study of cells and tissues, plant anatomy and reproductive patterns.

BIO122 - General Biology II Credits: 4
This course is concerned with anatomy and physiology of the Kingdom Animalia (Metazoa) with an emphasis on humans. Selected invertebrate and vertebrate speci­mens are dissected.
Prerequisite: Completion of BIO 121 with a grade of C or better.

BIO125 - Basic Human Anatomy and Physiology Credits: 4
The study of the human body in relation to its component parts, the study of the function of the human system, such as the digestive, respiratory, nervous, muscu­lar, endocrine, excretory, reproductive, skeletal and integumental systems. A one semester course surveying the basics of anatomy and physiology. Some dissection performed in lab.

BIO130 - Basic Anatomy Credits: 4
A one-semester lab course focusing on the practical and fundamental knowledge of the anatomy of the human body and the related terminology used in the health care fields. Emphasis being placed on the understanding and proper utilization of the prefixes, suffixes and root words used in the health care fields. The basic components and functions of the bodyís organ systems will be discussed in conjunction with related diseases and medical procedures. Lab work will include bones, models and presentations to reinforce understanding and application of terms and concepts.

BIO135 - Anatomy & Physiology I Credits: 4
First semester of a one-year sequence. Emphasis is placed on basic cellular structure; cell types; tissue; cell division and physical-chemical events in the living cell; skeletal system, reproductive system and endocrine system. Wherever possible, clinical aspects will be stressed.

BIO136 - Anatomy & Physiology II Credits: 4
Second semester of a one-year sequence. Emphasis is placed on the study of gross structure and physiology of: muscular system, nervous system, cardiovascular system, respiratory system, urinary system, digestive system and fluids & electrolytes. Whenever possible, clinical aspects will be stressed.
Prerequisite: Completion of BIO 135 with a grade of C or better.

BIO151 - Principles of Biology I Credits: 4
This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology.  Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, cell structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, and other related topics.  Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels. Laboratory work includes use of the compound light microscope, study of cells and cellular transport, chemical energy processes, enzymatic function, and genetics.

BIO152 - Principles of Biology II Credits: 4
This course is designed to cover the evolution of the major organ systems of the Kingdom Animalia to include invertebrate and vertebrate species. The development of comparative structures as influenced by natural selection will be emphasized. The anatomy and physiology of the major organ systems will be stressed. Laboratory will include gross dissection and microscopic analysis of selected specimens.

BIO225 - Plant Biology Credits: 4
This course deals with plant form and function from an evolutionary point of view and is intended for majors in all fields of biology. Emphasis is placed on understanding basic processes of metabolism, evolution, reproduction, growth, development, and physiology of nonvascular and vascular plants. These processes are considered within the context of the environments, plants inhabit and human activities that affect or depend upon plants. Plant biotechnology and genetic engineering and their role in production of new food crops are also discussed
Prerequisites: BIO-151

BIO230 - Genetics Credits: 4
The course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of genetics. Topics of investigation include principles of Mendelian genetics, chromosomal theory, DNA structure, gene structure and expression, and population genetics. Lab investigations will utilize various methods of genetic analysis including the extraction and manipulation of DNA, gel electrophoresis, and polymerase chain reactions (PCR).
Prerequisites: BIO-151 and CHE-152

BIO251 - General Microbiology Credits: 4
A study of basic structure, chemical nature, growth, nutrition, metabolism, genetics and classification of bacteria, viruses, rickettsiae and fungi. Includes a discussion of immunology and effects of chemical and physical agents on the growth of these microorganisms. Lab involves manipulation, cultivation and iden­tification of microorganisms. Designed for students pursuing a career is the sci­ence or related fields.
Prerequisite: Completion of BIO 121 or BIO 135 with a course grade of a C or better.

BIO290 - Research for Natural Sciences Credits: 3
This course is a capstone of your experiences in science courses. The course is designed to prepare the student for higher level courses upon transfer which require research project skills.
Prerequisite: BIO 151.

BUS101 - Introduction to Business Credits: 3
This course will provide the business student with a solid foundation that they need to succeed in today's competitive business world. It will include the following topics: the business environment, including global business; business trends, including forming a business and franchises; management; human resources, including motivating and satisfying employees; marketing; business strategy, including accounting and decision making, and e-business; and finance.

BUS105 - Business Mathematics Credits: 3
Designed for students who plan to major in a business areas, this course stresses comprehension of mathematical concepts used in business; percentage as applied to markup and markdown, trade and cash discounts, calculations, interest, commission sales, installment buying, payroll and compound interest.

BUS107 - Mathematics of Finance Credits: 3
Topics include simple interest, bank discount and rediscount, compound inter­est; stocks, bonds, insurance and annuities; depreciation, amortization and sinking funds; approximate computation and capital budgeting.
Prerequisites: MAT 105 OR 121, or permission of the instructor.

BUS201 - Principles of Marketing I Credits: 3
The scope and significance of marketing; the markets for consumer and indus­trial goods; the wholesaling and retailing of consumer goods; the marketing of agricultural and industrial goods and the marketing policies and practices of busi­ness firms.

BUS203 - Introduction to Sales Credits: 3
A study of the basic principles of successful selling; included are such topics as the place of the salesperson in our competitive economy, developing a sales-winning personality, and the selling cycle from prospecting through closing the sale; emphasis is placed on creative selling and specialty goods; deals with the background information needed by salespeople; analyzes the selling process and the relationship existing between the business firm and the salesperson.

BUS208 - Introduction to International Business Credits: 3
The fundamentals of international business are discussed. Topics range from international organizations through the uncontrollable forces influencing management of international business. The tools of management and strategies designed to increase the knowledge of new global markets are examined in detail. World finance, accounting, logistics, are placed in the proper perspective. Same course as INB 102 and BUS 181; duplicate credit not possible

BUS209 - Business Communications Credits: 3
Developing skill in clear, persuasive writing; style and correct work is supplemented by practical exercise in composing credit, collection, adjustment, inquiry and sales letters; students prepare job applications and a brief report.

BUS210 - Introduction to Customer Service Credits: 3
This course will describe and define professional customer skills: what customer service is and what it isn't; and the rational for improving service. Three areas of customer service will be examined in detail - decision making service (helpingpeople decide), problem-solving service, and time-of-purchase service.

BUS229 - Personal Money Management Credits: 3
Discussion of the problems involved in efficient handling of personal money matters, taxes, life insurance, investments, borrowing, buying a home, mortgages, savings, annuities, will trusts, budgeting and many other topics. (Spring only)

BUS231 - Principles of Management Credits: 3
This is a survey course designed to introduce the student to the basic concepts and analytical techniques of management. Functions of management discussed include: traditional viewpoints of organization and new developments; motivation and the human element of organization; planning and decision-making; control and its applications; motion and time study; managerial economics and managerial accounting; schematic analysis; mathematical and statistical approaches in decision-making.

BUS248 - Small Business Management Credits: 3
This course investigates and prepares the student for the challenges and opportunities of sharing and owning an entrepreneurial business. Topics studied will include the characteristics of a successful small business person, opportunities and options for a small business start up, and the planning, organizing, financing, and operations of a firm from its beginning through the growth process.
Emphasis will be placed on the startup plan, the marketing strategy development, financing and accounting basics, and profit through the control process.

BUS251 - Human Resource Management Credits: 3
Human Resource Management is concerned with the planning, organizing, directing, and controlling the functions of procurement, development, maintaining and utilizing a labor force for personal, company and community objectives. Human resource managers perform four roles: administrative, employee advocate, operational and strategic. The course includes topics relevant to personnel activities such as compensation, benefits, safety and security obligations.

BUS253 - First-Line Supervisory Principles Credits: 3
Practical experience and analysis of the principles of first-line management is used to assist the practitioner in becoming the successful key individual of an organization. A practical approach in the concepts and practices of organization, human behavior and managerial skills, supervisory duties, and the effects of governmental and social influences is given. The short incidents and role play are utilized as significant educational tools. (Spring only)

BUS261 - Business Law I Credits: 3
The fundamental principles of commercial law with emphasis on laws of soci­ety, contracts, bailments, personal property; cases relating to topics of discussion will be utilized to give application to the basic principles.

BUS262 - Business Law II Credits: 3
Continuation of Business Law I, including a study of legal principles covering sales of goods, insurance, suretyship, partnership, corporations, real property, leases, and bankruptcy.
Prerequisite: BUS 261.

BUS263 - Office Management Credits: 3
Modern management principles and practices in the organization, operation and control of office functions; this includes the study of physical facilities and office machines; personnel management, including analysis of supervision, training, job evaluation and wage administration as applied to the office environment.

BUS299 - Business Internship Credits: 3
Students will be placed in selected Businesses to perform internships designed to give students the opportunity to make practical application of their course work in a business setting.
Prerequisite: 18 credits in ACC or BUS taken in the Business Management Technology Program

FIN101 - Introduction to Finance Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the study of finance. The course introduces basic principles in finance such as financial statement analysis, financial ratio analysis, cash flow analysis, the time value of money, stock and bond valuation, valuation of the firm and financial assets, and capital budgeting.
Prerequisites: ACC 111, ACC 112, ECO 151, ECO 152, MAT 107
Co-requisite: MAT-140

FIN102 - Introduction to Financial Services Credits: 3
This course provides students with a practical introduction to the financial services field through a survey of the various financial markets that employ financial services workers. All of the key financial markets and industries are explored including banking, insurance, and investments. Representatives employed within these financial market industries will be invited into the class to discuss the academic preparation and skill sets required for effective employment in the changing landscape of these financial markets. The course also provides students with the opportunity to develop their critical-thinking and problem-solving skills by completing projects and working with computer software that simulates the financial services industry experience.

CHE111 - Fundamentals of Chemistry Credits: 3
This course is intended for non-science majors with little prior knowledge of Chemistry to aid them in understanding the role of Chemistry in society.

CHE131 - Principles of Chemistry I Credits: 3
An introduction to the fundamental principals of general chemistry. A course designed for students who require an overview of chemistry with a labortory component. Fundamental concepts of chemistry will be presented in a format that is understood by non-science majors and will be related to their specifi c area of study. Emphasis is placed on basic nomenclature, balancing equations, elemental stoichiometry, energy changes, solutions, concentrations, acids, bases, buffers and the gas laws.
Prerequisite: MAT 050 or placement by exam.

CHE151 - General Chemistry I Credits: 4
The fundamental principles and theories of chemistry; the period classification; the nature of atoms; chemical bonding, chemical calculations; the gas laws; solu­tions and their colligative properties.
Prerequisite: Secondary School Chemistry or Algebra or placement by exam.

CHE152 - General Chemistry II Credits: 4
Includes the following topics: the colloidal state; chemical kinetics; ionic equilibrium; nuclear chemistry; electrochemistry; properties of selected metallic and non-metallic elements; and some organic chemistry.
Prerequisite: CHE 151 (grade C or better).

CHE251 - Organic Chemistry I Credits: 4
An introduction to the chemistry of the carbon compounds, particularly the aliphatic compounds; special emphasis is given to structural theory and mecha­nism reactions; laboratory work includes properties and preparation of organic compounds.
Prerequisite: CHE 152 (grade C or better).

CHE252 - Organic Chemistry II Credits: 4
Special emphasis on the chemistry of aromatic compounds; laboratory work includes the synthesis and analysis of organic compounds.
Prerequisite: CHE 251 (grade C or better).

CHE255 - Crime Pattern Analysis Credits: 4
Students will begin learning basic concepts of criminalistics using a crime scene focus. Students will learn how to properly document a crime scene, recognize and collect physical evidence, and how to properly interpret physical patterns in reconstruction often associated with crime scenes. In addition, students will learn about theoretical and practical aspects on the proper analysis and interpretation of particular types of evidence that contain physical patterns used in individualization and reconstruction. An introduction to the analysis of various types of forensic pattern evidence serves as a strong introduction to the foundational principles associated with criminalistics from a scientific perspective.
Prerequisites: CHE-152
Corequisite: CAR-119

CHE299 - Special Topics in Chemistry Credits: 3
Emphasis is placed on standard laboratory techniques and scientific methods. A professional standard laboratory research book will be maintained. Students will gain proficiency in using basic laboratory instruments and glassware. A research project will be defined and a lab protocol will be described for the collection and analysis of data. A Research Report will be prepared and submitted by each student or team of students.

CAR119 - Drawing I Credits: 3
Aimed at the beginning art student, this course allows the discovery of line, form, structure, placement, and value. These processes help the student translate observed reality with all its variety and three dimensional substance on a two di­mensional surface.

CAR120 - Drawing II Credits: 3
The further development of drawing skills learned in Drawing I and the appli­cation of this knowledge through a variety of projects. This course will emphasize the conceptualization processes from generating the idea to the tangible communi­cation of the individual's concept. Projects will be more extensive in nature than in Drawing I.
Prerequisite: CAR 119.

CAR129 - Color and Design I Credits: 3
This course consists of lectures and critiques on color theory and design con­cepts and applications. Class assignments emphasize creative problem solving tech­niques within specific limitations and specifications. Hue, value and chroma, the use of transparent and opaque color effects, textures, etc., are explored in relation­ship to design.

CAR131 - Sculpture I Credits: 3
This course will be taught in the classical sense; students will be expected to reproduce in clay, exact copies of eyes, nose, mouth, ears, hands and feet. This work will then be directly applied to sculpting the human form as a whole.

CAR132 - Life Drawing I Credits: 3
In Life Drawing the student studies proportion, balance, and the interpretation of gesture, line and value of the human figure in various poses. The student learns anatomy from schematic drawings, by copying old masters drawings and by lec­tures on bone and muscle given by the instructor.

CAR133 - Life Drawing II Credits: 3
An extension of Life Drawing I including exploration of different media. The poses are more extended and the studies more intense.
Prerequisite: CAR 132.

CAR140 - Basic Black and White Photography Credits: 3
This is an entry-level course designed to enable the student to become aware of the fundamentals of black and white film photography. Exposure to cameras, lenses, enlarging equipment, and light-sensitive emulsions provide a practical hands-on approach that allow the student to enjoy and apply the technical aspects of photography with his/her personal creative instincts. Access to a manually adjustable 35mm film camera is required.

CAR201 - Building A Brand Credits: 3
In this course students will learn what is involved with building a corporate identity. Students will learn how to understand the needs of a client and develop professional company logos and collateral pieces, based on marketing research and incorporate them into several different media outlets. Students will be exposed to both limited and unlimited budgets, and understand what it takes to build a company and the products or services it offers. Overall focus of this course will be on visual design through the use of computer related applications.
Pre requisites: CAR-241, CAR-242

CAR202 - Creative Art Direction Credits: 3
This course is an introduction into the world of art direction. The student will work with designated clients to understand their needs and develop professional works of art that solve the clients problems. The student will learn how to give direction, as well as be able to take constructive direction. Upon completion of this course the student will be able to work with creative directors, graphic designers, copywriters, marketing managers and photographers in order to produce innovative concepts and layouts.
Pre requisites: CAR-242

CAR203 - Advertising and Graphic Design for the Web Credits: 3
In this course students will learn what is involved in promoting a corporate identity online through advertising and promotion. Students will learn how to increase the visibility of a web site through the use of online marketing techniques such as search engine submission, press releases, banner advertising, e-mail marketing, reciprocal links and guerilla marketing. The overall focus of the course will be the development of a successful online advertising model.
Pre requisites: COM-104, COM-107

CAR205 - Advertising Campaign Design Credits: 3
This course is a culmination of all the required courses in the advertising curriculum. It will explore all aspects of advertising, past, present and future. Each student will use all of the learned abilities from the foundation courses to implement strong, targeted, innovative advertising campaigns for their clients.
Pre requisites: CAR-201, CAR-202

CAR218 - Professional Painting Portfolio Credits: 1
In this course, the student learns to create an image that is professional and marketable to galleries and commercial art buyers. They also learn to organize, promote and set up a one-person show.
Prerequisite: The course will be taken in the student's final semester after having completed the recommended painting courses.

CAR220 - Basic Photography Credits: 3
Basic Photography is an entry level course designed to enable the student to become aware of the fundamentals of black and white photography. Exposure to cameras, lenses, enlarging equipment, and light-sensitive emulsions through a practical hands-on approach will allow the student to enjoy and apply the technical aspects of photography with his or her personal creative instincts.

CAR233 - Illustration I Credits: 3
The main purpose of this course is to have the student become aware of the possibilities of painting techniques in Illustration. Special effects and image mak­ing will be taught. Hundreds of examples of professional illustration will be used to show students a variety of techniques.

CAR234 - Illustration II Credits: 3
An extension of Illustration I in which the student creates more complicated illustrations using techniques learned in Illustration I, as well as additional meth­ods. Projects are more long term in nature.
Prerequisite: CAR 233.

CAR239 - Portrait Painting Credits: 3
This course consists of the study of the complete structure of the human head. The portrait is first studied in separate units, then put together as a complete struc­ture. Light, proportions, anatomy, planes, and composition will be the principles taught. Video and group critiques will also be employed as teaching aids.

CAR240 - Advanced Black and White Photography Credits: 3
This class enables the student to extend his or her basic photographic skills. Medium and large format cameras are introduced and explored. Specialized black and white darkroom skills and attention to print presentation are stressed. Lectures and assignments will provide the student with the tools for developing a sense of personal vision through photography.
Pre requisites: CAR-140

CAR241 - Graphic Design I Credits: 3
Graphic Design I introduces students to visual communication through the study of the elements of art, the principles of design, and how they fit together. Color theory, typography, idea development, and creative design concepts will be explored through lectures, demonstrations, extensive studio work, and critiques.

CAR242 - Graphic Design II Credits: 3
This course further develops the skills developed in CAR 241 in design, grid systems, advertising techniques, and publication design by providing students with in-depth proficiency in design principles and vocabulary. With the Adobe Creative Suite, students learn advanced techniques in graphic design for traditional and new media.
Prerequisite: CAR 241.

CAR243 - Materials and Techniques of Painting Credits: 3
The course is designed to give the student the opportunity to explore various types of materials and techniques that an artist will have to know to adequately perform a variety of types of painting tasks. Techniques may be applied to both commercial and fine art applications.

CAR245 - Typography Credits: 3
An introduction to the world of typography through which the student develops a fundamental knowledge of how to work with type. The student studies design of type and how it is used as a functional element in layout. The student learns basic typesetting skills as they apply to the Adobe software.

CAR256 - Still Life Painting Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide a solid foundation of painting skills with emphasis on drawing, value, analyzing color, and composition, as they apply to work from still life set ups and preparation of paint and painting surfaces.

CAR257 - Animal Painting Credits: 3
Using the various mediums, the student learns the basic fundamentals of paint­ing animals, birds and fish. Anatomy and the basic structures of the animal are studied. The student learns how to paint surface details such as fur and feathers. The importance of research is stressed.

CAR258 - Landscape Painting Credits: 3
Basic artistic skills are taught which enable students to pursue landscape paint­ing competently. "How to See" color, value, light, and perspective as they apply to landscape painting are topics covered.

CAR259 - Learning From the Old Masters Credits: 3
This course consists of two specific painting methods, the venetian and flemish, which covers a wide range of painting principles the student can incorporate into his/her own painting style.

CAR260 - Color Photography Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide an understanding of basic color photographic processes. Negative exposure, basic scanning, digital exposure and digital color printing will enable the student to develop sufficient technical skills necessary to produce "quality" images. The subjective definition of "quality" images will be explored through class assignments and critiques. Access to a manually adjustable DSLR camera is recommended.
Pre requisites: CAR-140

CAR261 - Independent Study I Credits: 3
Field Work in Commercial Art allows the student to pursue an independent study, individually under supervision, to specialize in an area not covered in Com­mercial Art courses.

CAR264 - Photolighting and Theory of Composition Credits: 3
Light is the photographer's medium, while the "rules" of visual composition are important in determining what a photograph says. Assignments and lectures in this class will allow the student to explore the impact of light and composition upon his/her photographs.
Pre requisites: CAR-140

CAR265 - Portrait and Wedding Photography Credits: 3
Portraiture techniques, lighting, posing, camera formats, wedding techniques, marketing and selling images, and basic business practices will be covered. Handling studio portraiture situations and also location wedding photography will be explored in hands-on class projects. Professional quality images and an understanding of operating a photographic enterprise are the expected outcomes from this class.
Pre requisites: CAR-140, CAR-260, CAR-264

CAR267 - Photojournalism Credits: 3
Creating newsworthy photographs under the pressure of adverse conditions is the challenge of the photojournalist. The technical skills required for this challenge are incorporated into the projects. Lectures will not only deal with the technical side but also stress the ethical responsibilities related to covering the social, cultural, political, and entertainment activities of our society.
Pre requisites: CAR-140

CAR268 - Nature Photography Credits: 3
Nature photography encompasses a wide variety of approaches and techniques. This course will provide an opportunity to identify the technical equipment necessary to record quality images of our natural environment along with an appreciation for the aesthetic characteristics required for a successful photograph. Access to a manually adjustable DSLR camera is required.
Pre requisites: CAR-140

CAR270 - Photo Portfolio and Professional Development Credits: 3
The building of a portfolio will be different for each student. Along with the instructor's input the student will choose the directions of his/her career. The resulting portfolio should reflect this direction. Financial and business basics, self promotion, editing, stock photography, portrait and wedding photo, setting up a studio, are some examples of class discussion topics.
Pre requisites: CAR-140, CAR-220, CAR-240, CAR-260, CAR-271

CAR271 - Photo Studio I Credits: 3
This class introduces the student to all aspects of the working photographic studio. Various camera formats are used as well as studio flash systems. Projects in black and white, color and digital covering still life, product and portrait subjects are required. All projects will be done completely in-house utilizing our studio and darkroom facilities.
Pre requisites: CAR-140

CAR272 - Photo Studio II Credits: 3
This course further explores the capabilities of commercial photography. Shooting a product, creating a photo for a specific ad design, and corporate portraiture are a few examples of project categories. The techniques used will include various format cameras using black and white, color negative, and color transparency films. The resulting photos from this class will be of portfolio quality.
Pre requisites: CAR-140, CAR-271

CAR275 - Advanced Digital Photography Credits: 3
This class will cover high resolution scanning of existing film images, image capture using single shot and scanning back digital cameras, and image output (printing) of digital files. Basic photographic skills are required.
Prerequisites: CAR 220

CAR277 - Photo Image Enhancement Credits: 3
This course introduces the techniques involved in enhancing photographic im­ages through the use of a computer. Students will learn a variety of techniques while working on assignments utilizing stock photos as well as their own photos. Image retouching, colorization, color correcting, scanning and incorporating text are topics that will be addressed.

CAR279 - Portfolio/ Professional Practices Credits: 3
In this course, students will learn the various components of the Internet including, but not limited to, using e-mail, preparing web pages, and using the Internet as a research tool. Students will also learn about preparing and delivering computer-based presentations. Students will have the opportunity to prepare their professional portfolio in anticipation of future job searches.
Prerequisites: CAR 241, CAR 276, CAR 277, CAR 284.

CAR280 - Independent Study II Credits: 3
An extension of Field Work/Independent Study I which allows the student to pursue additional study in areas of interest not covered under curriculum offerings.
Prerequisite: CAR 261. Final semester after completing recommended courses, student must have GPA of 3.0 or higher.

CAR281 - Internship Credits: 3
The student works in an agency or other business in the communication arts industry under the supervision of a sponsor to gain on-the-job training. Internships are competitive and are awarded by the department faculty at their discretion to students who meet the following qualifications: GPA 3.0 or higher, good attendance record, professional work habits and attitude, no incompletes from previous semesters.

CAR284 - Digital Illustration for Design Credits: 3
In this course students will become proficient using the industry standard computer illustration program. Students will understand the aspects of digital illustration, including the tools and techniques of artwork preparation in the digital world. Overall focus of this course will be on design and color principles, typography and visual translation skills for digital design.
Corequisite: COM 107.

CAR293 - Web Page Design Credits: 3
In this course students will learn how to design and develop on-line material. Students will become familiar with HTML and CSS web-based languages as well as on-line interface and digital media design requirements. Students will use industry standard computer graphics programs and Internet based programs to create original and unique on-line material. Functionality and aesthetics will be stressed as students gain exposure to the digital media design processes.
Prerequisite: COM 107

CAR294 - Conceptual Graphics Credits: 3
Students will learn the basics of 2D /3D as they prepare for careers in CGI-based industries such as game development, computer animation studios, post-pro- duction and special effects studios. This course explores image-editing techniques for producing sophisticated still graphics and animations. Students will learn conceptual, aesthetic and production considerations while developing founda- tional skill sets working with and creating immersive and engaging scenes utilizing basic elements of the 2D/3D development such as planning, digital painting, textures, lighting, mood/tone, staging scenes, envi- ronments and animated storyboards. This course covers the basics of development, design and rendering output of appropriate stills and video les for digital distribu- tion. Student?s projects will focus on developing conceptual and artistic skills using industry-software applications.
Prerequisite: COM 214 or instructor permission.

CAR295 - Multimedia for the Web Credits: 3
Multimedia for the Web is an intermediate level course designed to enable students to become aware of the use of multimedia in web design. Students will use Macromedia Flash to create interactive web pages utilizing animations and effects that they create.

CIS100 - Basic Computer Skills Credits: 3
This course is intended for students whose familiarity with computers and computer applications is limited. The student will learn basic Windows operating system concepts and commands, management of files and folders on computers and USB drives, use of the Internet (for research, e-mail, and college classes), word processing with Microsoft Word, creating a presentation using Microsoft PowerPoint, and an introduction to spreadsheets with Microsoft Excel.
Prerequisite: Placement by exam
Corequisite: OMT 119 or placement by exam.

CIS104 - Hospitality Computer Applications Credits: 3
This course introduces the student to the current "industry standard" software packages in word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation software, etc. It is not intended to teach programming but to furnish a general knowledge of how a computer works using a hands-on methodology. It also introduces hotel and restaurant students to software applications as it relates to the hotel/restaurant industry. Students will also learn how the computer offers unique advantages in discovering recipes, travel requirements, and information dealing with profit and loss controls on the internet.

CIS105 - Travel Computer Applications Credits: 3
This course introduces students to computer airline reservation systems. Us- ing the semi-automated business related environment: (SABRE) software, students are provided with a simulated computer reservation system. The software was developed in cooperation with the training departments of major US airlines. The software also contains simulations of customer requests to test student skills.

CIS106 - Computers in Industry Credits: 3
This is an introduction to information systems and computers. Students develop a basic understanding of computer programming as it relates directly to the indus­try applications. Use of existing industry software augments and enhances student's own work. Formerly CIS 106, students cannot get duplicate credit.

CIS108 - Introduction to Computer and Programming Concepts Credits: 3
Principles of computing associated with electronic information processing and its utilization are presented. Hardware and software, input-output techniques, storage techniques, data communications, internet, web design, networking concepts and introduction to object oriented programming are studied to acquaint students with the latest methods used to accumulate process, store and interpret data. Topics in databases, computer ethics, privacy and security, current events, systems analysis and programming will also be covered.

CIS110 - Computer Literacy and Applications Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to computer concepts and technologies used for communication, problem-solving, decision-making and personal productivity. Topics covered include the current Microsoft Office suite in word processing, spreadsheets, databases and presentation software; the Internet, electronic communications, and the social, legal and ethical issues related to technology.
Prerequisites: CIS 100 Basic Computer Skills (Grade C or better) or placement by exam
Corequisite: OMT 119 Keyboarding or placement by exam

CIS111 - Word Processing with Microsoft Word Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide students with the most important concepts of word processing using Microsoft Office Word. The course first covers the basics of file management and the most important elements of the newest Microsoft Office interface. Students will learn how to create, edit, and format documents and multiple- page reports. Students will also learn desktop publishing, mail merge, and Web page creation. In the last portion of the course, students will learn advanced techniques, such as automating your work and using advanced on screen forms.
Corequisite: OMT 119 or placement by exam.

CIS112 - Spreadsheet Analysis using Microsoft Excel Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide students with the most important concepts of spreadsheets using Microsoft Office Excel. The course first covers the basics of file managment and the most important elements of the newest Microsoft Office interface. Students will learn how to create and format a workbook and work with formulas,functions, charts, and graphics. Students will also learn PivotTables and PivotCharts, advanced formulas and functions, and how to manage multiple worksheets. In the last portion of the course, students will learn advanced techniques, such as financial and what-if analyses, external data usage, and Visual Basic Application integration.
Prerequisite: CIS 110.

CIS114 - Database Analysis using Microsoft Access Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide students with the most important concepts of databases using Microsoft Office Access. The course first covers the basics of file management and the most important elements of the newest Microsoft Office interface.Students will learn how to create and build databases and define table structures. Students will also learn to maintain and query databases, create and use forms and reports, and enhance databases with advanced tools. In the last portion of the course, students will learn how to integrate, analyze, and automate tasks.
Prerequisite: CIS 110.

CIS116 - Presentation Analysis with Microsoft PowerPoint Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide students with the most important presentation concepts using Microsoft Office PowerPoint. The course first covers the basics of file mangement and the most important elements of the newest Microsoft Office interface. Students will learn how to create a presentation, including how to apply and modify text and graphic objects. Students will also learn how to add special effects, intergrate presentations with other Microsoft Office applications, and how best to collaborate with others on a presentation. In the last portion of the course, students will learn advanced techniques, such as applying advanced effects and creating special types of presentations.

CIS118 - Computer Applications for Science Majors Credits: 2
This course is designed to introduce science majors to spreadsheets and presentation software. Students will use math operations, functions, statistics and graphs to analyze and display data. Basic scientific application problems will be solved. Students will also create presentations to report their scientific findings.

CIS120 - PC Operating Systems with Microsoft Windows Credits: 3
Students will learn some of the most important topics about Windows environment, which includes protecting, optimizing, troubleshooting, managing mobile and remote computing, managing sofware, disks and devices, managing files and folders, and customizing. Students will be taught how to use Windows to be more productive, more collaborative, and more efficient.

CIS131 - Mobile Design and Concepts Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of how the mobile ecosystem works, how it differs from other mediums, and how to design products for the mobile context. Special emphasis will be placed on the design and development of applications among a wide variety of wireless devices. Topics covered include the Mobile Ecosystem, Designing for Context, Developing Mobile Strategies, Types of Mobile Applications, Mobile Information Architecture, Mobile Design, Adapting to Devices, Making Money in Mobile, and Supporting Devices.
Prerequisites: Prior programming course or programming experience required with departmental approval.

CIS135 - iOS Development I Credits: 3
In this course, students will learn to develop applications for mobile devices, specifically those running iOS. Apple?s iOS operating system is one of the two most common mobile operating systems. iOS currently runs on Apple?s iPhone, iPad, iPod Touch, and Apple TV devices. Topics covered include iOS Development, XCode and the Simulator, Cocoa Touch, Interface Builder, MVC Development Concepts, GUI Components, Multiview Applications, Tab Bars and Toolbars, Storing and Retrieving Application Preferences, Reading and Writing Data and Loading and Unloading Data.
Prerequisites: Prior programming course or programming experience required with departmental approval.
Co-requisite: CIS-131 Mobile Design and Concepts

CIS137 - Android Development I Credits: 3
In this course, students learn and apply programming principles and practices for the Android operating system framework (OS). This very popular OS serves a dominant part of all mobile development projects. The course takes a strong, hands-on approach in learning the Android OS. Initial lessons describe the framework and show how to use App Inventor, a free, longstanding Android development tool, to build and deploy Android applications (apps). Basic layouts and user interface widgets are covered. The course then switches to a full-featured integrated development environment (IDE), Google Android Studio. Many hands-on activities with Android Studio and underlying Java programming and XML languages are included to produce apps. Students complete the course being able to design, build, debug, and publish apps suitable for delivery in the Google Play Store, the official store and portal for Android apps.
Prerequisites: Prior programming course or programming experience required with departmental approval.
Co-requisite: CIS-131 Mobile Design and Concepts

CIS140 - Introduction to the Internet Credits: 3
In this course, students will learn about the various components of the Internet, including the World Wide Web, email and USENET. They will use the Internet as a communication tool, a research tool, and a study tool. They will also design and publish their own homepage, including an on-line resume. The course is designed for any student who wants to learn to make the most of the Internet.

CIS141 - Social Media Credits: 3
This course provides students with an introduction to the uses of social media for communication and digital marketing. Social media (such as Twitter, Facebook, other social networks, blogging, etc.) are communication technologies that enable individuals to create, share or exchange information, ideas and pictures/videos. Students will explore the possibilities and limitations of social media and gain practical social media skills using different social media technologies to create content. Students will learn how to use social media productively, and have a framework for understanding and evaluating new tools and platforms. Topics covered include Online and Social Media Marketing, Websites and Blogging, Search Engine Optimization, Social Advertising, Social Media Policies and Tools, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+.

CIS145 - Internet Concepts with HTML Credits: 3
In this course, students will learn basic Internet concepts and terminology. The students will also learn to "hard code" HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) as well as use a web page editor like Macromedia's Dreamweaver or Microsoft's FrontPage. Students will create and publish their site to a live web server and be able to view their pages through the World Wide Web.

CIS146 - Client Side Web Development I Credits: 3
In this course, students will learn the basic fundamentals of client side web page development. The students will use HTML 5 to create web pages that incorporate JavaScript, forms, CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). Students will also utilize good design principles, neat and orderly file structures and color theory and story boards to create a professional looking and functioning business website using a webpage editor like Adobe Dreamweaver.

CIS148 - Database Design with SQL Credits: 3
In this course, students will learn database concepts and terminology. The students will also learn to write SQL (Structured Query Language) statements to create, modify and query a database. Students will create ER (Entity Relationship) diagrams to explain entities, relationships, attributes and dependencies. Students will also learn and implement Normalization to control redundancy and avoid data anomalies.
Prerequisites: Prior programming course or programming experience required with departmental approval.

CIS156 - Programming with JAVA Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to guide students in using Java to write stand-alone applications. The student will come away with a basic understanding of the language and a working ability to use it. In addition to the basic syntax, data types and operators of the language the student will be introduced to object oriented programming.
Prerequisite: Prior programming course or programming experience required with departmental approval.

CIS158 - Object Oriented Programming with C++ Credits: 3
Students will be introduced to C++ programming used in the computer indus­try. This course is designed for a first course in computing using the C++ pro­gramming language and the principles of object technology. The goal is to teach problem solving using a computer. Using objects, to develop design principles and techniques that allow a programmer to manage data for the real world situ­ations. Libraries, header files, and student written functions will be used through­out the course.
Prerequisite: Prior programming course or programming experience required with departmental approval.

CIS163 - Programming with C# Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to Windows application development using the C# programming language and the Visual Studio Integrated Development Environment. Students will be presented with basic theory as well as a variety of hands-on programming tasks that will accompany the Visual Studio tooling environment and the C# programming language. By the end of this course, students will have the relevant experience that is needed to build real-world scenario applications for organizations.
Prerequisite: Prior programming course or programming experience required with departmental approval.

CIS165 - Multi-Media for the Web Credits: 3
In this course, students learn basic introductory and intermediate multimedia principles and technical practices. Concentration areas target digital imagery, audio and video editing, and concepts related to multimedia applicability in the Web. Students also study the use of industry leading multimedia software applications such as Adobe Photoshop Creative Cloud (CC) to create, render and manipulate multimedia assets optimized for Web delivery. Managing multimedia assets using Adobe Bridge CC is featured throughout the course.

CIS170 - Management Information Systems Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the skills they will need to work with management information systems (MIS) and apply information tech­nology to a wide variety of business problems. For students interested in pursuing a career in MIS development and management, this course will serve as a basis for understanding the role information systems play in businesses. For other students the goal is to provide an understanding of MIS that will enable them to effectively work with MIS professionals to apply information technology to a variety of busi­ness problems.
Corequisite: CIS 110

CIS172 - System Analysis and Design Credits: 3
Techniques used by a systems analyst to analyze and develop new mainframe sub-systems or analyze and modify existing, mainframe sub systems. Attention will be given to the system development cycle, data flow, hardware and software selection, system implementation, data security and user training.
Prerequisite: CIS 110

CIS180 - Networking and Communications Credits: 3
This course introduces the basic concepts of data communications and provides a background of communications technology which may be encountered in a com­puterized business or industry. Topics will include the telephone network, data versus analog signals, modems, communications media, communications equip­ment, data transmission, protocols, the Internet and IP networks, and general net­work architecture.
Prerequisite: CIS 120.

CIS235 - iOS Development II Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of CIS 135 iOS Development I. This course introduces students to more complex aspects of mobile development. Students will be introduced to the creation of applications that utilize more advanced user interfaces. This course will cover differences between tablet and phone development. Students will be introduced to the development of applications that work and look well on both phone and tablet devices. Topics covered include Tab Bars, Navigation Interfaces, Universal Applications, Popovers, Split View Controllers, Table Views, Storing and Retrieving Application Preferences, Reading and Writing Data, Core Data/SQLite, Working with Audio and Video, Background Aware Applications, Location Services and Interacting with services and applications.
Pre requisites: CIS-131 Mobile Design and Concepts, CIS 135 iOS Development I

CIS237 - Android Development II Credits: 3
In this course, students build upon the topics presented in CIS 137. These include Android development which features database integration, communication across apps, and integration of 2D and 3D images. With a growing promise toward wearable technologies, this course will also spotlight device sensory tools and Google Application Programming Interface (API) usage. Additional widget controls are covered to showcase complex activity designs.
Pre requisites: CIS-131 Mobile Design and Concepts, CIS 135 iOS Development I

CIS246 - Client Side Web Development II Credits: 3
In this course, intermediate and advanced techniques of client side web page development are presented as a follow-up to CIS 146. Students use Adobe Dreamweaver Creative Cloud (CC) to design and produce professional looking HTML 5 validated Web sites. Extensive use of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and the integration of JavaScript libraries, web fonts, multimedia files, forms, navigation menus, and page layout types are included. An emphasis on producing ?responsive design? Web pages through media queries is provided. Related Adobe CC applications are frequently integrated throughout the course, including Adobe Photoshop CC to work with ?smart objects,? Adobe Bridge CC to manage Web site assets, Adobe Acrobat XI Pro to develop interactive PDF files, and Adobe after Effects to create attractive animations.
Prerequisite: CIS 146 or with department chair approval.

CIS265 - Internet Programming with PHP Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to guide students in using PHP to write dynamic, database driven, web-based applications. PHP is a scripting language that is especially suited for server side web development. The student will come away with a basic understanding of the language and a working ability to use it. In addition to the basic syntax, and language elements, the student will be working with databases and SQL in producing multi-tier web sites.
Prerequisites: CIS 108 or CIS 145 or CIS 156 or CIS 158 or CIS 163.

CIS266 - Internet Programming with Java Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to Internet based applications using the Java programming language.   This course will cover topics on both server and client side Java concepts.   Concepts covered by this course include JSP (Java Server Pages), Servlets, JavaBeans, JDBC, and basic web application security.
Students will use this Java technologies to create Java based web applications that adhere to the latest programming standards and incorporate essential security features.
This course will cover concepts via in class discussions, in class examples, and hands-on exercises.
Prerequisite: CIS 156

CIS290 - Computer Information Systems Projects Credits: 3
A team comprised of two or more students will integrate systems analysis, systems design, programming, and business and information systems concepts, principles and practices in the development of a computerbased information system/web site. They will apply technical, managerial, communications and interpersonal skills to the development of this information system.
Prerequisites: (CIS 156 or CIS 158) or (CIS 148 and CIS 266).

CIS295 - Web Development Projects Credits: 3
Each student will integrate web design, programming, project management concepts, principles and practices in the development of a computer-based web application. They will apply technical, managerial, communications and interpersonal skills to the development of this application. Students will present their project to the client during a formal presentation event.
Prerequisites: CIS 148, CIS 246, and CIS 266.

CIS299 - Computer Information Systems Internship Credits: 3
Students will be placed in selected businesses to perform internships in various areas such as operations, help desk, applications, programming, networking, etc.
Prerequisite: (CIS 156 or CIS 158 or CIS 163) or (CIS 120 and CIS 111 and CIS 140 and CIS 112 or CIS 114).

CST103 - PC Operating Systems Technology Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide a comprehensive coverage of microcomputer operating systems, with a concentration on Microsoft Windows XP Professional and Vista. The course will also provide coverage of the latest in storage devices, current information on how to protect the security and privacy of a computer, and a preview of the next upgrade of Windows. Students will also learn techniques required for customizing Windows XP/Vista, implementing shortcut strategies using object linking and embedding (OLE) technologies, hard disk backup, evaluating system performance, installing software, installing and troubleshooting hardware, and exploring the Windows Registry. Students will be challenged with extensive projects, cases, and reinforcement exercises.

CST105 - Microcomputer Architecture/Multimedia Systems Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to how microcomputers and multimedia systems operate and the general benchmark parameters that affect their performance. Major topics include an examination of intended application software and its influences on architecture, basic CPU design and simulation, chipsets, pipelining, multicore, memory, video interfaces and I/O subsystems. Students will receive hands-on training in the configuration and troubleshooting of a microcomputer system.

CST132 - Computer Forensics Credits: 3
null

CST215 - Data Communications Credits: 3
Data communications will include data formats, codes, common interfaces, modulation techniques, protocols, networking and multiplexing.

CST220 - Network Security Issues Credits: 3
Through demonstration, students will be introduced to hardware that can be used to secure and monitor a network. Coverage includes firewalls, proxy servers, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), Intrusion Protection Systems (IPS), and Virtual Private Networks (VPN).
Students will be introduced to methods of risk analysis and well as information pertaining to the creation of security policies. Use of network analysis software, including vulnerabllity scanners, will be discussed and demonstrated.

CST221 - Personal Computer Security Credits: 2
This course is designed as a practical introduction to personal computer hardware and software security. The course will provide the student with an understanding of computer security terminology and concepts. Upon completion of the course the student will be able to implement a full range of security options to protect a PC environment. Topics include: physical security, Basic Input Output Systems (BIOS)/ Operating Systems (OS) password protection, Spyware & Antivirus software, and file encryption/ tracking.

CST225 - Systems Networking Credits: 4
This course presents the accepted methods of networking a variety of comput­ers and peripherals contained in the same general location. Emphasis is on the practical problems encountered with dynamically established communication links.

CST227 - Linux/UNIX Operating System Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide a practical, hands-on approach to the fundamental Linux/UNIX operating system concepts, architecture and administration. The power, stability, and flexibility of Linux/UNIX has contributed to its popularity in mission-critical business and networking applications. Specific topic coverage includes: the core of Linux/UNIX; exploring the Linux/UNIX file system and file security; Linux/UNIX editors; Linux/UNIX file processing; advanced file processing; introduction to shell script programming; Linux/UNIX utilities; Perl and Common Gateway Interface (CGI) programming.

CST230 - TCP/IP and Network Routers Credits: 3
This course is designed to present the student with basic TCP/IP terminology and concepts needed to take an active role in administering a network infrastructure that uses TCP/IP. Upon completion of the course students should be well-equipped to recognize, analyze, and troubleshoot a broad range of TCP/IP-related networking problems or phenomena. Students will complete hands-on projects that provide firsthand experience in installing, configuring, using, and managing TCP/IP on a working network.

CST232 - Forensics Analysis in a Windows Environment Credits: 3
An introduction to computer forensics emphasizing basic forensic methodology on a variety of file systems (FAT, NTFS, HFS, ext2, ext3) using Windows tools and techniques.

CAD101 - Computer Assisted Design I Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide an overview of computer assisted drafting (CAD) and design (CADD). Topics covered in the course will include the benefits of adopting and implementing CAD/D. System hardware and software specifications and options will be covered. Generic and system specific instruction will be provided and students will learn how to operate system components leading to the setting-up, creating, revising and plotting of drawings on a CAD system.

CAD102 - Computer Assisted Design II Credits: 3
This course is designed to expand upon the activities and functions covered in Computer Assisted Design I. Emphasis will be placed on mastery of concepts and skills, as well as on productivity and introduction of advanced software functions. Topics of coverage will include composition of drawings via system specific menu option utilization, use of advanced computer assisted drafting/design functions, and the application of special library symbols for the creation of two dimensional (2D), and basic three dimensional (3D) images.
Prerequisite: CAD 101.

CRC099 - Supplemental Skill Building Credits: 0
This class is designed to assist students in fulfilling testing requirements from an Incomplete received in CRC 112, 113, 114, 115, 211, or 212. Emphasis will be placed on clarity of stenographic notes, developing speed at required test levels, and accuracy in transcription. Speeds presented will be based on the individual student's needs.
Prerequisites: Incomplete received in CRC 112 through 115 or CRC 211 through 212

CRC110 - Verbatim Reporting I Credits: 6
Introduction of machine shorthand and basic principles of a realtime translation machine shorthand theory are taught. Students will begin with basic dictation of the alphabet, words, and phrases; and, thereafter, progress to application of the theory principles in writing and transcribing at the speeds of 30, 40, 50, and 60 words per minute (wpm).
Corequisite: ENG 101 and CJU 130

CRC111 - Verbatim Reporting II Credits: 6
Continued emphasis on building a realtime translation machine shorthand vocabulary and writing verbatim with increasing speed and accuracy through instruction of advanced machine shorthand writing principles. Students will begin stenographically writing and transcribing literary, jury charge, and question-and-answer testimony.
Prerequisites: CRC 110, ENG 101, CJU 130
Corequisite: CRC 130

CRC112 - Verbatim Reporting III Credits: 6
Emphasis on applying realtime translation shorthand principles to provide instantaneous translation through writing and transcribing verbatim literary, jury charge, and two-voice testimony at increasing speeds. Students will be expected to transcribe dictated materials using a computer-aided transcription system.
Prerequisites: CRC 111, CRC 130, and CRC 120.

CRC113 - Verbatim Reporting IV Credits: 7
Continued emphasis on building a realtime translation machine shorthand vocabulary for instantaneous translation. In addition, students will stenographically write verbatim literary, jury charge, and two-voice testimony at increasing speeds. Students will be expected to transcribe dictated materials using a computer-aided transcription system.
Prerequisites: CRC 112 and CRC 120
Corequisite: CRC 230

CRC114 - Verbatim Reporting V Credits: 7
Continued emphasis on building a realtime translation machine shorthand vocabulary for instantaneous translation. In addition, students will stenographically write verbatim literary, jury charge, and two-voice testimony at increasing speeds. Students will be expected to transcribe dictated materials using a computer-aided transcription system as learned in CRC 130 and CRC 230.
Prerequisites: CRC 113 and CRC 230
Corequisites: CRC 211, CRC 212, and CRC 220

CRC115 - Verbatim Reporting VI Credits: 6
Continued emphasis on building a realtime translation machine shorthand vocabulary for instantaneous translation. In addition, students will stenographically write verbatim literary, jury charge, and two-voice testimony at increasing speeds. Students will be expected to transcribe dictated materials using a computer-aided transcription system. Students will also receive instruction in preparation for the Skills Test portion of the National Court Reporters Association's Registered Professional Reporter examination.
Prerequisites: CRC 114 and CRC 220
Corequisite: CRC 290

CRC120 - English for Court Reporters Credits: 3
This course distinguishes between general grammatical rules and those unique to a verbatim transcript of proceedings from a courtroom or administrative hearing environment to allow the student to more clearly punctuate the spoken word. Proofreading and research skills will also be taught.
Prerequisites: CRC 110 and ENG 101.

CRC130 - Court Reporting Technology I Credits: 3
Introduction to computer-aided transcription (CAT). Development of writing and editing skills for real-time. Development of personal CAT dictionary.
Prerequisite: CRC 110
Corequisite: CRC 111

CRC211 - Medical Reporting Credits: 3
This course provides the Court Reporting/Captioning student medical vocabulary and corresponding dictated material of a medical nature, i.e., areas involving the body systems and functions, psychological and physical diseases, and drugs, with a focus on root words, prefixes and suffixes. The student is also instructed on the methods of researching medical information such as names and descriptions of diseases and drugs.
Prerequisites: CRC 113, HIM 120, and BIO 130.
Corequisite: CRC 114

CRC212 - Multiple-Speaker Reporting Credits: 3
Multiple-speaker dictation in simulated judicial and administrative hearing settings; with instruction in writing multiple speakers in the realtime environments of CART and Captioning. Emphasis is placed on proficiency in writing and distinguishing between more than one speaker while performing all duties and responsibilities of a judicial court reporter, CART provider, and Captioner. This course is designed to give the student a realistic, hands-on view of what can be expected in actual multiple-speaker reporting situations.
Prerequisite: CRC 113 and CRC 230.
Corequisite: CRC 114 and CRC 220

CRC220 - Realtime Reporting Procedures Credits: 3
This course will instruct the student in the most common procedural aspects of the realtime reporter's role in trials, depositions, administrative hearings, and the realtime venues of judicial reporting, captioning, and communication access realtime translation (CART). Review of the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) Code of Professional Ethics is presented. Students will incorporate current events into their study of the realtime profession.
Prerequisite: CRC 113.
Corequisites: CRC 114.

CRC230 - Court Reporting Technology II Credits: 1
Advanced realtime computer-aided transcription (CAT). Litigation support and applications of realtime technology in the CIC courtroom, depositions, captioning, and communication access realtime translation (CART).
Prerequisites: CRC 112 and CRC 130.
Corequisite: CRC 113.

CRC299 - Court Reporting Internship Credits: 3
The internship program is intended to give the student practical work experience in the judicial reporting environment and the freelance reporting environment. The internship will meet all NCRA Institutional Standards for Internship as described in the NCRA Council on Approved Student Education General Requirements and Minimum Standards.
Prerequisites: CRC-114, CRC-220, CRC-212
Corequisite: CRC-115

CJU130 - Introduction to Criminal Justice Credits: 3
This course is designed to explore the basic components of our criminal justice system, namely police, courts and corrections. The student will be introduced to each component from historical development to current operations, including the goals and objectives of each. Other areas to be covered include: criminal law, the trial process, an overview of the juvenile justice system and relevant contemporary issues.

CJU132 - Criminal Investigation Credits: 3
Criminal investigation is both a science and an art. This course will explore vari­ous techniques, principles, theories and problems of investigation, both at the crime scene and elsewhere. Topics include: crime scene search procedures, handling physical evidence, interviewing and interrogation and rules of evidence. Specific information relative to individual crimes will also be covered.

CJU139 - Survey of Drugs Credits: 3
This course will deal with the identification of various types of drugs, their physi­cal effects and history. Various classifications will be examined. Causes of abuse will be explored. Federal and state drug statutes will be examined. The student will review various rehabilitation and control programs.

CJU140 - Criminal Law Credits: 3
This course introduces basic legal principles of criminal law - both general principles and those related to specific offenses. Included is coverage of required criminal elements, defenses to responsibility and relevant constitutional amendments. Also covered will be Pennsylvania criminal statutes.
Prerequisite: CJU 132.

CJU141 - Delinquency and Juvenile Justice Credits: 3
This course will examine delinquency and our system of juvenile justice. The student will explore the nature, extent, and theoretical explanations of delinquency, as well as an overview of various agencies involved in handling the dependent and/or delinquent child. The course will also examine the role of the family, peers and school in the development of problem behavior. Other areas to be covered include: child abuse, police procedures, Pennsylvania's Juvenile Act and juvenile corrections.
Prerequisite: CJU 130.

CJU201 - Ethics in Criminal Justice Credits: 3
This course will explore ethical issues in the criminal justice system. The course begins with an analysis of morality, the notion of right/wrong, and the pursuit of justice. Ethical issues that impact law enforcement, courts, and corrections are specifically examined. Strategies for ethical decision making are evaluated.

CJU215 - Cyber Crime Credits: 3
This course is designed to explore computer forensics and cyber crime. The advent of computer technology and the information age has not only credited great opportunities for our society, but for the criminal element as well. For the offender, the computer offers a "safe haven", with the crimes often perpetrated at home or work, without direct face to face contact with the victim. Specific areas to be covered include: computer terminology and istory, specific crimes perpetrated with computers, legal issues relating to computer crime, computer forensics, and investigations.
Prerequisite: CJU 130 and 6 credits of CST or CJU.

CJU233 - Introduction to Law Enforcement Credits: 3
This course is designed to examine contemporary law enforcement in the United States. The course explores the origin and history of law enforcement, duties and responsibilities of various agencies, and contemporary issues that confront the police. Specific areas to be covered include: the impact of the Constitution upon policing, service provision, community policing, use of force, pursuits, civil liability, and the relationship law enforcement shares with the Criminal Justice System components.

CJU235 - Police-Patrol Operations Credits: 3
This course will explore basic police patrol operations and procedures covering both routine and emergency situations. Areas to be covered include: response to calls; preliminary investigations; police ethics; search and seizure; field interviews and interrogations; report writing and testifying in court. Practical field exercises are also included.
Prerequisite: CJU 130.

CJU238 - Police Personnel Management and Supervision Credits: 3
The student will explore basic management techniques including contempo­rary approaches focusing on situations and decisions unique to police supervi­sory needs. The course will also cover the history and philosophy of manage­ment. The student will be exposed to problem identification, decision making and management by objectives. Topics will include management skills such as organizational communication, labor relations, budgeting, employee motivation and conflict resolution.

CJU242 - Police Community Relations Credits: 3
The relationship between the police and the community is a reciprocal one. This course will explore the role of the department as well as the individual officer in maintaining adequate public trust and support. Methods by which the community can help to maximize the police function will be developed and analyzed. Human relations, public information and relationships with violators and complainants will be covered. Other topics include communication, press relations, stress, poli­tics, culture and conflict resolution.
Prerequisite: CJU 130.

CJU243 - Introduction to the Correctional System Credits: 3
The course will explore the history of punishment and corrections along with the development of modern corrections. The juvenile correctional system will be explored. Probation, parole and community based correction programs will be stud­ied. The student will study trends indicating the future course of corrections.
Prerequisite: CJU 130.

CJU245 - Crime and Criminology Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide an overview of the issue of crime in society, beginning with various conceptions of crime and how it is viewed by society and the legal community. A variety of theories of general crime causation will be cov­ered, emphasizing contemporary views in the biological, psychological, and socio­logical schools of thought, as well as integrated views. Also covered will be causal theories related to specific crimes, societal reactions to crime and criminals and the role of the victim in crime.

CJU250 - Practicum in Criminal Justice Credits: 3
The practicum is designed to provide the student with practical experience in a criminal justice or justice-related agency. Through supervised participation, the student will have the opportunity to integrate academic theory and practical experience. A minimum of 150 hours must be worked at the agency site. Reaction reports and group meetings will also be required.
Prerequisite: Minimum 21 CJU credits or permission of instructor.

CJU257 - Criminal Procedure Credits: 3
By developing an understanding of the substantive criminal law, students learn what acts and omissions are considered crimes, as well as the respective sanctions imposed against those who violate our laws. Equally important is developing an understanding of the procedural criminal law that governs the administration of criminal justice. This course is designed to explore the procedural component of the criminal law. Improper actions of criminal justice officials during the investiga­tion of a violation of the substantive law may result in the case being lost due to procedural errors. Areas to be discussed include: the court system, probable cause, the exclusionary rule, frisks, arrest, search and seizure, interrogation, as well as the consequences of improper police conduct.

CJU259 - Victimology Credits: 3
For many years, the criminal justice system has been faulted for overlooking the needs of the crime victims. Only recently, has the focus changed from perpetrator to victim. This course will serve as an introduction to the study of victimology. The course is divided into two components. First, crime victims and their interactions with the criminal justice system, society and the media will be examined. The con­cept of victim precipitation will also be addressed. Special needs victims (i.e., vic­tims of date rape, child abuse, and domestic violence), restitution, civil remedies available to victims, and vigilantism will also be covered. The second half of the course examines "victimless crimes" or "crimes without complainants." Issues such as morality, the notion of harm, and their relationship to the criminal law will be addressed. Specific areas to be covered include prostitution, drugs, homosexuality, and abortion.

CJU260 - Introduction to Security Credits: 3
An examination of the methods and techniques used to prevent and reduce losses due to theft and casualty. The course of study includes a consideration of the security survey, communication and surveillance system, control of person­nel and visitors, handling civil disturbance in public buildings, and other emer­gency situations.

CUL100 - Introduction to Culinary Arts Credits: 2
This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic principles of Culinary Arts. Emphasis will be placed on: culinary terminology, the effects of heat on food, cooking methods, knife skills, equipment identification/operation, ingredient identification, recipe comprehension and conversion.

CUL102 - Pantry and Cold Food Production Credits: 4
This course will consist of lectures and demonstrations intended to familiarize the student with breakfast cookery which includes egg cookery. The luncheon menu is also designed at this station which includes sandwich preparation, salad preparation and the preparation of salad dressing. The pantry cook is also responsible for the preparation of appetizers, non-baked desserts and cold foods for buffets.

CUL103 - Meat Analysis and Preparation Credits: 4
This course will consist of lectures and demonstrations intended to familiarize the student with Primal Cuts of Meat and how to best utilize such cuts. In addition, students will learn to butcher poultry and how to best utilize this food. The students will prepare meat and poultry using many different methods of cooking.

CUL104 - Principles of Vegetables, Starches and Fruits Credits: 2
This course will consist of lectures and demonstrations intended to familiarize the student with vegetable, starch and fruit identification. Emphasis will be placed on cooking methods and the effects of heat on each category of food.
Co- requisite: CUL-100

CUL105 - Soup and Sauce Analysis/Production Credits: 4
This course will consist of lectures and demonstrations, to familiarize the student with soup and sauce cookery; the actual preparation of all basic stocks, types of soups and sauces. The use of thickening agents in the preparation of this type of product, sweet sauce and their uses. Other sauces.

CUL106 - Baking Techniques and Analysis Credits: 3
This course will consist of lectures and demonstrations intended to familiarize the student with baked products produced from yeast, baking powder, etc. Em­phasis will be placed on baking methods and products used to produce different products. Emphasis is also placed on methods of mixing and baking equipment.

CUL108 - Food Sanitation and Safety Credits: 3
null

CUL110 - Fish and Seafood Analysis and Production Credits: 3
This course will consist of lectures and demonstrations intended to familiarize the student with all types of edible fish and seafood. To learn the basic principles of structures, handling and cooking methods, so that they can utilize the numerous varieties of seafood.

CUL299 - Internship-Culinary Arts Credits: 3
Students will work in the field to obtain a hands-on approach in the Culinary Arts. Students will work with local qualified food service operations in their area of specialization. Students will be required to maintain a 'C' average in all CUL courses to participate in this course. This may be completed on a co-operative education basis.
Prerequisites: CUL-100, CUL-105, HRM-105, CUL-102, CUL-103

DAS100 - Infection Control and Medical Emergencies Credits: 3
This course provides the knowledge, skill and responsibilities of the dental assistant in the area of infection control and medical emergencies. Topics include disease transmission; infection control procedures; occupational safety precau- tions, procedures and protocols; OSHA regulations; HIPAA law; sterilization; health histories; vital signs; oxygen; neu- rological, cardiac, respiratory and other emergencies that can occur in the dental office.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 125.

DAS101 - Chairside Dental Assisting I Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to the knowledge, skills and responsibilities of the dental assistant. Topics include dental terminology, basic chairside skills, ergonomics, preventative dentistry, restorative dentistry assisting, moisture control, and topical anesthesia. The student will practice skills in a supervised clinical laboratory setting.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 125, DAS 100.
Corequisites: DAS 100, 102, 103, 104.

DAS102 - Dental Anatomy Credits: 3
This course provides a study of the normal anatomy of the oral cavity, teeth, head and neck. Laboratory activities are designed to reinforce course content.
Prerequisites: DAS 100, ENG 101, BIO 125.
Corequisites: DAS 101, 103, 104

DAS103 - Dental Materials Credits: 3
This course provides a study of the properties and manipulation of preventive and restorative dental materials. Laboratory activities are designed to reinforce course content.
Prerequisites: DAS 100, ENG 101, BIO 125.
Corequisites: DAS 101, 102, 104

DAS104 - Dental Specialties Credits: 4
This course provides an overview of specialty practices within dentistry including endodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, periodontics, prosthodontics and public health dentistry. Also, a hands on component is included which focuses on instrument identification, exchange and tray set ups for general dentistry and specialty procedures.
Prerequisites: DAS 100, ENG 101, BIO 125.
Corequisites: DAS 101, 102, 103

DAS111 - Chairside Dental Assisting II Credits: 3
This course provides further development of the knowledge, skills and responsibilities of the dental assistant. Topics include oral pathology, pharmacology and pain control, nutrition, medical emergencies, rubber dam application and special patients. The student will practice skills in a supervised clinical laboratory setting.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 125, DAS 100, 101, 102, 103, 104. Corequisites: DAS 112, 113, 114.

DAS112 - Dental Radiology Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of dental radiology principles and techniques. Topics include x-ray production, radiation safety, exposure techniques, film processing and mounting, digital radiographic findings and patient management. The stu­dent will practice skills in a supervised clinical laboratory setting.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 125, DAS 100, 101, 102, 103, 104. Corequisites: DAS 111, 113, 114.

DAS113 - Dental Practice Management Credits: 2
This course provides an overview of procedures used to manage dental offices and clinics. Topics include patient management, office design, appointment control, financial systems, dental insurance, record keeping, written and oral communication, supplies and inventory and business records.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 125, DAS 100, 101, 102, 103, 104. Corequisites: DAS 111, 112, 114.

DAS114 - Dental Assisting Clinical Practice Credits: 7
This course provides practical dental assisting experience through clinical rotations in area dental offices and clinics. A one-hour seminar each week will address psychology of personal relations, professional regulation and certification, professional associations, resumes and interviewing and legal/ethical issues in dentistry. The student will spend approximately 21 hours per week at clinical rotation sites.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 125, DAS 100, 101, 102, 103, 104. Corequisites: DAS 111, 112, 113.

DAS289 - Expanded Functions Dental Assistant Foundation Credits: 3
This course provides a basic foundation/review for the incoming EFDA student prior to the complex core courses DAS 290 and DAS 291. It combines basic tooth anatomy, chairside dental procedures, materials, and instruments. The Pennsylvania State Dental Practice Act will be reviewed in depth.
Corequisite: BIO-125

DAS290 - Dental Assisting Expanded Functions I Credits: 4
This course provides the theoretical and practical application of expanded functions which dental assistants may perform in Pennsylvania. These functions include coronol polishing, fluoride application, impressions for applications, provisional restorations, placement and removal of rubber dam and matrix band, and placement and finishing of amalgam and composite restorations. The student will practice skills in a supervised clinical laboratory setting on campus.
Prerequisite: Acceptance into program and DAS 289, BIO 125

DAS291 - Dental Assisting Expanded Functions II Credits: 2
This course provides further development of the practical application of expanded functions which dental assistants may perform in Pennsylvania. These functions include coronol polishing, fluoride application, impressions for applications, provisional restorations, placement and removal of rubber dam and matrix band, and placement and finishing of amalgam and composite restorations. The student will complete approximately 120 hours of clinical experience under the supervision of their dentist-employer.
Prerequisites: DAS 289 and DAS 290.

DHY100 - Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Credits: 2
This course provides a foundation in healthcare promotion. Topics include the broadening paradigm of dental hygiene, an introduction to the dental hygiene process of care and conceptualization and problem solving in patient care. Concepts of exposure control and disease transmission are introduced.
Prerequisite and/or corequisites: BIO 135, ENG 101.

DHY101 - Dental Hygiene Seminar I Credits: 2
This course provides an introduction to the study of dental hygiene. Topics include infection control, patient assessment and preventive dentistry.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 135, DHY 100
Corequisites: BIO 136, DHY 102, 103, 104, 105

DHY102 - Dental Hygiene Clinic I Credits: 3
This course introduces principles of dental hygiene assessment and instrumentation skills. The student will practice skills in a supervised clinical labora­tory setting.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 135, DHY 100
Corequisites: BIO 136, DHY 101, 103, 104, 105

DHY103 - Oral Histology and Embryology Credits: 2
This course presents a study of the embryonic development of the head, face and oral cavity. Histologic structure of the oral tissues with relation to their clinical form and function are discussed.
Prerequisite: BIO 135, DHY 100, ENG 101
Corequisites: BIO 136, DHY 101, 102, 104, 105

DHY104 - Dental Anatomy Credits: 3
This course provides a study of the normal anatomy of the oral cavity, teeth, head and neck. Laboratory activities are designed to reinforce course content.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 135, DHY 100.
Corequisites: BIO 136, DHY 101, 102, 103, 105

DHY105 - Dental Radiology Credits: 3
This course provides an overview of dental radiology principles and techniques. Topics include x-ray production, radiation safety, exposure techniques, film processing and mounting, radiographic findings and patient management. The student will practice skills in a supervised clinical laboratory setting.
Prerequisites: ENG 101, BIO 135, DHY 100.
Corequisites: BIO 136, DHY 101, 102, 103, 104

DHY111 - Dental Hygiene Seminar II Credits: 2
This course provides further study of dental hygiene. Topics include treatment planning, instrumentation and medical emergencies.
Prerequisites: BIO 135, 136, DHY 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105
Corequisites: DHY 112, 113, 114, 115.

DHY112 - Dental Hygiene Clinic II Credits: 3
This course provides further development of dental hygiene clinical skills. The student will provide dental hygiene services to patients in a supervised clinical setting. The student will be scheduled for 12 hours of clinic per week.
Prerequisites: BIO 135, 136, DHY 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105.
Corequisites: DHY 111, 113, 114, 115

DHY113 - Periodontics I Credits: 3
This course presents a study of the tissues of the periodontium in both health and disease. Areas of discussion include periodontal anatomy, disease classifica­tion, etiology, clinical examination, treatment planning, initial therapy and Chemo Theraputics.
Prerequisites: BIO 135, 136, DHY 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105.
Corequisites: DHY 111, 112, 114, 115.

DHY114 - Dental Materials Credits: 3
This course provides a study of the properties and manipulation of preventive and restorative dental materials. Laboratory activities are designed to reinforce course content.
Prerequisites: BIO 135, DHY 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105.
Corequisites: BIO 136, DHY 111, 112, 113, 115.

DHY115 - Nutrition and Oral Health Credits: 2
This course provides a study of nutrition and its effects on both general and oral health. Emphasis is placed on the role of nutrition in oral health problems includ­ing dental caries and periodontal disease.
Prerequisites: BIO 135, DHY 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105.
Corequisites: BIO 136, DHY 111, 112, 113, 114.

DHY122 - Advanced Dental Hygiene Procedures Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to advanced clinical dental hygiene procedures. The dental hygiene student will be introduced and instructed in oro-facial pathology; anatomy; armamentarium; and anesthesia treatment and application. Additionally, the student will practice skills in a supervised clinical laboratory setting, along with hands-on applications of oro-facial anesthesia administration in pre-clinical lab and clinical component setting.
Prerequisites: DHY 111, 112, 113, 114, 115.
Corequisite: DHY 205.

DHY201 - Dental Hygiene Seminar III Credits: 1
This course explores dental hygiene care for special patients and legal/ethical issues in dentistry.
Prerequisites: DHY 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 122, 205
Corequisites: PSY 103, DHY 202, 203, 204, 206, BIO 251.

DHY202 - Dental Hygiene Clinic III Credits: 4
This course focuses on initial periodontal therapy skills. The student will provide dental hygiene services to patients in supervised clinical settings both on and off campus. The student will be scheduled for 16 hours of clinic per week.
Prerequisites: DHY 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 122, 205.
Corequisites: PSY 103, DHY 201, 203, 204, 206, BIO 251.

DHY203 - Dental Health Education Credits: 2
This course provides an introduction to common oral health problems and the health education methods that can be used to assist individuals or groups in mak­ing informed decisions on matters affecting their oral health.
Prerequisites: BIO 136, DHY 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 122, 205
Corequisites: PSY 103, DHY 201, 202, 204, 206, BIO 251.

DHY204 - Dental Pharmacology Credits: 3
This course presents a study of the effects, indications, contraindications and in­teractions of drugs. Emphasis is placed on drugs commonly used in dental practice.
Prerequisites: BIO 136, DHY 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 122, 205
Corequisites: PSY 103, DHY 201, 202, 203, 206, BIO 251.

DHY205 - Oral Pathology Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to general pathology including etiology, progression and recognition of various pathological disturbances. Emphasis is placed on diseases which affect the oral structures and oral manifestations of sys­temic diseases.
Prerequisites: DHY 111, 112, 113, 114, 115.
Corequisite: DHY 122.

DHY206 - Periodontics II Credits: 2
This course presents a study of nonsurgical periodontal therapy, advanced periodontal evaluation techniques, evidenced-based approach to periodontal care and critical thinking in periodontal case management. Areas of discussion include innovations in nonsurgical therapy, surgical techniques, comprehensive periodontal assessment, clinical decision making, outcomes assessment in periodontal maintenance, and incorporating research evidence into clinical practice.
Prerequisites: DHY 111, 112, 113, 114, 115, 122, 205 Corequisites: DHY 201, 202, 203, 204, BIO 251, PSY 103.

DHY211 - Dental Hygiene Seminar IV Credits: 1
This course provides an overview of dental hygiene career planning and dental practice management.
Prerequisites: PHY 103, DHY 201, 203, 204, 206.
Corequisites: SPE 210 OR 125, SOC 215, DHY 212, 213.

DHY212 - Dental Hygiene Clinic IV Credits: 4
This course emphasizes transition to professional dental hygiene practice. The student will provide dental hygiene services to patients in supervised clinical settings both on and off campus. The student will be scheduled for 16 hours of clinic per week.
Prerequisites: PSY 103, DHY 201, 202, 203, 204, 206.
Corequisites: SPE 210 or 125, SOC 101, DHY 211, 213.

DHY213 - Community Dental Health Credits: 2
This course provides a study of the background and techniques in the planning, implementation and evaluation of community dental health programs. Commu­nity dental health projects and other field experiences will orient the student to the oral health needs of various population groups and create an awareness of current issues in dental public health.
Prerequisites: PSY 103, DHY 201, 202, 203, 204, 205.
Corequisites: SPE 210 OR 125, SOC 215, DHY 211, 212.

DTT101 - Diesel Truck Fundamentals Credits: 3
An introduction to the history, safety practices, shop equipment and employment opportunities available in the heavy truck industry. Emphasis will be placed on engine operation and basic fuel system operation past and present using modern service information and publications.

DTT102 - Preventive Maintenance Credits: 3
This course will give entry level techni- cians a solid foundation into the important task of preventive maintenance, inspection and light service. Systems covered are engine, cab, heating ventilation (HVAC), electrical, frame and suspension.
Prerequisite: DTT 101.

DTT103 - Air Brake and Suspension Systems Credits: 3
The course covers complete under vehicle air brake and suspension systems. Air brake systems principles, service and diagnostics of non antilock and antilock systems will be covered. Theory and principles of suspension systems and wheel alignment with servicing of major components on truck, tractor and trailer are studied.

DTT104 - Diesel Fuel Systems Credits: 3
A theoretical study of specialized diesel components with emphasis on injection pumps, governors and electronic fuel in- jection, dynamic timing, injector nozzle cleaning, trouble-shooting, service and repair.
Prerequisites: DTT 101, AUT 101, 117.

DTT105 - Medium/Heavy Truck Drive Train Credits: 3
This Course will cover the theoretical operation and systematical diagnostic approach to unit repair and service maintenance of clutch, drive line, manual and automated manual transmissions used within the medium/heavy truck industry past and present. Repair procedures will be performed by students.

ECE100 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education Credits: 3
This course, while examining the history and rationale for early childhood programs, provides an introduction to the theories of child development, the types and philosophies of children's programs, and the role of the early childhood professional which create the foundation for Developmentally Appropriate Practice. Designed to provide an overview of the foundation and scope of the field, the course gives students a basic understanding of the field of early childhood education. Observation (PDE Field Experience Stage 1) experience in children's programs for a total of twenty hours is an integral part of the course. * *Prerequisite for all other ECE classes.
Prerequisites: ECE ECR.

ECE101 - Infants and Toddlers Credits: 3
This course examines the development (cognitive, motor, language, emotional-social), growth, education, and care of the child birth to three years of age. Recognizing the importance of interactions during this age this specialized methodology is observed and practiced. It combines theories of infant and toddler development with activities and techniques to use in programs for infants and toddlers. Emphasis is placed on building a relationship with the family and establishing a responsive environment. The Infant/Toddler Environmental Rating Scale-revised (ITERS-R) is examined and used as a tool for assessing infant and toddler programs. Exploration (PDE Field Experience Stage 2) experience in infant and toddler programs for a total of ten hours is an integral part of the course.
Corequisite: ECE 100, ECE ECR.

ECE201 - Music and Movement for Children Credits: 3
This course examines the roles music and movement play in child development across all domains and on brain development, the development of movements, the development and health of the child voice, the importance of movement, music, and rhythm activities for children, and basic music theory. It includes the use of methods and appropriate materials for developing the physical and musical capabilities of the young child through planned activities. Looking at music and movement as both art forms and intelligences, the course examines how the classroom teacher supports the music teacher's role and uses music as an entry point to other curriculum areas. Exploration (PDE Field Experience Stage 2) experience in an early childhood+ education program for a total of ten hours is an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite: ECE ECR, ECE 100.

ECE202 - Artistic Development Credits: 3
This course surveys the creative development of young children and the role it plays across developmental domains. Students explore a variety of art media and techniques with an emphasis on process and communicating with children about their art. There is an emphasis on integrating art throughout the curriculum, authentic assessment through art work, and creating a supportive environment. Exploration (PDE Field Experience Stage 2) experience in an early childhood education+ program for a total of ten hours is an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite: ECE ECR, ECE 100.

ECE203 - Children's Literature: Foundation for Language and Literacy Credits: 3
This course explores the use of quality literature in the young child's environment to foster language and literacy development (speaking, listening, writing, reading). It emphasizes an exposure to, and evaluation of quality children's literature in a variety of genres and examines emergent literacy, language development, and theories of language. The course enables students to transpose theoretical knowledge of children's literature into lively, engaging activities supporting language and literacy development. Assessment of language development, literacy development, and the supportive environment is addressed. Exploration (PDE Field Experience Stage 2) experience in an early childhood+ education program for a total of ten hours is an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite: ECE ECR, ECE 100.

ECE204 - Children's Science and Math Credits: 3
This course explores mathematical and scientific concepts and skills in relation to children's cognitive development. It involves materials and methods for incorporating these concepts into the early childhood curriculum. Exploration (PDE Field Experience Stage 2) experience in an early childhood+ education program for a total of ten hours is an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite: ECE ECR, ECE 100.

ECE205 - Health, Safety, and Nutrition Credits: 3
This course examines the implementation of health, safety, and nutrition practices in the early childhood setting and the teaching of health, safety, and nutrition. Emphasizing established health, safety and nutritional regulations and practices in children's programs, it stresses the responsibilities of early childhood professionals in the prevention of disease and accident, and the promotion of positive health, safety, and nutrition habits in children. The Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale (ECERS) is examined and used as a tool for assessing the early childhood environment. Exploration (PDE Field Experience Stage 2) experience in a Pre-K-Grade 4 setting for a total of ten hours is an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite: ECE ECR, ECE 100.

ECE207 - Child, Family, and Community Credits: 3
This course focuses on the role family and society play in the development of the child. The diversity of family structure, socioeconomic status, religion, ethnic and racial origins, culture, etc., stressing and modeling anti-bias, is explored. Strategies for working with family and community in order to enhance child development and the learning environment are examined.
Prerequisite: ECE ECR, ECE 100.

ECE208 - Child Psychology Credits: 3
Refer to PSY 204

ECE210 - Children with Disabilities Credits: 3
This course defines and analyzes exceptional conditions in the young children. Emphasis is placed on the purposes and legislation for early intervention, the IEP/IFSP process, and the interdisciplinary team approach including the role of the family and community. The course includes assessment and instructional techniques as well as current issues and trends in early childhood education. Exploration (PDE Field Experience Stage 2) experience in an early intervention setting or an early childhood education program serving children with IEP's or IFSP's for a total of ten hours is an integral part of the course.
Prerequisites: ECE ECR, ECE 100.

ECE216 - Early Childhood Program Management Credits: 3
This course examines the issues surrounding the development and administration of an early childhood program. Students are given an opportunity to develop knowledge of and skills in the directorship, the development of budgets, funding acquisition, the writing of program policies, the management of a facility, and the formation of professional relationships with staff, parents, volunteers, and the community.
Prerequisites: ECE ECR, ECE 100

ECE219 - Practicum I: Observation, Assessment and Recordkeeping Credits: 3
This course integrates practical experience and theoretical knowledge as the student works directly with young children for 10 hours a week in early childhood education settings such as: Head Start, kindergarten, primary grades, preschools, Pre-K counts classrooms, day cares, and programs for children with disabilities. Working with a qualified cooperative teacher and supervised by ECE faculty, students focus observation, assessment, and documentation in the early childhood setting. Students explore and practice using various observation, assessment, and documentation tools. Weekly seminars focus on the theoretical basis of observation and assessment. Pre-student teaching (PDE Field Experience Stage 3) experience in an early childhood setting for a total of 140 hours is an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite: ECE ECR, ECE 100, and four ECE courses. Students must maintain a 'C' grade in all ECE courses.

ECE220 - Practicum II: Understanding the Role of Play in Learning Credits: 3
This course integrates practical experience and theoretical knowledge as the student works directly with young children for 10 hours a week in early childhood education settings such as: Head Start, Kindergarten, primary grades, preschools, Pre-K counts classrooms, day cares, and programs for children with disabilities. Working with a qualified cooperative teacher and supervised by LCCC faculty, students focus on the role of play in learning. Students examine and develop environments, materials, interactions, and planning which foster meaningful play. Weekly seminars give students opportunity to discuss theory, strategies, curriculum, and observations related to play. Pre-student teaching (PDE Field Experience Stage 3) experience in an early childhood setting for a total of 135 hours is an integral part of the course.
Prerequisites: ECE ECR, ECE 100, ECE 219 and four additional ECE course. Students must maintain a 'C' grade in all ECE courses in order to take ECE 220.

ECEECR - Early Childhood Regulations Credits: 0
This course ensures that students entering the Early Childhood Education Program meet the required credentialing for employees in the field or for students entering a PA Pre-K-Grade 4 certificate program. Students who register for ECE 100 (Introduction to Early Childhood Education) will be required to register for ECE ECR. This is a Pass/Repeat course. Note: Current requirements are the Department of Public Welfare Child Abuse Clearance, the Pennsylvania State Police Criminal Clearance, the FBI Fingerprinting, the PA online child abuse training certificate, a health appraisal, and a negative TB screening.
Corequisite: ECE 100.

ECO151 - Principles of Economics I (Macro) Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the study of macroeconomics, the social science that explores the behavior of the economy as a whole. Macroeconomics is primarily concerned with two major topics: long-run economic performance and the short-run fluctuations in output and employment associated with the business cycle. Students will develop an understanding of the data and techniques used to measure short-term and long-term economic performance. Students will explore the functioning of the market economy along with the role that governments play in the macro-economy.

ECO152 - Principles of Economics II (Micro) Credits: 3
Introduction to fundamental economic concepts designed to acquaint the student with the functioning of the business firm in the economy, with distribution theory, and with the elements of international trade and finance; supply and demand analysis is stressed to explain the operation of the price system in its classic function of determining what shall be produced for whom and how; current economic problems, economic growth and development, and comparative economics systems.
Pre requisites: ECO-151 Principles of Economics I (Macro)

EDU150 - Introduction to Education* Credits: 3
An introductory course in the field of education. It will present an overview of the historical, philosophical and social foundations of education. Current trends, legislation, governance and financing of schools, opportunities for employment, and certification processes are explored. Particular emphasis will be placed on the professional role of the teacher. Practical experience in area educational settings for a total of twenty hours is an integral part of the course.

EDU151 - Educational Technology Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to educational technology. In addition to preparing students to select and use equipment and software, this course prepares students to effectively use technology as a teaching tool.

EDU251 - Curriculum Credits: 3
This course serves as an introduction to the foundations, structures, and expectations of curriculum, including individualized education programs used with student with disabilities. Curriculum regulations, purposes and structures will also be discussed. The course prepares students to develop and use the curriculum and materials to plan, implement and assess units and lessons. Students will also learn to develop, administer and use the results of the formal and informal tests,establish classrooms and conduct non-instructional duties performed by classroom teachers. Materials and resources used by teachers will be highlighted.

EDU261 - Teaching Credits: 3
This course prepares students to plan and implement units and lessons that follow models for group-oriented direct instruction in content areas. During this course students prepare and actually teach a series of demonstration lessons.

EDU271 - Classroom Management Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the basic roles and responsibilites of classroom teachers as they relate to managing classrooms and behaviors. Students explore the challenges they are likely to face as classroom teachers, including those presented by the students with disabilites and prepare to understand and use a series of theory and research-based routines and techniques to manage students' behaviors across levels and settings.

CEL101 - D.C. and A.C. Fundamentals Credits: 4
Study of basic electrical laws, terms, meters, instruments and their application to DC and AC circuits. Other topics include batteries, electrostatics, commercial and industrial power use, direct current machinery and alternating current machinery. Concurrent with MAT 103 (Trade).

CEL103 - Basic Construction Wiring Credits: 3
A study of the proper care and use of hand tools, splicing of wires, blueprint reading, residential lighting and receptacle circuits, low voltage switching and con­trol circuits, safety practices, and lifesaving techniques. Additional laboratory ex­perience is obtained in the installation of house wiring circuits, wiring boxes, romex cable, fluorescent and incandescent lights, and switches.
Corequisite: MAT 103 (Trade) or permission of instructor.

CEL112 - Advanced Electrical Construction Credits: 4
Practice in installation of rigid conduit and other electrical wireways, pulling in and wiring of motor controllers and other electrical equipment; additional study of electrical blueprints.
Prerequisite CEL 103 - Concurrent with MAT 103 (Trade) or permission of instructor.

CEL116 - National Electrical Code 1 Credits: 2
The study of the National Electric Code as it applies to residential wiring for single dwelling occupancies and wiring for multi-dwelling occupancies including multi-media service entrances, sub panels, sub feeders, and swimming pools.

CEL119 - National Electrical Code 2 Credits: 2
The study of the National Electrical Code as it applies to commercial and industrial standard locations, included are service entrances, lighting, non-metallic raceways, and standard electric requirements.
Prerequisite: CEL 116 or permission of instructor.

CEL120 - Electric Motors Credits: 3
A basic study of electric motors used for residential and industrial applications including motor protection, trouble shooting, maintenance, starting methods and connections.
Prerequisite: MAT 103 (Trade), CEL 101 or permission of instructor.

CEL121 - Electrical Motor Control I Credits: 4
A study in controlling, including motion control reversing, speed control, and braking circuits. Students will be assigned individual projects.
Prerequisite: MAT 103 or 111, CEL 101 or EET 120 or permission of instructor.

CEL122 - Electric Motor Control II Credits: 4
A study in controlling large electric motors using reduced voltage starting meth­ods, high capacity motor starters, speed control, wound rotor controllers, and over load protections.
Prerequisite: MAT 103 (Trade), CEL 121 or permission of instructor.

CEL123 - National Electrical Code Credits: 2
The study of the National Electric Code as it applies to Special Occupancies including hazardous locations, service stations, place of public assembly, health care facilities, mobile parks, and similar locations.
Prerequisite: CEL 116, CEL 120 or permission of instructor.

CEL130 - Power Systems Credits: 3
A basic study of commercial and industrial power suppling systems. Included are three phase service entrances, self-contained and instrument type of utility metering, grounding methods, raceways, switchboard, and panel boards and over current protection on distribution.
Prerequisite: MAT 103 (Trade), CEL 101 or permission of instructor.

CEL132 - Transformers Credits: 3
A basic study of transformers used in electrical systems; included are single and three phase connections, methods of bucking or boosting voltages, transformers, instrument transformers, protection, troubleshooting, and maintenance.
Prerequisite: MAT 103 (Trade), CEL 101 or permission of instructor.

CEL201 - Industrial Electricity Credits: 4
This course provides student with a fundamental understanding of electrical installations and maintenance in an industrial environment. The course will cover electrical safety, installation of switches, receptacles, lights, electrical conduit, wire-ways, fuses, circuit breakers, electric motors, relay circuits, logic circuits, and troubleshooting. Students will be provided with an understanding of how to apply the applicable National Electrical Codes to installations.
Pre requisites: CEL-101, MAT-111

EET120 - Electrical Theory Credits: 4
A study of the principles of AC and DC electricity, as applied to theories of magnetism, electrical circuits, electrical components and the operation of electrical equipment.

EET125 - Electronics for Music Recording Credits: 4
This introductory course will cover the basic principles of electricity and electronics used in audio recording. It will provide the student with theoretical and practical experiences necessary to fully understand the tools, equipment and trouble­shooting skills necessary to build a solid foundation for the future study of audio recording and sound reproduction.

EET131 - D.C. Electricity Credits: 4
Fundamentals of direct current in which electric and magnetic circuit properties are studied; topics include electron theory, electrical units, resistance, Ohm's Law, Kirchhoff's Law, network theorems, energy and power, magnetic circuits and electrical measurements; laboratory experiments coordinate lecture material with practical experience in circuits and instrumentation.
Prerequisite: MAT 111 or concurrent enrollment therein.

EET132 - A.C. Electricity Credits: 4
A study of passive components, resistance, inductance and capacities under transient and sinusoidal voltage conditions; series and parallel circuits in resonant and non-resonant conditions are studied using phasor algebra for problem solution; other topics include circuit Q, power factor correction, transformers, filter, pulse waveforms, and polyphase systems.
Prerequisites: EET 131; MAT 111, 112 or concurrent enrollment therein.

EET135 - Electronic Devices Credits: 4
Introduction to the theory and application of solid state electronic devices including various classifications of diodes, optoelectronic devices, bipolar junctions, field-effect transistors, silicon controlled rectifiers and other thyristors.
Prerequisites: EET 120 or EET 131, and MAT 111.

EET201 - Electronic Amplifier Circuits Credits: 4
A study of the fundamental transistor and integrated circuit amplifiers including direct coupled amplifiers, differential amplifiers, operational amplifiers, audio frequency and high frequency amplifier circuits, power amplifiers, active filters, oscillators, and voltage-to-frequency conversion.
Prerequisites: EET 132, 135.

EET205 - Digital Circuits Credits: 3
Integrated logic components and circuits are studied including basic logic gates (AND, OR, NOT, etc.) and storage components as flip-flops and latches. The representation of the operation of logic circuits in terms of Boolean algebra is presented.
Corerequisite: EET 120 or EET 132.

EET224 - Electronic Communications Credits: 4
Principles of generation, transmission and reception of electromagnetic energy at radio and microwave frequencies; included are coaxial and wave guide transmission lines, basic antenna theory, radio frequency and microwave transmitters and receivers and measurements of radio and microwave parameters. Includes an introduction to data communications.
Prerequisites: MAT 112; EET 201, 205.

EET226 - Microcontrollers Credits: 4
An introduction to the principles of microprocessors such as understanding the basic architecture, registers of a CPU, assembly language programming, stack operations, loops, PSW register, I/O port programming, addressing modes, and arithmetic modes. The course also introduces higher level programming to a microprocessor and applications. Last, stu- dents will program their own virtual CPU via HDL programming code.
Prerequisites: MAT 112; EET 201, 205.

EET228 - Industrial Electronics & Process Control Credits: 4
A study of methods used for sensing and controlling physical and industrial processes; topics include transducers, introduction to motors and generators, power control circuits, feedback control systems, relay ladder logic, and programmable logic controllers.
Prerequisites: MAT 112; EET 201, 205.

EMS101 - Emergency Medical Technician Credits: 6
This class is designed to serve as the initial basic emergency care training program which directly follows the National Standard Curriculum and concludes with Pennsylvania State Certification as an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT). Emphasis is on accurate observations, evaluation of emergency situations, effective communications with the medical network, and high skill proficiency. This class also serves as a required building block to the Paramedic Class.

EMS103 - EMS Pharmacology Credits: 3
This class is designed to provide the student with the basic knowledge of pharmacological agents used within the field of emergency care. This class covers medications used specifically by prehospital care providers and the numerous substances used by their patients.

EMS201 - Emergency Medical Technician Paramedic Part A Credits: 7
This is the first part of a three-part program, which follows the National Registry Curriculum for training Advanced Life Support Technicians for practice under the direct supervision of a physician. Students are trained in advanced emergency care with emphasis on preparatory aspects of this field. Course work prepares the student for the clinical practicum which develops proficiency in those skills learned in the classroom. The practicum includes both clinical and field training in affiliated hospitals and advanced life support units.
Prerequisite: EMS 101.

EMS202 - Emergency Medical Technician Paramedic Part B Credits: 7
This is the second part of a three-part program, which follows the National Registry Curriculum for training Advanced Life Support Technicians (paramedics) for practice under the direct supervision of a physician. Students are training in advanced emergency care with emphasis on trauma and cardiopulmonary related emergencies. Course work prepares the student for the clinical practicum, which develops proficiency in those skills learned in the classroom. The practicum includes both clinical and field training in affiliated hospitals and advanced life support units.

EMS203 - Emergency Medical Technician Paramedic Part C Credits: 7
This is the third part of a three-part program, which follows the National Registry Curriculum for training Advanced Life Support Technicians (paramedics) for practice under the direct supervision of a physician. Students are trained in advanced emergency care with emphasis on infant and pediatric related emergencies. Course work prepares the student for the clinical practicum, which develops proficiency in those skills learned in the classroom. The practicum includes both clinical and field training in affiliated hospitals and advanced life support units.
Corequisites: EMS 205, EMS 212.

EMS204 - Emergency Medical Services Management Credits: 3
This class is designed to demonstrate to the student all the aspects and components of a typical Emergency Services (EMS) System. This class will include the legislative aspects, medical control and accountability, communications, technol­ogy, and an overall description of numerous functioning EMS Systems.

EMS205 - Advanced Paramedic Practice Credits: 5
This course is designed to provide a structured review of both paramedic case work in the field and EMS administrative procedures. The paramedic or student paramedic will have the opportunity to expand his/her experiential knowledge in a protected and supervised environment.

EMS207 - Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (C.P.R.) Credits: 1
This course is designed to prepare the untrained student in the procedures needed to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) based upon the National Stan­dards approved by the American Red Cross or the American Heart Association.

EMS209 - Emergency Vehicle Operations Class Credits: 1
The EVO class is designed to train those involved with Public Safety the differ­ent and complicated aspects of driving an emergency vehicle. Classroom instruc­tion is provided initially to train the student about the risks, needs, legal aspects, and physical forces associated with vehicle operations. Practical exercises follow the didactic position in order to reinforce the principles and theories taught in class.

EMS210 - International Trauma Life Support (ITLS) Credits: 1
Basic Trauma Life Support (BTLS) is a program designed to reduce death and disability for patients who suffer traumatic emergencies such as accidents, drown­ing, and other injury related illnesses. This course is administered as an adjunct to the current training of those providing Advanced Life Support.
Pre or Corequisite: EMS 202.

EMS211 - Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Credits: 1
Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) is a program designed to reduce death and disability for patients who suffer cardiovascular emergencies such as cardiac arrest, acute coronary syndromes, or stroke. This course is administered as an ad­junct to the current training of those providing Advanced Life Support.
Pre or Corequisite: EMS 202.

EMS212 - Pediatric Advanced Life Support Credits: 1
Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) is a program designed to reduce death and disability for pediatric patients who suffer injury related emergencies such as trauma, burns, and fractures from accidents. This course is administered as an adjunct to the current training of those providing Advanced Life Support.
Pre or Corequisite: EMS 202.

EGR110 - Engineering Graphics Credits: 3
Drafting techniques and standards will be practiced utilizing the current edition of Autodesk CAD software as the drafting tool. Student will learn how to create technical drawings that accompany introductory commands associated with fundamental engineering design applications. Topics include engineering design processes, methods and decision making using team design projects. Graphical, verbal and written design communication methods are also covered. Applications of topics are supported using team-oriented design projects.

EGR220 - Statics Credits: 3
This course will study the principles of mechanics to analyze forces on non-moving rigid bodies. Topics will include the resolution of forces and moments into components, and detailed study of the conditions for securing and maintaining static equilibrium. Prerequisites: MAT 151 or MAT 111.

EGR225 - Electrical Circuits & Devices Credits: 4
An introduction to the principles of electrical circuit analysis, linear networks, electronic devices, amplifiers, time domain transient and steady state responses.
Prerequisite: MAT 251.
Corequisite: MAT 279.

EGR235 - Strength of Materials Credits: 3
This course develops an understanding of the fundamental theories and principles of mechanics of materials as well as the basic modes of design for various engineering structures loaded under different conditions.
Prerequisite: EGR 220.

EGR245 - Thermodynamics Credits: 3
The basic subject matter of Thermodynamics will be studied. Applications in various professional fields as well as advanced topics such as those related to materials, surface phenomena, plasmas, and cryogenics will be addressed.
Prerequisite: EGR 220.

GET101 - Technology & Society Credits: 1
The course is designed to introduce the relationship between technology and modern society. Starting with a brief history it explores the benefits and unforeseen negatives of various technologies. An examination of the current state of technology within various disciplines will also be included. Functions of professionals within Engineering Technology will be addressed. The value of professional organizations and industry certifications will also be examined.

GET107 - Electronic Drafting for Engineering Technology Credits: 2
The basics of engineering drawing with the use of a computer. The mechanics of producing a technical report. Elementary operations necessary to produce an elec­tronic diagram using AutoCAD® and other CAD software programs will be presented. The techniques of importing CAD drawings into a word processor will be presented. Other specialized word processor functions needed to produce a technical report will be covered including subscripts, superscripts, tables, Greek letters and equations.

GET109 - Blueprint Reading and Estimating Credits: 3
Designed to develop a knowledge and understanding of architectural blueprints. Scale drawing, types of blueprints for estimating purposes is covered. This course will cover the basic blueprint reading requirements for the certificate programs in plumbing and heating and construction electrician.

GET112 - Industrial Safety Credits: 1
This course is designed to provide instruction in industrial safety and accident prevention for employees and managers. Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) of 1970 requirements are stressed. Administrative aspects of record keeping, rights and responsibilities, standards, safety program development and implementation are also covered. The student will receive basic instruction on the identification of accident causes and become aware of the steps required to prevent industrial accidents.

GET114 - Industrial Workplace Safety Credits: 2
In this course students will learn recognition, avoidance, abatement and prevention of safety and health hazards in the workplace. It includes information on workers' rights and employer responsibilities. This course gives you the specific steps and requirements you must meet to complete the OSHA 30 hour training program.

GET118 - Descriptive Geometry Credits: 2
A study of practical descriptive geometry as used by the draftsperson. Includes the theory of auxiliary view, true length, shape, and point of intersection developed from point-line-plane through the use of revolution; introduces methods for the graphical solution of vector problems.
Prerequisite: GET 113.

GET121 - Manufacturing Processes I Credits: 3
This course will provide the student with an introduction to manufacturing and machining. Topics covered focus on building skills that prepare the student to enter the world of manufacturing. The course has lecture and laboratory components that focus on teaching basic machining setups, safety and operations. Students participate on manually operated machinery to learn drilling, turning, and milling. Additional topics include skills like measuring, reading drawings, benchwork, and following a job plan.

GET122 - Manufacturing Processes II Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide the student with theoretical and selected practical exercises dealing with various manufacturing operations and processes. The degree of exposure to individual operations and processes will range from assigned textbook and reference readings to laboratory exercises. Topics of coverage will include inspection, hot and cold forming, welding, fastening, machining, casting, molding, finishing, assembly, material handling, packaging, process flow, planning, economic justification and related topics. Conventional and newer methods of production will be covered with an emphasis of how computerized equipment can be integrated into the factory environment. Field trips to various industries will supplement instruction.

GET201 - Introduction to Robotics Credits: 3
Formerly ASR-101 - This course is designed to provide instruction on industrial robots and the work cell systems in which they operate. Robots and associated cell equipment will be defined and classified. The advantages and disadvantages of various pieces of equipment and various systems will be discussed. An overview of sensors and programming languages will be provided. Basic accident prevention, practices and procedures, as well as human factors associated with robots and automated systems will also be addressed.

GET203 - Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers Credits: 3
Formerly ASR-203 - This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge and hands-on experience with programmable logic controllers. To round off the students' educational experiences, drum sequence controllers, programmable logic controllers, as well as an introduction to programmable industrial computers (PICs) will be covered. Topics of coverage will include coding of information, decision-making concepts, hardware, software, installation, start-up, maintenance, data highways, and selection of programmable logic controllers (PLCs).

GET207 - Fluid Power Application Credits: 3
Formerly ASR-207 - This course is designed to provide an introduction to basic theories and principles associated with hydraulic and pneumatic systems. An emphasis on understanding system function, operation, application, maintenance, as well as an overview of troubleshooting techniques will be stressed. Students will actively analyze system performance. Topics of coverage will include force transmission through a fluid, prime movers, energy creators, devices for controlling fluid energy, fluid conditioning, fluid conductors, and output devices.

GET209 - Industrial Mechanics Credits: 4
This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of industrial mechanical concepts, principles, and equipment. The course will cover basic mechanical theory including topics such as lubrication, bearings and seals, flexible belt and mechanical drives, vibration, alignment and troubleshooting techniques.

GET234 - Introduction to Computer Programming Credits: 3
Introduction to computer languages with emphasis on BASIC. Short programs to solve engineering problems will be written.

GET252 - Introduction to Nanofabrication Processing Credits: 1
This course will provide an overview of the skills and knowledge used in the nonofabrication processing industry. The introduction to the concepts used in wafer fabrication will include thermal processes, photolithography, plasma basics, ion implant, etch and CVD. Comparisons between top down vs. bottom up processing are included.
Prerequisites: MAT 107, permission of instructor.

EDM112 - 3-Dimensional Modeling and Prototyping Credits: 3
This course will offer the student a chance to study Computer Aided Design (CAD) techniques to assist in design and modeling concepts. Studies will focus on: design approaches, methodologies, and techniques to help CAD designers/engineers and draftspersons achieve their engineering tasks in the fastest, easiest, and most effective way. An overview of command sequences will provide the student fundamental skills to achieve CAD and modeling tasks.
Prerequisites: EGR-110

EDM203 - CNC Machining I Credits: 4
Formerly AMT-103 - This course is designed to provide introductory instruction relevant to the information, practices, and procedures utilized to perform CNC programming, maintenance, setup, and operation of machine tools. Programming emphasis will include basic manual programming of machining centers, milling machines, and turning centers. Topics of coverage will include analysis of part geometry, material, finish, accuracy, tooling, documentation, machine setup, and protective verification using control simulators.
Pre requisites: GET-121

EDM204 - CNC Machining II Credits: 4
Formerly AMT-104 - Designed as a follow-up to CNC Machining I, this course will provide the student with advanced concepts and practices in off-line programming of CNC milling machines Routers and Lathes. Topics of coverage will include part analysis, with regard to selection and definition of working operations, workpiece holding, tool requirements, machine selection, documentation, advanced computer programming of CNC mill, Router, and Lathe, as well as prototype verification using control simulators on respective CNC machine tools.
Pre requisites: EDM-203

EDM230 - Computerized Advanced Drafting Credits: 4
Formerly CDT-203 - This course is a continuation of GET 113 Technical Drafting. Content includes advanced dimensioning, tolerancing, threads, fasteners, and the production of working drawings. Lab assignments will include the utilization and practice of CAD techniques to speed productions of drawings, and apply CAD techniques in an efficient manner consistent with industrial practice.

EDM240 - Computerized Design Problems Credits: 4
Formerly CDT-204 - The focus of this course is the solution of problems relative to the design of devices and products. Lecture content includes the theory, process, and execution of ideas to create devices and products. Laboratory exercises will involve the production of design drawings and the solution of design problems utilizing techniques unique to CAD.
Pre requisites: EDM-230

ENG029 - Basic Writing Skills Credits: 3

*** Course Under Revision *** A basic review of grammar is coupled with intensive practice in sentence recog­nition and development (patterns). Clear communication in everyday situations is included. Grammar and communication skills are combined with the ultimate goal of writing short paragraphs. This course does not apply toward graduation.

ENG030 - Fundamentals of Writing Credits: 3

*** Course Under Revision *** Through practice in the fundamental concepts of writing, this course emphasizes paragraph development techniques, sentence structure, mechanics and usage of language. Students prepare paragraphs leading to complete essays in terms of descriptive, narrative and expositive writing. Classwork may include conferencing, collaborative and individual writing, revising and editing of papers, reading and discussion. Students must complete the course and a mandatory writing test given at the end of the semester successfully. This course prepares the student for ENG101 Composition I, but does not apply toward graduation.
Prerequisites: Placement by exam or ENG 029 with a 'C' grade or higher.

ENG100 - Effective Writing Skills Credits: 1

*** Course Under Revision *** This course provides the necessary skills and selected approaches to English grammar as it applies to required college writing for students who are in need of further development of using Standard English.
Along with English 101, this course provides a review of grammar, punctuation, and usage skills as well as spelling hints. To develop further writing capabilities for academics and careers seeking the demand for English skills competency.
Co requisites: ENG-101

ENG101 - English Composition Credits: 3
Principles of rhetoric, grammar and usage; the development of vocabulary and extensive use of selected reading materials and study of research methods are stressed as fundamentals in the writing of themes as well as extended papers. Students will be required to take a writing competency exam as part of the course
Pre requisites: ENG-030 with 'C' or higher or Placement by exam

ENG102 - Advanced Composition: Contemporary Issues Credits: 3
Students will develop writing, research, and critical thinking skills through diverse reading assignments, writing assignments, and class discussion in this writing intensive course. The methods of the academic processes of inquiry, argument, and persuasion will be discussed and employed, culminating in an extended paper employing multiple patterns, such as cause/effect and analogy, utilizing secondary sources. Critical thinking and writing skills to be achieved by students reading and discussing cultural/contemporary issues/articles as the basis for the argumentative/persuasive process. Students will support their analyses and assert their conclusions through the use of argumentative methodology/terminology and careful and well-documented research, using Modern Language Association (MLA) citation methods.
Pre requisites: ENG-101

ENG104 - Advanced Composition: Literature Credits: 3
Students will develop writing, research, and critical thinking skills through diverse reading assignments, writing assignments, and class discussion in this writing intensive course. The methods of the academic processes of inquiry, argument, and persuasion will be discussed and employed, culminating in an extended paper employing multiple patterns, such as cause/effect and analogy, utilizing secondary sources. Critical thinking and writing skills to be achieved by students reading and discussing literary works/articles as the basis for the argumentative/persuasive process. Students will support their analyses and assert their conclusions through the use of argumentative methodology/terminology and careful and well-documented research, using Modern Language Association (MLA) citation methods.
Pre requisites: ENG-101

ENG120 - Critical Analysis of Literature Credits: 3
Through intertextuality students will read and respond to a text in writing, fo­cusing on critical and divergent thinking over increasingly difficult materials. On­going conversations with texts are stressed to aid students in forming connections within and across works and recognizing archetypal story lines generating insight­ful student writing. Texts will be defined broadly to include works of fiction and nonfiction prose and/or poetry. Analysis, synthesis, and evaluation questioning skills will aid students in developing larger ideas of cultural conversations through a variety of reading assignments.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

ENG200 - The English Language and Its Grammar Credits: 3
This course focuses on the basic elements of standard English grammar, syntax, and sentence structure, and emphasizes the parts of speech, syntactical relationships, punctuation, coherence, and style in writing. Included are the uses of active and passive voice, as well as the fundamentals of diagramming - from the traditional Reed-Kellogg method to the contemporary use of tree diagrams, for a better understanding of the complexities of the written and spoken word. This course will help students improve their comprehension and knowledge of standard formal grammar and assist their efforts to become more effective and better writers. This course would be of interest not only to English, education, journalism, and technical writing students, but also anyone who wishes to improve his/her editing and proofreading abilities.
Prerequisites: ENG 101

ENG221 - Literature of the Western World I Credits: 3
The reading, study, and discussion of masterpieces of literature from ancient Classics, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance. Particular attention is paid, but not restricted, to major historical periods, important literary artists, the development of various genres, and philosophical movements. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 104.

ENG222 - Literature of the Western World II Credits: 3
The reading, study, and discussion of masterpieces of literature from the Neo­classical, Romantic, Realistic, Naturalistic and Modern periods. Particular at­tention is paid, but not restricted, to major historical periods; important literary artists, the development of various genres, such as the short story and novel; and philosophical movements. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 104.

ENG223 - American Literature I Credits: 3
Includes the work of major authors from the seventeenth through mid-nineteenth centuries; teaching in American literary history and supplementary reading in the American novel are also assigned; works that are read and discussed are considered for their inherent worth and for their significance to the evolving na­tional culture. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 104.

ENG224 - American Literature II Credits: 3
Begins with poetry of Whitman and concludes with works of writers who were active prior to World War II; collateral readings in plays and novels, the writing of extended papers and readings in literary history are also required. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 104.

ENG225 - British Literature I Credits: 3
Includes reading and discussion of representative authors and works from the Old English period to the end of the 18th century; reading in literary history may be assigned; attention is paid to the development of various literary and historical characteristics in the different periods of British literature. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 104.

ENG226 - British Literature II Credits: 3
Begins with a study of the Romantic Period and continues through a consider­ation of contemporary British writers; collateral readings in plays and novels may be required; attention is focused on the development of various literary and his­torical characteristics in the different periods of British literature. This is a writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 104.

ENG227 - Shakespeare Credits: 3
This class offers a reading of plays so selected as to be representative of the major phases of Shakespeare's career and to the genre in which he worked. Students will have the opportunity to examine his poetry, plays, and the performances of plays, and criticisms of Shakespeare's work in this writing intensive course.
Prerequisite: ENG 102 or 104.

ENG229 - The Short Story Credits: 3
Traces the development of the short story in 19th and 20th century European and American literature. Acquaints students with bibliographical and critical sources related to the short story. Representative selections read; short critical papers written.

ENG233 - Poetry Credits: 3
This writing intensive course is a study of poetry representing a variety of forms and periods by way of in-depth analysis and interpretation. For better understanding and study, students apply literary terminology to explicate poetry. In addition, students will support their analysis and assert their conclusions through careful and well-documented research using Modern Language Association (MLA) citation methods.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 104.

ENG242 - Modern Drama Credits: 3
This course will include discussion of contemporary theatre as well as se­lected classical plays. Attendance at amateur and professional theatre produc­tions will supplement the readings. Participation in various dramatic exercises will be encouraged.

ENG251 - Creative Writing Credits: 3
Open to students who have demonstrated their capacity and interest in writing. Students will study the different forms of creative writing, particularly poetry and short fiction for style and theme, in order to produce their own individual works. Through the class, students will create a portfolio of original works of poetry and fiction pieces. The process of publishing personal writing is discussed, and students who wish may undertake original work for possible publication in a student­sponsored project.
Prerequisites: ENG 102 or ENG 104.

ENG261 - Technical Communications Credits: 3
Technical Communications provides the student with experience in preparing and drafting documents particular to most business settings. The course examines the differences in style from prose or academic settings to the workplace. Students will experience completion of projects in both individual and collaborative formats using word processing and presentation software. These assignments provide the opportunity to practice writing and communication skills.
Prerequisite: ENG 101.

ESL020 - Academic Skills and Communication for ESL Students Credits: 3
This course is designed to help ESL students improve their listening skills, oral communication skills, basic reading comprehension, and writing and grammar skills in a risk free academic environment. Students are assessed using a basic reading inventory to determine their level of English reading proficiency, and instruction is designed to build the student's general and instructional communication skills. Basic vocabulary building exercises, extensive discussion of text samples, in which both informational and fictional text is reviewed, and writing exercises designed to build proficiency in written English communication are emphasized. The basic reading inventory will be used as a post-test in order to measure growth in English language proficiency. This course does not apply toward graduation. Corequisite: RDG 019.

ESL030 - Advanced Academic Skills and Communication for ESL Students Credits: 3
This course is designed to help ESL students improve their listening skills, oral communication skills, basic reading comprehension, and writing and grammar skills in an academic environment. Students moving into this class from ESL-020 will notice that the focus of the work is now on communication in the college classroom. Students are assessed using pretests in reading comprehension and vocabulary knowledge, and a writing sample is taken to determine their level of English communication proficiency. Instruction is designed to build the student's academic communication skills. Academic vocabulary building exercises, extensive discussion of text samples, in which both college level academic and literary text is reviewed, and writing exercise, designed to increase grammatically correct text pieces are emphasized. A post-test of reading comprehension and vocabulary knowledge will be used, along with a final writing sample, to determine the student's English language proficiency level at the end of the course. This course does not apply toward graduation
Corequisite: RDG 020.

ESL100 - Mastering Academic Skills Credits: 3
This course is designed to help ESL students achieve a high level of competency in four areas of literacy: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Upon completion of ESL 030, students will study advanced text snd vocabulary; in addition, students will build competency in the area of oral academic communication: comprehension of and note-taking during lectures, understanding oral directions, building confidence and competence in oral presentations, and interacting orally with teachers and students in the academic environment, and co-workers in the workplace. Students are assessed using rubrics designed to measure specific literacy behaviors and competencies. Instruction is designed to build the student?s academic communication skills. Academic vocabulary building exercises, extensive discussion of text samples, in which both informational and fictional text is reviewed, and writing exercises designed to build proficiency in written coomunication are emphasized.
Prerequisites: ESL-030 or placement by exam.

ART110 - Art Appreciation Credits: 3
An introduction to the elements of architecture, painting and sculpture; the prin­ciples of the fine and applied arts are considered for their immediate relevance to contemporary life; through various media and through classroom experiences, the student develops his/her awareness of the sensitivity to all forms of art.

ART130 - History of Commercial Art Credits: 3
In History of Commercial Art, the student studies the history of painting,graphic design, and photography, and the evolution of eash discipline. THis course will focus on the influence of the ten schools of painting, the effect that major design schools and studios have on graphic design, and the development of photographic processes as they have contributed to the field of commercial art.

ART150 - The Creative Spirit in Modern and Contemporary Art Credits: 3
This course will examine the major developments in art from Impressionism to the present. Class sessions will include lectures, visual presentations and class dis­cussions.

ART200 - The Movies Credits: 3
Techniques of film making, surveys of history, movements, and genres of mov­ies; analysis of selected performers and directors.

MUS150 - Music Appreciation Credits: 3
An introduction to Western music including the elements of music, various musical styles, medias and forms, stylistic periods, and significant composers.

MUS170 - Introduction to Music Theory and Composition Credits: 3
Introduction to Music Theory and Composition teaches the student the basic fundamentals of music, including notation, scales, keys, and intervals. The course also enables the student to combine these and other elements of music into recognizable melodic and harmonic units.

FST101 - Introduction to Fire Protection and Prevention Credits: 3
An introduction to fire science with emphasis upon municipal fire services, fire defenses through prevention and the basic concepts of combustion and extinguishment defenses through prevention and the basic concepts of combustion and extinguishment.

FST111 - Fire Service Management Credits: 3
An introduction to the management of fire service resources, equipment and personnel; financing of fire service operations; fire related laws of Pennsylvania; personnel leadership and development; public relations for the fire service.

FST112 - Fire Protection Systems Credits: 3
Fire protection engineering including all types of fixed systems for fire prevention, control, suppression and extinguishment; detection signal and extinguishing systems both automatic and manual types; temperature, smoke, products of combustion, and flame responsive alarm signal systems; discusses current trends, deficiencies, and possible solutions for fire protection problems.

FST121 - Fire Fighting Tactics and Strategy Credits: 3
Essential elements in analyzing the nature of fire and determining required water flows; field problems in preplanning; study of special command problems and mutual aid; field exercises with extinguishing methods and efficient use of equipment and available manpower in tactical situations.

FST201 - Building Codes and Construction Credits: 3
Common concepts in building construction, types of structural design materials and fire ratings of building materials, blueprint reading, building codes and the necessity for fire protection will be reviewed.

FST202 - Hazardous Materials Credits: 3
A study of chemical characteristics and reaction to storage, transportation and handling hazardous materials, i.e., flammable liquids, combustible solids, oxidizing and corrosive materials, and radioactive compounds. Emphasis is placed on emergency situations, fire fighting, and control.
Prerequisite: PHY 101.

FST203 - Principles of Inspection Credits: 3
Pre-planning, inspection, organization, techniques, and procedures; field inspection includes diagramming, mapping, and reporting.

FST251 - Fire Investigation and Arson Credits: 3
Stresses the fire fighter's role in combatting the arson problem; investigation techniques, reports, case histories, and court preparation as well as detection, prevention, and preservation of evidence in arson cases; selected discussion of laws, decisions, and opinions other than fire and building codes affecting fire department operations.
Prerequisite: FST 101.

FST255 - Fire Service Hydraulics Credits: 3
Covers fundamentals involving movement of water through a variety of conditions - hose streams, pipe systems and pumps; computing nozzle pressures, liquid pressures and range, and effectiveness of fire streams; determining of water supply requirements for section of a community and for actual fire situations.
Prerequisite: MAT 103.

FST259 - Hydraulics II Credits: 3
A study of hydraulic principles as applied to the design, maintenance and testing of automatic fire protection sprinkler systems with emphasis upon calculations required to design and maintain such systems.
Prerequisites: MAT 103, FST 255.

FYE101 - First Year Experience Credits: 1
This course will assist students in the successful transition to college. This is accomplished by investigation and practice of specific academic skills, by inquiry into life skills necessary for citizenship in any diverse community, and by knowledge of the policies, procedures, opportunities and resources available at Luzerne County Community College.

FYE103 - First Year Experience Enhanced Credits: 3
This course will assist lower academic achieving students in the successful transition to college. This is accomplished by investigation and practice of specific academic skills, by inquiry into life skills necessary for citizenship in any diverse community, and by knowledge of the policies, procedures, opportunities and resources available at Luzerne County Community College at an adjusted depth and breadth to meet this student population needs.

FRE101 - Elementary French I Credits: 3
The first course for students beginning the study of French; the elements of gram­mar and reading, drill in vocabulary, pronunciation, diction and graded readings are studied.

FRE102 - Elementary French II Credits: 3
Stresses the aural-oral approach to reading; the development of the student's ability to read, write and converse on an elementary level of difficulty.
Prerequisite: FRE 101 or its equivalent.

FRE201 - Intermediate French I Credits: 3
The intermediate course presents a thorough review of French syntax, vocabulary, building, phonetics translation, reading, writing and conversation on the level of practical use.
Prerequisite: FRE 102 or its equivalent.

FRE202 - Intermediate French II Credits: 3
In addition to continued study of French syntax, includes conversation, reading and writing in French; selected readings of literary and cultural merit are used to improve the student's proficiency in reading French.
Prerequisite: FRE 201 or its equivalent.

SPA101 - Elementary Spanish I Credits: 3
Designed to teach basic skills; comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. Students will learn to write controlled sentences on selected subjects and vocabulary. Spanish culture and songs are included.

SPA102 - Elementary Spanish II Credits: 3
A further concentration on the acquisition of the basic skills of comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. The aural-oral method is stressed.
Prerequisite: SPA 101 or its equivalent.

SPA201 - Intermediate Spanish I Credits: 3
A review of grammar and literary readings; course will deal with both grammar and literature; the class will be conducted mainly in Spanish and will include a more intensive writing program. Cultural audio-visual materials are utilized.
Prerequisite: SPA 102 or its equivalent.

SPA202 - Intermediate Spanish II Credits: 3
A review of grammar and literary readings; course will include works of representative authors in Hispanic literature, with emphasis on concentration and discussion. Students who complete this course are ready to travel to Spanish-speaking countries.
Prerequisite: SPA 201 or its equivalent.

GEO111 - World Physical Geography Credits: 3
Emphasizes our relationship to the natural environment in the various climatic regions of the world and the interrelationship of these factors with respect to conservation and natural resources.

GEO112 - World Cultural Geography Credits: 3
Cultural Geography is essentially the study of people and our relationship to the land. It is the study of the cultural landscape, i.e., the effects of people upon the environment and vice-versa. It is, in many respects, a continuation of Physical Geography.
Prerequisite: GEO 111 or permission of the instructor.

HCM101 - Introduction to Health Care Systems Credits: 3
This course is a comprehensive introduction to the organization of the US health care system. It will introduce the student to health care management and examine forces that affect healthcare delivery in the United States. The medical care system will be explored from a historical perspective. It will address the current major problems existing in healthcare delivery. Alternative resolutions for future implementation in the healthcare setting will be examined.

HCM201 - Medical Practice Administration Credits: 3
This course introduces the field and the management of contemporary medical practices and examines strategies for a changing environment. It will introduce the student to historical overview of ambulatory care in the US, organizational environment analysis, principles of financial, information systems and human resource management. It will address marketing, strategic management of group practices, and the implications of managed care and integrated delivery systems. The course presents these topics from a managerial perspective.

HCM280 - Internship Credits: 3
This internship is taken in the last semester of the Health Care Management program. It is designed to provide practical work experience in the healthcare community. This internship requires the student to perform healthcare management work directly related to the health care area.
Prerequisites: HCM-101, HCM-201

HIM120 - Medical Terminology Credits: 3
A course designed to teach the most common roots, prefixes, and suffixes in medical terminology. Emphasis is placed on definition, medical abbreviations, spelling, pronunciation, use of the medical dictionary and vocabulary building.

HIM133 - Medical Office Procedures Credits: 3
This course prepares the student to perform administrative functions using the Electronic Health Record (EHR). Students learn how to input patient information, schedule appointments and maintain the EHR. Topics covered include the Medical Assisting Profession, Health Care Settings, History of Medicine, Coping Skills, Therapeutic Communication Skills, Legal and Ethical Considerations, Emergency Procedures, Facility Environment, Electronic Health Record (EHR) and the Patient Chart.
Prerequisite: OMT 119 or placement by exam.

HIM225 - Reimbursement Methodologies Credits: 3
This course prepares the medical office assistant to perform financial reimbursement functions using proper health insurance claim forms and billing guidelines for various third party payers such as: Medicare, governmental plans, commercial carriers, workers' compensation, etc. Focus is also placed on understanding Managed Care. Students learn billing for both physician and hospital claims. Students will be introduced to basic coding techniques. Emphasis is placed on the uses of coded data and health information in reimbursement and payment systems appropriate to all health care settings and managed care.
Corequisite: HIM 120 and HIM 133.

HIM228 - Healthcare Data Content and Delivery System Credits: 3
This course introduces students to the contents, use and structure of the health record, including data and data sets. It explains how these components relate to primary and secondary record systems and gives an overview of the legal and ethical issues applicable to health information. Students are introduced to the organization, financing and delivery of health care services and the organization and activities of hospitals, nursing homes, mental health and ambulatory care centers, home health agencies and hospices.

HIM233 - Electronic Health Records (EHR) Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of HIM-133 Medical Office Procedures. It continues to prepare the student to perform administrative functions. Students will use practice management software. Students will learn to input patient information and perform a variety of billing functions. Topics covered include Administrative Procedures, Telephone Techniques, Patient Scheduling, Medical Records Management, Written Communication, Managing Finances, Office Management, Human Resource Management, Employment Strategies and Computerized Practice Management Software
Prerequisite: HIM 133.

HIM234 - Editing and Scribing Credits: 3
Transcriptions from transcribing machines covering histories, physicals, operative procedures, autopsies, lab reports and letters from specialists. X-ray reports, manuscripts for doctors' publications and other materials are included.
Prerequisite: HIM 120.

HIM238 - CPT Coding Insurance Billing Credits: 3
This course introduces the student to the support function of accounting and patient billing aspects of a medical practice. This course emphasizes practice in the assignment of valid Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes in an ambulatory care setting. Topics covered are evaluation and management services, anesthesia services and modifiers, the integumentary system, the musculoskeletal system, the respiratory ststem, the cardiovascular system, female genital and maternity care and delivery, general surgery, radiology, pathology, laboratory, the medicine section and Level II national codes, as well as third party reimbursement issues.
Prerequisite: HIM 120.
Corequisties: HIM 133 and HIM 225 and BIO 125 or BIO 130.

HIM239 - ICD-CM/PCS Coding Credits: 3
This course will introduce the student to the International Classification of Disease 10th edition that will be mandatory for Medicare and Medicaid insurance claim processing as of October 1, 2014 for reimbursement purposes. This course emphasizes practice in the assignment of valid diagnostic codes (ICD-10-CM). It also introduces students to procedures codes (ICD-10-PCS).
Prerequisite: HIM 120.
Corequisites: HIM 133, HIM 225, BIO 125 or BIO 130.

HIM240 - Advanced ICD-CM & CPT Coding Credits: 3
This course focuses on mastering the essentials of advanced medical coding services. Advanced Medical Coding utilizes higher level, more complex examples (case studies, records and scenarios). It also provides cases which are actual medical records (with personal patient details changed or removed), providing real-world experience coding from physical documentation with advanced material.
Prerequisite: HIM 238 and HIM 239.

HIM290 - Medical Certification Review Credits: 1
This course is designed to prepare the students for the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) CCA (Certified Coding Associate) examination that is offered through AHIMA. Upon completion of the course, students are eligible to sit for a CCA exam. (Spring only)
Prerequisite: HIM 238 and HIM 239.

HIM299 - Healthcare Internship Credits: 3
A student who has the recommendation of the medical office faculty is given guidance in finding an administrative healthcare position. This internship is intended to give the student practical work experience in the healthcare community. The instructor will meet periodically/as needed with students and immediate supervisors to discuss progress during the internship.
Prerequisites: BIO 125 or BIO 130, HIM 120, HIM 225, HIM 228, HIM 233, and HIM 234.

HPE104 - Dynamic Yoga Credits: 1
Dynamic Yoga is a form of Hatha Yoga (physical yoga) with emphasis on fluidity and heat using powerful moves and isometric postures. Dynamic Yoga will promote both cardiovascular and muscular stamina and create a feeling of deep but alert relaxation. Through the balance of awareness, alignment, movement, energy and breath the student will manifest stability, adaptability, radiance grace and overall well-being.

HPE106 - Circuit Weight Training Credits: 2
This course will provide the scientific evidence available from manual and professor to allow the students to become physically educated to make fitness and wellness a lifelong goal. This is a course designed to utilize a timed sequence of weight training exercises and aerobic activities to produce gains in weight training which differs from traditional weight training and uses lighter weight loads with short rest periods between exercises. Participants improve muscular strength and tone, body composition, and cardiovascular endurance.

HPE107 - High/Low Aerobic Dance Credits: 1
A direct program of physical exercise and conditioning to improve and/or maintain physical exercise through simple choreographed dance moves intended to increase heart rate.

HPE108 - Cardio-Kickboxing Credits: 3
This course will consist of a directed program of physical exercise combining aerobics, kickboxing, dance and other components of fitness trainging into one synergistic workout.

HPE110 - Basketball Credits: 1
The purpose of this class is to provide students with a general knowledge and skill level of the game of basketball. As a result of the class, the student will improve their general physical fitness and skill performance. Principles, techniques, safe practices and strategies of basketball will be taught throughout the class. Sportsmanship and enjoyment of the game will be emphasized.

HPE111 - Bowling Credits: 1
For the beginner as well as the advanced bowler; provides instruction in all aspects of bowling including history, bowling techniques, scoring and league play.

HPE113 - Badminton & Golf Credits: 1
(Badminton) Fundamentals, drills, court strategy, team play and rules. (Golf) Basic skills for the beginning golfer; all equipment is supplied.

HPE115 - Active Living Everyday Credits: 1
This course uses a variety of behavior change strategies to help fi t physical activity into your day. It addresses the root causes of physical inactivity and focuses on the skills needed to establish a lifelong habit of physical activity. This course will be offered via distance learning with optional coaching sessions if needed by the student.

HPE118 - Fencing Credits: 1
Basic skills of mobility, offense and defense; judged bouting and match play. Necessary equipment will be provided.

HPE121 - Aerobic Step Training Credits: 1
A direct program of physical exercise and conditioning to improve and/or maintain physical fitness. This course was formerly called Slimnastics.

HPE122 - Fitness for Life - An Individualized Approach Credits: 2
This course is designed to take people from their current level of fitness toward increased cardiovascular endurance, proper weight control, increased strength and flexibility, and the ability to relax. In this course individuals will apply what they learn by writing and engaging in their own personalized programs.

HPE124 - Cardio Sculpt Credits: 1
The course is designed to interweave short, high-intensity total-body anaerobic, aerobic and strengthening segments. This method will keep your heart rate up, even during the strengthening segments. This will allow the student to maximize fat-burning as you build lean muscle. The cardio segments are designed with easy-to-follow choreography and the strengthening intervals maximize efficiency with varied weight levels and multiple-plane motions.

HPE127 - Hatha Yoga I Credits: 1
Hatha Yoga is an ancient practice which concentrates on the physical body. The techniques of Hatha Yoga develop strength, flexibility and balance in the body and mind. It creates inner peace and harmony. This course is an introduction to Hatha Yoga.

HPE128 - Introduction to Exercise Physiology Credits: 3
A survey of the scientific principles and research as applied to exercise physiology and physical fitness. Areas of emphasis will include the muscular system, cardiovascular and pulmonary responses to exercise, measurement of energy, environmental and other influences on performance and the examination of fitness training. The course provides a basis for the study of physical fitness and athletic training.
Prerequisite: (Any One) High School Biology, BIO 101, Permission of Department Chair.

HPE129 - Strength and Conditioning Credits: 1
Application of training principles and the development of safe and effective techniques involved in progressive resistance weight training. Free-weights, resistance machines, and specific strength exercises will be utilized by the student to implement an individualized program for optimal gains in muscular endurance, lean body composition, and motor performance.

HPE130 - Nutrition for Wellness Credits: 2
This course is designed to introduce the student to fundamental, introductory nutrition terms, concepts and dietary strategies. The student will learn about nutrients and complete activities related to their own consumption of those nutrients.

HPE131 - Beginning Golf Credits: 1
This course is designed to teach the students the proper fundamentals of golf, to increase the student's skill level and to develop interest in the life-long activity of golf.

HPE132 - Basic Martial Arts Credits: 1
This course is designed to introduce students to the martial arts. This course teaches the basic blocks, punches and counters of the martial arts. This course also offers hand-to-hand, self-defense techniques which may save your life.

HPE136 - Group Stationary Bicycling Credits: 1
This course will introduce students to the cardiovascular activity of bicycling. It will improve the aerobic capacity of students by cycling in an indoor group exercise class. The class will also give the student the skills for riding a bicycle safely and within the laws of the road. Topics to be covered include riding within a target heart rate, flat, hill, and interval riding, lane riding, traffic laws, trail riding, compenents of a bicycle, and basic mechanicial mainteance.

HPE141 - Volleyball Credits: 1
This course will introduce the participant to basic and intermediate volleyball skills and strategies. Topics to be covered will include historical background of volleyball, serving, forearm pass, overhead pass, setting, attacking, defensive and offensive formations and officiating principles.

HPE151 - Health Promotion, Fitness and Sports Programming Credits: 3
The identification of problems and goals, how goals may be achieved; the problems and practices of family, agency and governmental recreation programs; meeting the needs of modern youth; selection of activities for various age groups in the recreation center and playground situation; advanced planning, promotion, preparation and operation of programs; the development of weekly programs, schedules and special events.

HPE152 - Introduction to Physical Education Credits: 3
Is designed to acquaint the student with the profession. The role of physical education in the educational process. An introduction to the history, philosophy, theory, practice and opportunities for the Physical Educator. (Fall semester only.)

HPE153 - Elementary School Physical Education Credits: 3
Emphasis is on program planning, teaching, techniques, the direction and participation in elementary Physical Education Activities, and the selection of activities that will help satisfy the needs of the elementary school child. Includes practical experience in school gymnasium. (Spring semester only.)

HPE154 - Safety and First Aid Credits: 3
This course is designed to prepare the student to recognize that an emergency exists and to prepare the student to make appropriate decisions regarding first aid care and to act on those decisions. The course will also emphasize the importance of a safe and healthy lifestyle. Students will have the option of American Red Cross certification in adult, infant, child CPR, Responding to Emergencies First Aid, and/ or Automated External Defibrillation.

HPE155 - Personal Health Credits: 3
A study of the meaning and significance of physical; mental and social health as related to the individual and to society stressing the national and personal problems of drugs, alcohol and tobacco, communicable and non-communicable diseases; sexual maturity, and marriage reproduction.

HPE165 - Physical Education for Young Children Credits: 1
This course will prepare the student to teach basic movement patterns, fitness activities and movement games to young children in a school setting. Using a "hands on" approach, its focus will be on the development of skills and strategies that allow a teacher to promote lifelong, enjoyable and beneficial involvement in physical activity for young children.

HPE201 - Personal Training I ? Fitness Assess- ment and Exercise Prescription Credits: 2
This course will cover fitness goals and workouts, cardiovascular training equipment, free weight and fixed weight strength training equipment, basic American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and testing protocols including circumference measurements, skinfolds, and fitness evaluations and interpretation of charts in the classroom and LCCC Fitness Center. At the completion of the course, students will have the opportunity to test for certification as a Personal Trainer Level I through the ACSM organization through a computer implemented examination of a separate fee of $150.
Pre requisites: HPE-128 or BIO-135 or BIO-125

HPE207 - Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (C.P.R.) Credits: 1
This Course is designed to prepare the untrained student in the procedures needed to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) based upon the National Standards approved by the American Red Cross or the American Heart Association.

HPE220 - Voices in Sport and Society Credits: 3
This course is designed to be a virtual summit conference on sports and society. Each lesson includes a videotape program, a chapter from a textbook and student guide, and an optional website component. The videotape programs are designed to create interest in the lesson topics and include the best of 60 hours of panel discussions and interviews with notable sports figures. This course will explore relationship between sport and the world in which it exists.

HPE230 - Badminton Credits: 1
This course is designed to teach each individual the skills and techniques that are required to play and enjoy playing badminton.

HPE231 - Advanced Bowling Credits: 1
To develop a greater skill and technique, knowledge and appreciation of the activity. Etiquette on the lanes and full understanding of competitive league play is taught.

HPE244 - Coaching of Sport Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to allow the student to develop his or her own philosophy of coaching and to develop the skills necessary to be an efficient ethical teacher of young and old athletes. Topics of discussion will include coaching qualities, roles of the coach, the needs of various age groups, sports psychology, ethical considerations and scenarios, teaching skills, community involvement etc. The course will provide comprehensive insight to the job of coaching. (Spring semester only.)

HPE246 - Officiating of Sport Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide special direction for physical education and recreation sports major students and prospective coaches. The course is also a guide for supervisors of school sports, community recreation programs, and individuals preparing to enter the sports officiating field. This course provides the opportunity to become PIAA certified in sports officiating upon successful completion of the state exam.

HPE247 - Fitness and Wellness Credits: 1
This is a one hour lecture course designed to familiarize the student with the various aspects that make up their total fitness. Ex.: 1.) Cardiovascular, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility. 2.) Stress reduction. 3.) Weight control through proper nutrition and exercise. 4.) Health Affects of Alcohol and Tobacco.

HPE248 - Human Sexuality Credits: 3
This course has been designed to present all aspects of sexuality, emphasizing that we are all sexual beings and that sexuality should be viewed in its totality - biological, spiritual, psychological and social-cultural dimensions.

HPE249 - Conditioning and Weight Training for Women Credits: 1
HPE 249 emphasis is on the design and implementation of individualized weight training programs to meet the specific muscular and cardiovascular fitness needs and interests of women.

HPE263 - Introduction to Nutrition Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce the student to college level, scientific principles of nutrition. It will focus on the major nutrients found in food including characteristics, functions and metabolism; interrelationships of nutrients; effects of inadequate and excessive intake; principles of energy metabolism; and current challenges in the field. The course will build on basic knowledge of anatomy and physiology, chemistry and math concepts. The nutrition principles will be applied to student's dietary pattern via a semester long project.

HPEFLS - Fitness Lifestyles Credits: 0
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the various aspects that make up a total fitness program utilizing the college fitness center. The course will not apply towards graduation and will not be limited to the current repeat policy for credit courses. A grade of Pass/Fail will be awarded for tracking purposes so that individuals using the Fitness center can be informed of policies and procedures.

HIS101 - Western Civilization I Credits: 3
This course is a survey of the main stages of the history of western civilization up to the beginning of the 17th Century. It emphasizes the concepts, forces, ideas, events and people that shaped the complex dimensions of the contemporary world. After a brief consideration of the earliest civilization phase, the course explores the classical period, from about 1000 B.C.E. to 500 C.E., the spread of civilization period, 500 to 1400 C.E., and the spread of the Renaissance and Reformation.

HIS102 - Western Civilization II Credits: 3
This course is a continuation of History of Civilization I beginning with the 18th century. It, too, emphasizes the concepts, ideas, events and people that shaped the complex dimensions of the contemporary world. It begins with a consideration of the forces influencing the West's dominance of the globe between 1700 and 1900. It concludes with analysis of the 20th century as each major civilization confronts the forces of modernity.

HIS110 - Introduction to African-American History Credits: 3
This course will examine the history, leadership, trials and triumphs of African-Americans. It begins with the earliest Africans brought to America as slaves, and studies the main themes affecting the lives of African-Americans, emphasizing economic and social trends as well as the various class structures and gender differences. Special consideration will be given to the rise and growth of slavery and segregation, the Civil Rights Movement and on some of the primary African-Americans in history.

HIS190 - Research Methods Credits: 3
This course provides an introduction to research methods for students enrolled in the history concentration or social studies education program. Students will learn how to identify and evaluate primary sources, distinguish the differences between primary and secondary sources, formulate a thesis with a historical context, understand historiography, properly cite sources used and present their findings in a classroom environment. Special emphasis will be placed on a range of primary and secondary sources, including written documents, photographs, quantitative data and material culture. Class sessions will include powerpoint lectures, visits to special collections and research libraries, workshops on research and writing, and student presentation of their research findings.
Pre requisites: 9 credits from HIS-101, HIS-102, HIS-201, HIS-202
Co requisites: 3 credits from HIS-101, HIS-102, HIS-201, HIS-202

HIS201 - American History to 1865 Credits: 3
The development of the United States from the period of discovery and colonization to the end of the Civil War, with attention to the most important political, economic, social, and cultural forces.

HIS202 - American History Since 1865 Credits: 3
The development of the United States from the Reconstruction Era to the present; emphasis is given to late nineteenth and twentieth century industrialization, the expansion of government, the emergence of the industrial-urban society and America's status as a world power.

HIS205 - American Civil War Credits: 3
In this course, attention will be concentrated on the period before, during, and after the American Civil War. It is designed to do justice to all the important aspects of this particular period . . . political, economic, constitutional, diplomatic, social, religious, artistic, and intellectual.

HIS210 - History of Pennsylvania Credits: 3
This is a required course for all social studies education majors. The course provides an in-depth exploration of the history of Pennsylvania and its particularrole in the political, economic and social development of the United States. It also introduces students to pedagogy or methods of teaching Pennsylvania History at the primary and secondary levels. Topics will include William Penn's establishment of the colony, the French-Indian War, and the central role Pennsylvania played in such national events as the American Revolution, the Early Republic, Antebellum reform and the Industrial Revolution. Special emphasis will be placed onconflict and cooperation between different cultures; continuity and change over time; and cause-and-effect relationships between economic, political and social events. Class sessions will include powerpoint lectures, documentary films, living history presentations, simulation exercises and workshops on research and writing.

HIS231 - Luzerne County History Credits: 3
This course deals with the history of Luzerne County in the lower northeastern section of Pennsylvania. The course begins with a consideration of important definitions, themes, and methods of 'Local History' as a field of study. It continues with an overview of various geographic and geologic characteristics of the County and their influence on the County's historic development. Most of the course is an examination and analysis of major events, persons, ideas, institutions, and trends which produced the foundations of the modern Luzerne County community. Chronologically the course covers the period from the 17th century to the late 20th century. Some major topics considered are: the early settlement patterns and the formation of the new county in 1786 and the evolution of the current county boundaries in the 19th century; the Revolutionary War era and the County's role in the war; early political, economic, and social characteristics; the 19th century transformation and growth; the rise and decline of the anthracite coal industry; ethnic diversity; cultural development; the political kaleidoscope of the 19th and 20th centuries; economic depression; the trials and tribulations of economic diversification; and the recent metamorphosis of the County.

HIS238 - World War II Credits: 3
This course intends to provide an insight into the causes of World War II, principle events and key individuals that were the focus of the Conflict and the results upon an entire generation of Americans who either participated, supported or were part of America's involvement. We will examine images of what has been called "Total War" that was brought home in stark reality to Americans the true meaning of Terror, Fascism, and Mass Murder on a scale hitherto, unimaginable. You will examine the results that have had a lingering effect on America's perspective of its economic, political, and military involvement in various parts of the World as a result of this global conflict and its lingering effects on the rest of the century.

HIS240 - The Holocaust Credits: 3
An examination of one of the most overwhelming events in human history; the systematic murder by the Nazis of six million European Jews, murdered solely because of their ethnic identity.

HIS245 - The Anciet Regime and the French Revolution Credits: 3
This course is an analysis of the events leading up the French Revolution, a study of the events and philosophy of the Revolution itself, and the aftermath of the Napoleonic era. It emphasizes the concepts, forces, ideas, events and people that shaped France in the 18th Century, as well as the Napoleonic era of the early 19th Century. It also explores the philosophical questions that arise from one of the most violent events of early modern Europe.

HIS252 - Women in American History Credits: 3
This course is a detail of the history of women in American including Native Americans, African-Americans, and immigrant women. It begins with the earliest colonizers and settlers, and studies the main themes affecting the lives of American women, emphasizing economic and social trends and patterns as well as the various class structures. It will also focus on some of the primary women in American history, including many who have shaped the many womenís movements.

HIS258 - Introduction to Asian History Credits: 3
This course provides an introductory survey of the modern history, economics, politics, and cultures of the Pacific Basinregion. This inter-disciplinary Asian-studies course explores how the Pacific Basin has evolved to emerge as a principal political and economic center of the coming century.

HIS259 - Vietnam Credits: 3
Vietnam provides a full record of the conflict - from background on Vietnam and its people, through the French presence, to a chronology of the period from 1945 to 1975, with an examination of the impact of the war on American society in the years which followed. The series places Vietnam in the perspective of history and permits viewers to form their own conclusions about the basis for the conflict, what was won and lost, and by whom.

HIS260 - The Korean War Credits: 3
An examination of post World War II events that lead to the Cold War, and also the political, social, economic, and military developments that became The War in Korea: The Forgotten WAR, sometimes referred to, alternately, as The Korean Police Action which lasted from June 25th, 1950 to July 27th, 1953. The Korean War marked a turning point in twentieth-century history as the first shooting confrontation of the Cold War, and was the only time since the Second World War that two of the world's major military powers, the U.S. and China, have fought. It continues to be America's longest unresolved war.

HRM101 - Fundamentals of Food Credits: 3
Various types of foods - their composition, use in meals, preparation and the scientific principles (physical, chemical and bacteriological) involved in their preparation; food processing prior to marketing; laboratory exercises supplement classroom theory.

HRM105 - Food Sanitation and Safety Credits: 3
Basic principles of microbiology and their relationship to the Food Service Industry; causes and control of food-borne illness; sanitary practices in food preparation; dishwashing procedures; sanitation of kitchen, dining room and equipment; sanitary regulations; personal hygiene; safety procedures; OSHA regulations and reporting procedures.

HRM109 - Nutrition and Menu Planning Credits: 3
Elementary nutrition and its application to menu planning; composition, minimum requirements and food sources of essential nutrients; theory and principles of menu planning.

HRM110 - Human Resource Management Credits: 3
The course forefronts the people aspects of a managerial position in the hospitality industry. It provides an understanding on how to find and hire the right people; then develop, train, supervise and motivate those individuals. The laws governing the hospitality workplace are explained to help protect the business entity from legal disputes while ensuring that employees and customers rights are also protected. The importance of developing employee standards of performance and quality are emphasized along with administering various competitive employee benefit and compensation programs existent in the hospitality industry.

HRM122 - Food Purchasing Credits: 3
Principles involved in preliminary planning, concept development, design and layout for foodservice operations in hotels, chains, restaurants and institutions. Workstation arrangement and equipment.

HRM126 - Quantity Food Preparation Credits: 4
Emphasis placed on food preparation as related to standardized recipes, work methods, pantry production, and the preparation of soups, sauces, gravies, breads, and desserts.
Prerequisite: HRM 101.

HRM130 - Hotel and Restaurant Operations Credits: 3
A study of the hotel and restaurant industry covering such aspects as sales promotions, advertising, legal aspects, insurance, labor-management relations, ethics.

HRM132 - Property Management and Housekeeping Credits: 3
Study of function and principles involved in housekeeping and plant maintenance. Course includes cost of operation, managing maintenance needs, water and waste water systems, energy management, HVAC systems, lighting, etc. the building and exterior facilities, landscape and grounds, parking areas, facility design and renovations.

HRM134 - Management in the Hospitality Industry Credits: 3
Management in the hospitality industry is designed to explain the principles of supervision as they apply specifically to the hospitality industry. The basic principles of management are clearly explained, as well as their practical applications in a day-to-day setting. The course further provides relevant examples of proven ways to get maximum results of hospitality supervision and management through responsible direction and guidance. This course is one of three certification courses designed to provide students desiring to become executive chefs with a basic understanding of supervision with the hospitality industry.

HRM140 - Professional Food Service Credits: 2
This course will consist of lectures, demonstrations and hands-on laboratory work intended to familiarize the students with the multifaceted world of hospitality service, from guest, table service, types of service, banquet and ala carte service to beverage and wine service. Students will also learn the basics of table side food preparation.

HRM211 - Layout of Food Service Equipment Credits: 3
Principles involved in preliminary planning, concept development, design and layout for foodservice operations in hotels, chains, restaurants and institutions. Workstation arrangement and equipment.

HRM212 - Hospitality Law Credits: 3
The fundamental principles of hospitality law with emphasis on the laws of society, contracts, sales, franchise and lease contracts. Emphasis is focused on preventing liability through a proactive understanding and management of the law and the ability to manage correctly thus avoiding costly and protracted litigation.

HRM213 - Beverage Operations Credits: 3
Covers the history of wine and spirits. Focus of fermentation processes, and brand specifications. Lectures also include purchasing, storage, planning and operation of a beverage department, merchandising, mechanical controls and bar design.

HRM215 - Marketing for the Hospitality Industry Credits: 3
Study of the theory and techniques of marketing including research of possible customs and competition. Merchandising, promotional tools and the other forms of advertising are also studied. Sales tools and selling techniques are stressed.

HRM217 - Meat Analysis Credits: 3
Study of standards and quality factors, with training in the grading of meats to the specifications of the U.S.D.A. The study of proper meats and their nutritious uses.

HRM218 - Resort Operations Credits: 3
This course provides a comprehensive understanding of the myriad components of the modern resort. The course differentiates between hotel operations and resort responsibilities and provides an understanding of the systems, programs, and procedures utilized in each entity. Emphasis is focused on operation standards, along with sales and marketing strategies needed for a property to appeal to its various market segments: retail shops, guest activity programming, business, travelers, vacationers, and children.

HRM228 - Managerial Financial Analysis and Planning Credits: 3
Essentials of food and beverage control from both the operational and accountability standpoints, including environment, profit planning and forecasting, budgeting.
Prerequisite: MAT 103.

HRM232 - Meeting and Convention Planning Credits: 3
This course provides a broad overview of the Meeting, Exposition, Events, and Convention (MEEC) industry. It provides for an understanding of the specialty nature of this growth segment of the larger hospitality industry. Knowledge is gained in learning the various positions, departments, and processes in the marketplace as well as an understanding of the needed integration between all th various specialty aspects of planning and/or hosting a MEEC.

HRM260 - Hotel-Restaurant Work Experience Practicum Credits: 0
Five hundred clock hours of practical experience in the hospitality or related industries. A notarized work report is required of each student at the end of each semester and summer term. Cost of notarization will be the responsibility of the student. Please contact the Department Chairperson to obtain proper documentation.

HMS101 - Introduction to Human Services Credits: 3
This is the introductory course in Human Services curriculum. The course provides an overview of many facets involved in the human service profession: the roles and functions of human service workers, the history and major theoretical approaches to the helping services, desirable attitudes and values, skills and knowledge for the human service worker, methods of counseling and intervention, social agency organizations and delivery of services and employment in the human ser­vice field.

HMS102 - Interviewing and Counseling Skills Credits: 3
This course is an exploration of the essential interviewing skills and core facilitative conditions necessary for helping professionals. The primary focus is on the practical application of interviewing, basic counseling and case management skills. Interpersonal communication, interviewing techniques, working with diverse populations, and professional ethics will be explored.

HMS201 - Case Management Credits: 3
This course focuses on the case management process in the helping professions. Students will develop knowledge and skills for successful case management.

HMS204 - Ethics and Cultural Competency for the Helping Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the basic principles of the National Organization of Human Services (NOHS) Code of Ethics and to provide an introduction to multicultural helping. Emphasis is on the continuing development of the professional self, ethical decision making and general cultural competence issues as well as issues specific to becoming ethically and culturally competent in the helping professions.

HMS205 - Social Policy for the Helping Profession Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide students with the ability to analyze contemporary social welfare policy issues and programs to understand the relationship between social policy and the helping professions. The course focuses on the historical, political, economic and other social conditions that influence policy development in the United States. Policy issues and programs are addressed as they affect majority and vulnerable/marginalized groups with a particular emphasis on social and economic justice.
Prerequisites: HMS 101, 102, and 201.

HMS206 - Group Process Credits: 3
This course explores the areas of group work. The course emphasizes both theoretical and practical approaches to counseling with groups.

HMS207 - Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce the student to the field of psychiatric disorders which can occur in children and adolescents. Focus will be on the diagnostic process of assessment, symptoms, and methods used when working with children, adolescents and their families in a child care, psychiatric or other human service setting.

HMS220 - Field Work in Human Services I Credits: 3
This course is designed to give the student practical experience in the area of human services. Through a supervised placement in a human services agency, the student gains an understanding of the work environment, role, and responsibilities of the human services professional during their completion of 140 hours of field work. An integral part of this course is a seminar designed to help students integrate theory and practice. (A minimum grade of 'C' must be attained in all Human Services courses in order to take HMS 220.)
Prerequisites: HMS 101, 102 and 201.

HMS221 - Field Work in Human Services II Credits: 3
This course is designed to give the student a second practical experience in the area of human services. Through another supervised placement in a human services agency, the student gains an understanding of the work environment, role, and responsibilities of the human services professional during their completion of 140 hours of field work. An integral part of this course is a seminar designed to help students integrate theory and practice. (A minimum grade of 'C' must be attained in all Human Services courses in order to take HMS 221.)
Prerequisites: HMS 101, 102, 201 and 220.

HMS222 - Substance Abuse Counseling Credits: 3
This course is an overview of the substance abuse field. The course is presented in two general areas: etiology or theories of addiction, and beginning intervention techniques. Topics and discussion include various models of addiction, methods of assessment and intervention, group counseling, family issues, current research, treatment planning, case management, treatment modalities and dual diagnosis.

INT120 - Materials & Methods for Interior Design Credits: 3
Materials and Methods for Interior Design will involve the exploration of materials, finishes, components, cabinetry, and equipment specific interior design projects. Students will become familiar with the nomenclature, construction and installation methods, and evaluation of different categories of materials and equipment. Competency in specifying appropriate materials and application methods will be developed. Technical details for the installation of finishes, cabinets, and equipment will be studied. The environmental impact and sustainability of materials will be studied. Course format includes readings and lectures as well as other supplemental and experiential learning assignments.

INT135 - Introduction to Interior Design Credits: 3
Introduction to Interior Design orients the student to activities and responsibilities of an interior design professional. The fundamental exploration of the principles, elements, and processes of interior design will involve furniture coordination and arrangement, and the application of color, and manipulation of light for a given space. Critical thinking competencies related to design, history, and process will be expressed through the verbal and graphic communication of synthesized ideas and design intent in a formal presentation to peers and invited professionals. Projects will be both collaborative and individual including class participation in the development of a service learning or experiential learning project.
Prerequisite: ARC 110.

INT225 - InteriorDesign Studio I Credits: 3
Interior Design Studio I allows the student to further develop an understanding of the philosophy and concepts of design including application of the fundamental principles and elements. In-depth exploration into the purpose and function of interior spaces with a strong emphasis on planning for universal accessibility. Students will acquire basic skill in applying all aspects of space planning and interior design including assessment, measurement, product selection, color, design elements, design concepts, and both verbal and graphic communication. Design proposals including traditional orthographic drawings, perspective drawings, color/material boards, models, and computer generated renderings and models will be presented for review and critique by peers, instructors, and industry professionals. Course format will include readings and lectures, studio assignments, and comprehensive projects as well as other supplemental and experiential learning assignments. Students are expected to have fundamental drafting, presentation, and model building skills prior to enrolling in the course.
Prerequisites: ARC 175, INT 120, INT 135, ARC 192.

INT230 - Interior Design Studio II Credits: 3
Interior Design Studio II continues the competencies developed in INT-230 with special emphasis on space programming, safety, and the integration of mechanical equipment. This course includes a capstone project which applies program wide competencies to a comprehensive design proposal for an actual client. Projects and assignments incorporating the philosophy of design including color theory, architectural styles and application of the principles and elements of design as applied to interiors will be explored at a more sophisticated level with an emphasis on commercial interiors. Students will document and convey all aspects of the design process including assessment, measurement, product selection, color, design elements, design concepts, and both verbal and graphic communication. Design proposals including technical plans will be completed following industry and regulatory standards. Course format will include readings, lectures, and practical studio assignments, as well as other supplemental and experiential learning assignments.
Prerequisite: INT 225.

INT290 - Interior Design Practicum Credits: 0
As part of the Interior Design program students are required to participate in an industry based experiental learning activity. The practicum consists of 120 hours of work in a professional setting. Students will gain exposure to the professional practiceof interior design. In addition to documented attendance and active participation at the work site, students are required to complete periodic reports and compile a portfolio of work to document employment activities.

JOR100 - Introduction to Mass Communications Credits: 3
A survey of the influence of mass media on culture society and the individual.

JOR101 - Introduction to Journalism and News Reporting Credits: 4
A beginner's course in gathering and writing news. Topics include: definition of news, writing leads and building a story, the law of libel, and news sources. The focus of the course is writing in a terse, accurate Associated Press style.

JOR102 - Advanced News Reporting Credits: 4
A course in advanced news writing designed as a follow-up to those who have had Journalism 101 (Intro. to Journalism and News Reporting) or its equivalent. Topics include: specialized reporting, on-line journalism, human interest stories, news features, and introductory copyreading. There is constant practice in writing in-depth news assignments.
Prerequisite: JOR 101.

JOR103 - Feature Writing Credits: 4
A course designed for the advanced journalism student. Students will be assigned specific feature-type assignments and will be required to use a more creative approach than is customary in straight news writing. Students also will be required to determine what type of photographic effort should be included to strengthen the finished presentation.
Prerequisites: JOR 101, JOR 102 or permission of department chair.

JOR200 - Professional Internship Credits: 4
A supervised observation-experience program of study and assignment to a professional newspaper, a professional public relations office, or a work site that offers the student an opportunity to employ skills learned in the JOR program. Students will work 200 hours with their employers and expect to spend one hour each week in conference with the journalism instructor and others in the internship program.
Prerequisites: JOR 101, 102, 103 (minimum 2.0 GPA in each course) or permission of department chair.

JOR201 - Copy Editing and Make-up Credits: 3
Evaluating news and display: editing and rewriting news for the mass media, (with emphasis on the daily newspaper), newspaper typography, make-up and news judgment and selection; using appropriate software programs to create newspaper pages.
Prerequisite: JOR 101.

JOR202 - Advertising Credits: 3
A study of basic principles of advertising. Elements of advertising; survey of different departments of advertising work, including copy, art, display, trademarks, media, and knowledge of graphics and layout. Analysis of current advertisements. Advertising as a social force. Creating ads using the latest computer software.

JOR209 - Special Projects Workshop Credits: 4
A supervised program of study and assignment designed to culuminate a student's coursework by employing writing, editing, design, and marketing skills learned in the JOR program in the development of a professional publication (newspaper, Web publication or magazine). The workshop requires that the student display a high level of skills mastery in the area of concentration of the selected topic. Each student is required to provide 200 hours of work, which includes preparation, production, and meetings.
Prerequisites: JOR 101, 102, 103 (Grade C or better in each course) and permission of the department chair.

JOR211 - Introduction to Public Relations Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals and basic communication principles and instruments involved in the profession of public relations. Since public relations professionals are presumed to be effective writers, speakers, organizers and listeners, stress is placed on writing and interviewing. There is also an emphasis on gathering and analyzing information, particularly in the realm of publics and public opinion, and in utilizing research in formulating strategies and preparing presentations. Consideration is given to the history of public relations as well as to the role of public relations in the future, to media law and ethics, and to problem-solving and crisis management. Tactics, techniques and critical skills are learned through analysis of actual public relations case studies, and through the hands-on experience of preparing public relations strategies and campaigns.

LAP100 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies Credits: 3
This course is designed to present the basic knowledge needed to perform the work of a paralegal. An overview of the paralegal profession is presented with a basic legal vocabulary utilized. The basic skills of fact investigation, legal research and analysis combined with legal ethics are examined in detail.

LAP201 - Tort and Criminal Law Credits: 3
A basic knowledge of the law of torts with related skills required to be an effective paralegal assistant in the practice will be the main theme of the course. Criminal law is also considered by a survey of the nature, purposes and doctrine of modern law. (Paralegals only)
Prerequisites: BUS-261, LAP-100

LAP202 - Estate Law Credits: 3
The various duties of lawyers and their representatives of an estate will be considered in detail. The analysis of the administration of an estate will include the Pennsylvania Probate practice including grants of letters, probate of will, duties following grants of letters, family exemptions, election against the will, and the administration of real estate.
Prerequisites: BUS-261, LAP-100

LAP203 - Corporate Law Credits: 3
The incorporation process undertaken by lawyers and legal assistants including the laws of incorporation, the qualifications of foreign jurisdictions, amendments to by-laws, close corporations, shareholders meetings, employment agreements and corporate distributions are examined in detail.
Prerequisites: BUS-261, LAP-100

LAP204 - Bankruptcy Law Credits: 3
The background and objectives of current bankruptcy law with an understanding of the Bankruptcy Code will be considered. The Code and Rules are analyzed with emphasis on the practical aspects of filing and handling a bankruptcy case.
Prerequisites: BUS-261, LAP-100

LAP205 - Family Law Credits: 3
The course provides an overview of the various objectives, classes and sources of family law. In addition, the course analyzes family law including areas of antenuptial agreements, contract cohabitation, common law marriages, annulment, and divorce procedure.
Prerequisites: BUS-261, LAP-100

LAP206 - Civil Litigation for the Paralegal Credits: 3
This course is designed to provide an overview of the court system and litigation process. The concepts of jurisdiction and venue are reviewed in detail. The chronological plan of litigation, concentrating on the importance of the opening stages of a lawsuit, interviewing skills, drafting and filing pleadings, and the appropriate avenues of discovery are examined minutely. The final stages of litigation and post-trial proceedings are covered, with suggestions to the students in the form of practical illustrations.
Prerequisites: BUS-261, LAP-100

LAP250 - Legal Research & Writing Credits: 3
This capstone hands-on course provides practice in conducting legal research and writing legal documents building on knowledge gained in the LAP program.
Prerequisites: 12 credits of LAP with C or higher

LAP279 - Legal Assisting Internship Credits: 3
Student is given the opportunity to do an internship in the legal profession. Internships may be done in any legal environment with the approval of the business department. This internship is intended to give the student practical work experience in the private and public law sectors in doing the work required of a paralegal. The student will be supervised by the coordinator of the internship.
Prerequisite: 18 credits of LAP with a minimum GPA of 2.0.

COS230 - Elementary Data Structures Credits: 3
An introductory course in data structures. Topics covered include design and analysis of algorithms, arrays, pointers, strings, stacks, queues, lists, trees, sorting and searching. The encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism characteristics of Object-Oriented Programming are studied. Programming projects in the C++ language are integrated into course material. (Lab fee will be charged.)
Prerequisite: CIS 158 (Grade of C or better)

MAT040 - Pre-Technical Mathematics Credits: 3
Intended for students enrolled in engineering technology programs. Designed to provide the basic technical mathematics skills in preparation for MAT 111. Topics of algebra and trigonometry including roots, exponents, graphic and analytic solutions of linear equations, quadratic equations, with emphasis on application of principles as an engineering tool in problem-solving situations. This course does not apply toward graduation.

MAT050 - Fundamentals of Arithmetic Credits: 3
Designed to provide the student with basic computational skills; specifically addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division of whole numbers, fractions, and decimals. Additional course content includes a review of ratio and proportion, percents, English and Metric Systems of Measurement, and basic geometric concepts. A diagnostic test is administered at the beginning of the course to determine level of competency and at the end of the course to measure growth. Course materials may be programmed. This course does not apply toward graduation.

MAT060 - Fundamentals of Algebra Credits: 3
Designed to give the student mastery of specific skills in mathematics in preparation for MAT 105. Diagnostic testing is accomplished at the beginning of the course to determine level of competency and at the end of the course to measure growth. Course materials may be programmed. The student will review elementary algebra, including instruction in the real number system, polynomials, linear and quadratic equations, linear inequalities, and verbal problems (for application). This course does not apply toward graduation.
Prerequisite: Placement by exam or MAT 050 (Grade of C or better).

MAT101 - Survey of Mathematics Credits: 3
Intended to meet minimum college requirements in mathematics. Explores the role of mathematics in modern culture emphasizing techniques and applications in the social, natural, and management sciences, as well as those in technological fields. Topics studied include: number theory, set theory, logic, consumer math, geometry, graph theory, probability and statistics.
Prerequisites: Placement by exam or MAT 050 (Grade of C or better).

MAT102 - Elementary and Intermediate Algebra Credits: 4
This is an accelerated course which combines the goals of MAT 060 and 105. The student will review elementary algebra, including instruction in polynomials, linear and quadratic equations, linear inequalities and application problems. Additional topics include functions and their graphs, system of equations and rational functions. This course prepares the student for college algebra and/or basic statistics. A graphing calculator is recommended.

MAT103 - Applied Mathematics for Industry Credits: 3
Designed to help meet the mathematical needs of students enrolled in the industrial-mechanical technology or technical certification programs. Content includes fractions, decimals, percent, approximate numbers, conversion of linear units of measure, scientific notation, basic algebra, basic trigonometry of right triangle, ratios, powers and roots, and use of mathematical tables. Topics introduced and developed with emphasis on industrial application.

MAT104 - Mathematics for the Hospitality Industry Credits: 3
Designed to help meet the mathematical needs of students enrolled in Hospitality related programs. Content includes fractions, decimals, percents, approximate numbers, conversion of units of measure, basic algebra, ratios, the use of mathematical tables and hospitality production formulas. Topics introduced and developed with emphasis on hospitality application.

MAT105 - Intermediate Algebra Credits: 3
A mid-level algebra course which builds on the concepts of elementary algebra and prepares the student for College Algebra and/or Basic Statistics. Topics studied include: functions and their graphs, systems of equations, linear, quadratic and rational functions, and applications. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisite: Placement by exam or MAT 060 (Grade of C or better).

MAT106 - Survey of Statistical Mathematics Credits: 3
Intended to prepare students for an introductory course in statistics, and also meet minimum college requirements in mathematics. The student will review important concepts of set theory, algebra, graphing and probability that apply to statistics. The course will also introduce basic statistical concepts and a graphing calculator is recommended.
Prerequisites: MAT-060

MAT107 - Basic Statistics Credits: 3
An introductory course in statistics beginning with descriptive statistics, probability, inferential statistics and decision-making. Binomial distributions, normal distributions, linear regression and correlation are applied to management, natural, and social sciences. A graphing caluculator is required.
Prerequisites: MAT 102, MAT 105 or MAT 106 or placement by exam. (Grade of C or better)

MAT109 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I Credits: 3
Explore sets, numeration systems, relations, functions, number theory, fractions, decimals, ratio, proportion and percent using a variety of problem-solving strategies.
Prerequisite: MAT 050 (Grade of C or better) or placement by exam

MAT110 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II Credits: 3
An introduction to algebra, probability and statistics, and geometry using a variety of problem-solving strategies.
Prerequisite: MAT 109 or placement by exam (Grade of C or better)

MAT111 - Technical Mathematics I Credits: 5
Mathematics for technology. Topics include algebraic operations, exponents, radicals, rectangular coordinates, function graphs, system of equations, determinants, quadratic equation, trigonometry, polar coordinates, complex numbers, logarithms and the use of a scientific graphing calculator in solving applied technology problems.
Prerequisite: One year of secondary school algebra, or equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

MAT112 - Technical Mathematics II Credits: 5
Analysis of the geometry of lines and curves; interpretation of limits of a function; differentiation and integration as applied to graphs of functions and problems in technology.
Prerequisite: MAT 111.

MAT121 - College Algebra Credits: 3
An advanced course in Algebra. The course is designed as one of the
Prerequisites that prepares the student for Calculus. Topics studied include: linear, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs, equation solving and systems of equations. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisite: Placement by exam or MAT 105.

MAT125 - Pre-Calculus Credits: 5
A course in advanced algebra and trigonometry designed to prepare students for calculus. Topics include functions, inverse functions, logarithms, exponentials, and trigonometry. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisite: Placement by exam or MAT 105 (Grade of C or better).

MAT140 - Calculus for Business Credits: 3
The study of applied business calculus will provide business professionals the tools for understanding the changes that occur in the business disciplines. The topics studied include: limits, differentiation, application of derivatives, integration, anti-differentiation and its application. All topics will include the study of transcendental function. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisites: MAT-121 (Grade of C or better).

MAT151 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus I Credits: 4
A first level College Calculus course. Topics studied include: limits, continuity, differentiation, and applications of the derivative. The course concludes with an introduction to anti-differentiation. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisites: MAT 121 and MAT 122 or MAT 125. (Grade of C or better).

MAT240 - Intro to Abstract Mathematics Credits: 3
A course meant to serve as a bridge between computationally oriented mathematics and conceptually oriented mathematics, with emphasis placed upon understanding and constructing proofs. Topics include: symbolic logic, truth tables, logical equivalence, logical quantifiers, direct proof, proof by contrapositive, proof by contradiction, proof by cases, existence proof, mathematical induction, sets, set operations, indexed families of sets, Cartesian products, relations, functions, operations with functions, cardinality of sets.
Prerequisites: MAT 121

MAT251 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus II Credits: 4
A continuation of the topics from Calculus I including integration, and applications of integration and differentiation. Exponential, logarithmic and hyperbolic functions are studied. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisite: MAT 151. (Grade of C or better).

MAT252 - Analytic Geometry and Calculus III Credits: 4
A continuation of Calculus I and II. Topics studied include: infinite sequences and series, vectors, functions of several variables, partial derivatives and multiple integration. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisite: MAT 251. (Grade of C or better).

MAT260 - Discrete Mathematics Credits: 3
This course is intended to be an introduction to pure or abstract mathematics, especially as it applies to Computer Science. It is recommended for those majoring in Mathematics as an introduction to proof, analysis of algorithms, and the underlying logical structure of mathematics. It is a required course in the Computer Science curriculum and is recommended for all students interested in software and/ or computer engineering. Topics studied include logic, proofs, sets, relations, functions, algorithms, counting methods, probability, graph theory and trees.
Prerequisite: MAT 121. (Grade of C or better).

MAT275 - Linear Algebra Credits: 3
A modern course in abstract algebra that gives the student opportunities to make indepth investigations in an advanced area of mathematics with widespread practical applications, but still allows work with abstract concepts. Topics studied include: linear systems and transformations, matrix theory and determinants, vector spaces, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, inner products, and their applications. A graphing calculator is required.
Prerequisite: MAT 251. (Grade of C or better).

MAT279 - Differential Equations Credits: 3
Differential equations of the First and Second order; hyperbolic functions; elliptical integrals; Gamma and Bessel functions; Laplace transformations; higher order equations. Prerequisite: MAT 252 (Grade of C or better).

MAT280 - Ordinary & Partial Differential Equations Credits: 4
Differential equations of the First and Second order; hyperbolic functions; elliptical integrals; Gamma and Bessel functions; Laplace transformations; higher order equations; Fourier Series and Second-order partial differential equations
Prerequisite: MAT 252 (Grade of C or better).

MAT299 - Special Topics Credits: 1
The Special Topics (MAT 299) course is intended to build on knowledge and skills developed in a college-level math course. Students will study a topic, to be chosen by the instructor, at an in-depth level in a specific area. Students may repeat this course with a new topic.
Co-requisite: Approved MAT Course

MRT110 - Basic Music Recording Credits: 5
An overview of the tools, theories and techniques employed in the music recording industry.

MRT120 - Live Sound Reinforcement Credits: 3
This course introduces the concepts and technical skills required for live event sound reinforcement. Topics include the operation and interconnection of components of a basic sound system including consoles, amplifiers, speaker stacks and processors. Student will also learn to differentiate between a recording, front-of­house and monitor mix.

MRT121 - Basic MIDI Theory and Sequencing Credits: 4
This course is designed to afford the student the opportunity to utilize the latest digital technology by working with a Musical Instrument Digital Interface. This industry-standard interface is used with electronic musical keyboards and PCs for computer control of musical instruments and devices. Through the use of hardware and software, the student will be able to create realistic-sounding music by synthesizing individual and multiple instruments into a musical sample or composition.

MRT122 - On-Location Recording Credits: 3
This course will provide the student with a working knowledge of the special techniques required to record music outside of a studio setting. It covers the unique requirements for capturing sound in diverse acoustical environments where music is performed. From the concert hall, to a jazz combo in an auditorium, to a rock band in a club, the course concentrates on capturing live performances for broadcast or later distribution on CD.

MRT220 - Advanced Music Recording Credits: 3
An advanced course that affords the student the opportunity to build upon the technical skills developed in MRT 110 (Basic Music Recording). A more detailed approach to equipment capabilities, multi-track recording skills and mastery of contemporary recording tools will be emphasized. Signal processing, analog and digital recording, editing and advanced mixing are examined in depth.
Prerequisite: MRT 110.

MRT221 - Music Management Credits: 3
An examination of the current requirements and business trends used both to record music and market product in the industry. The perspective of the artist , as well as the needs of the recording industry will be examined. Through lecture and research, students will examine cost ratio, market analysis, job responsibilities, and employment opportunities as producer, engineer and artist.

MRT222 - Digital Audio Editing Credits: 4
This course introduces the basic concepts of the digital audio workstation and the processes involved in performing multi-track recording, editing and sound processing utilizing a hard disc recording system. Digital audio mastering and Compact Disc and Audio DVD replication are also discussed.

MRT228 - Music Recording Workshop Credits: 6
Music Recording Workshop consists of 6 credit hours of intensive work in a fully functional studio setting. This atmosphere will afford the student the opportunity to put their newly formed skills to the test by working with musicians in an actual recording session. A final presentation, based on a semester project will be required to demonstrate the student's development and expertise.
Prerequisite: MRT 110.

MRT229 - Music Recording Internship Credits: 6
A six-credit course in which the student will participate in a supervised on-the-job observation and work experience in a local recording facility or industry related core competency. Eligibility will be based on the student's departmental grade point average. Assignment will be made following the evaluation of the student's grades, prior experience, and career objectives. Students will meet periodically with faculty members, will keep a running anecdotal history of his/her experience, along with a term paper placing those experiences in perspective.

NMT211 - Safety and Equipment Overview for Nanofabrication Credits: 3
This course will provide an overview of basic semiconductor industry processing equipment and materials handling procedures with a focus on maintenance, safety, environment, and health issues. Topics to be covered will include: cleanroom maintenance, safety, and health issues, vacuum pumping maintenance, environmental, safety, and health issues (covering direct drive mechanical, Rootes blowers, turbomolcular, and dry mechanical systems); furnace maintenance, safety, environmental, and health issues (covering horizontal, vertical, rapid thermal annealing tools); chemical vapor deposition system maintenance, safety, environmental, and health issues (covering gas delivery, corrosive and flammable gas storage and plumbing, regulators, and mass flow controllers); and vacuum deposition/ etching system maintenance, safety, environment, and health issues (covering microwave and RF power supplies and tuners, heating and cooling units, vacuum gauges, valves, and, process controllers). Specific materials handling issues will include DI water, solvents, cleansers, ion implantation and diffusion sources, pho­toresists and developers, metals, dielectrics, toxic, flammable, corrosive, and highpurity gases, and packaging materials.
Prerequisites: CHE 151, GET 251 or GET 252.

NMT212 - Basic Nanofabrication Processes Credits: 3
This course will cover in detail the thermal processing necessary for semicon­ductor fabrication. Growth and annealing processes, which utilize horizontal and vertical furnaces, will be examined as well as rapid thermal annealing. This course will cover single crystal growth (Czochralski, float-zone) as well as wafer slicing, etching, polishing, epitaxial growth, and substrate (bulk or epi) specifications. The course will address the impact of thermal processing and thermal processing history on defects, gettering, impurities and overall device properties. The student will grow and measure gate and field oxides, implant and activate source anti­drain regions, and evaluate thermal budget requirements using state-of-the-art tools.
Prerequisites: CHE 151, GET 252.

NMT213 - Thin Films in Nanofabrication Credits: 3
The basics of thin films including growth, structure, mechanical properties, electrical properties, deposition equipment will be examined in the first part of this course. This will include atmospheric, low pressure, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering, thermal evaporation, and beam evaporation physical vapor deposition. Materials to be considered will include dielectrics (nitride, oxide), polysilicon (doped and undoped), and metals (aluminum, tungsten, copper, adhesion promoters, diffusion barriers) The second part of the course will focus on etching processes and will emphasize reactive ion etching (single water, batch), high-ion-density reactors (TCP, helicon, ECR, MERIE) and ion beam etching. Student will receive hands-on experience in depositing and etching dielectric, semiconductor, and metal materials using state-of-the-art tools.
Prerequisites: CHE 151, GET 252.

NMT214 - Lithography for Nanofabrication Credits: 3
This course will cover all aspects of lithography from design and mask fabrication to pattern transfer and inspection. The course is divided into three major sections. The first section describes the lithographic process from substrate preparation to exposure. Most of the emphasis will be on understanding the nature and behavior of photoresist materials. The second section examines the process from development through inspection (both before and after pattern transfer). This section will introduce optical masks, aligners, steppers and scanners. In addition, CD control and profile control of photoresists will be investigated. The last section will discuss advanced lithographic techniques such as e-beam, X-ray, EUV, and ion beam lithography.
Prerequisites: CHE 151, GET 252.

NMT215 - Materials Modification in Nanofabrication Credits: 3
In this course the student will learn about the manufacturing issues involved in metal interconnects, dielectrics and final device assembly. Aluminum, refractory metals and copper deposition techniques and characterization will be discussed in detail along with topics such as diffusion barriers, contact resistance, electromigration, corrosion, and adhesion. The importance of planarization techniques such as deposition/etchback and chemical/mechanical polishing will be emphasized. Lastly, packaging procedures such as die separation, inspection bonding, sealing and final test will be examined.
Prerequisites: CHE 151, GET 252.

NMT216 - Characterization, Packaging and Testing of Nanofabricated Structures Credits: 3
This course examines a variety of measurements and techniques essential for device fabrication. Monitoring techniques such as residual gas analysis (RGA), optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and end point detection will be discussed. Characterization techniques such as SEM, XPS/Auger, surface profilometry, advanced optical microscopy, optical thin film measurements, ellipsometry, and re­sistivity/conductivity measurements will be used on real samples. Basic electrical measurements on device structures for yield analysis and process control will also be stressed. These will include breakdown measurements, junction testing, and C-V and I-V tests.
Prerequisites: CHE 151, GET 252.

NET101 - Introduction to Reactor Plant Systems Credits: 3
Basic design and operation of commercial nuclear power plants. Boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor component design and interaction are explored.
Corequisites: MAT III, EET 131.

NET104 - Nuclear Instrumentation & Controls Credits: 3
Measurement theory and principles of operation of the following process variables: pressure, flow, liquid level, and temperature.
Prerequisites: EET 131.

NET202 - Principles of Electronic Instrumentation Credits: 3
Theory and principles of electronic circuits and test equipment are studied as found in instrumentation and controls.
Prerequisites: EET 131, 132.

NET203 - Atomic & Nuclear Physics Credits: 3
A study and analysis of the constitution of nuclei, isotopes, radioactivity, and nuclear reactions. The application of nuclear physics to the operation and control of a nuclear reactor is emphasized. Includes introduction to theory of relativity and quantum physics.

NET205 - Fundamentals of Health Physics Credits: 3
Physics of radiation, biological effects, radiation safety, ALARA techniques, radiation theory, safety regulations, and techniques of operation of Health Physics Survey instruments for measuring radiation, contamination, and airborne activity.
Prerequisites: NET 203, PHY 124.

NET206 - Reactor Core Fundamentals Credits: 3
A study of basic concepts and applications of nuclear engineering, reactivity control, core design applications, and reactivity management in a commercial nuclear power plant.
Prerequisites: NET 203.

NET208 - Human Performance Technology/Error Avoidance Credits: 2
This course describes types of errors, error likely situations, and techniques to avoid errors. It includes both theoretical and practical applications of human performance technology. Students will master the performance of basic error reduction techniques.

NUR100 - Introduction to the Nursing Credits: 1
This course introduces the incoming student to the Luzerne County Community College Nursing Program and the role of the professional nurse. The program of study and its progression throughout all nursing courses is introduced with emphasis on the concept-based curriculum and use of an active learning approach to facilitate critical thinking, clinical judgment and decision-making, and evidence-based practice.

NUR110 - Nursing Concepts I Credits: 9
Concepts within the three domains of the Individual, Healthcare System, and Nursing are introduced. Concepts are presented using specific content exemplars selected by the faculty based on prevalence, incidence and significance of the issues/problems. Students will learn to use the nursing process to meet the needs of patients with actual or potential health problems. Theory is applied to clinical practice in long-term care and acute-care settings with emphasis on nursing skills. Basic evidence-based nursing skills and technical skills are introduced in the Campus Laboratory.
Prerequisites: NUR 100 with a grade of C or better.

NUR115 - Transition into Nursing Concept Curriculum Credits: 2
This course prepares the Advance Placement student for transitioning into the LCCC Concept Curriculum. Concepts within the three domains of the Individual, Healthcare System, and Nursing are introduced. Concepts are presented using speci c content exemplars selected by the faculty based on prevalence, incidence in addition, signi cance of the issues/prob- lems. Students will learn to use the nurs- ing process to meet the needs of patients with actual or potential health problems. Theory is applied to clinical practice in a simulated experience with emphasis on nursing skills. Basic evidence-based nursing skills and technical skills are introduced in the Campus Lab. Required NUR 110 skill performance activities are also reviewed, demonstrated and tested.
Prerequisite: Advanced Placement Test.

NUR120 - Nursing Concepts II Credits: 9
Additional concepts within the three domains of the Individual, Healthcare System, and Nursing are introduced or expanded upon. Concepts are presented using specific content exemplars selected by the faculty based on prevalence, incidence, and significance across the lifespan. Students continue to utilize the nursing process to meet the needs of patients in various healthcare and community settings. Theory is applied in acute care facilities and outpatient settings with emphasis on clinical skills related to developmental stages and health promotion across the lifespan. Evidence-based nursing skills and technical skills continue to be introduced in the Campus Laboratory.
Prerequisites: NUR 110 and BIO 135 with a grade of C or better, PSY 103, SPE 210.

NUR220 - Pharmacology/Pathophysiology for Health Care Professionals Credits: 3
The course is designed to increase knowledge of specific drug classifications. An overview of physiological dysfunction is presented as a foundation for drug administration. Content focuses on expected and unexpected physiological responses of the human body to drugs within selected classifications. A background in anatomy and physiology or chemistry might be helpful to the student, however, not required.

NUR221 - Physical Assessment Credits: 3
The student builds upon existing interview and assessment skills and learns the technique of eliciting a complete health history and physical examination of the adult/pediatric patient. Faculty use a variety of learning experiences including didactic presentation, audio-visual aids, models and clinical laboratory simulations to develop requisite skill sets.

NUR226 - Perioperative Nursing Didactic Credits: 3
The course is designed to introduce the perioperative role of the Registered Nurse in the operating room with emphasis on the intra-operative phase. Responsibilities of the scrub and circulating nurse; basic principles of asepsis; ethical-legal aspects; and the preparation, care, and application of surgical supplies and equipment will be presented. Clinical content is taught in an operating room setting using simulated situations.
Prerequisites: GPA of 3.0 or greater; NUR 110, NUR 120.

NUR227 - Perioperative Nursing Internship Credits: 3
The course is designed to prepare the Registered Nurse, senior student nurse or a graduate nurse with entry level skills for work in the operating room. Emphasis includes application of theoretical principles, knowledge and skills learned in a perioperative clinical setting.
Prerequisite: NUR 226.

NUR228 - Registered Nurse First Assistant Credits: 3
The course is designed to prepare the Registered Nurse, senior student nurse or a graduate nurse with entry level skills to work as a Registered Nurse First Assistant (RNFA). Content emphasizes the skills and didactic knowledge required for the role of RFNA in the Operating Room. Qualifications of the RNFA as well as historical origins of first assisting are proposed.

NUR229 - Registered Nurse First Assistant Clinical Internship Credits: 4
A self-directed, 120-hour clinical experience clinical course to be completed within a four-month period at the student?s discretion. A learning contract is devised by student and faculty mentor whereby clinical objectives and experience are monitored.
Prerequisite: NUR 228.

NUR230 - Nursing Concepts III Credits: 9
This course further develops concepts within the three domains of the Individual, Healthcare System, and Nursing. Concepts related to mental/behavioral health as well as increasingly complex physical health problems are introduced in this module. Students focus on the nurse?s role and utilize the nursing process to meet the needs of patients with actual or potential health problems. Theory is applied to clinical practice in acute-care, mental/behavioral health unit, and community-based settings. Campus laboratory experiences provide a variety of simulation exercises to enhance classroom and clinical learning.
Prerequisites: NUR 120 and BIO 136 with a grade of C or better, ENG 101, PSY 217.

NUR240 - Nursing Concepts IV Credits: 9
Concepts within the three domains of the Individual, Healthcare System, and Nursing are further developed and analyzed. Concepts are presented using specific content exemplars selected by the faculty based on prevalence, incidence and significance of the issues/problems. Students focus on complex health problems and use of the nursing process to meet the needs of critically ill patients. Theory is applied to clinical practice in acute-care, critical care, and community-based settings. Critical thinking/clinical decision-making skills and delegation/management principles are emphasized and reinforced through campus laboratory activities.
Prerequisites: NUR 230 with a grade of C or better, NUR 220, BIO 251, SOC 215.
Co-requisite: NUR 250.

NUR250 - Contemporary Concepts in Nursing Credits: 1
This course further prepares the nursing student for a role as a graduate nurse. Students will examine selected contemporary issues impacting nursing practice and the healthcare system. A student-directed/faculty facilitated seminar format will be utilized to discuss and explore current topics affecting the healthcare system.

OMT119 - Keyboarding Credits: 1
Proper keyboarding technique reduces fatigue and increases productivity. This course is a pre-requisite tool to computing providing instruction in developing basic keyboarding skills-keying alphabetic, numeric, and special symbols keys. Emphasis will be placed on technique, speed and accuracy. Students will have a goal of 28 words per minute with two errors on a two-minute timing. Students will also be graded on proper posture and technique.

OMT126 - Keyboarding and Formatting Credits: 3
The course is designed to enhance a student's keyboarding speed and accuracy and to study formatting of business documents. Students using proper technique will review numbers and symbols, and increase keying speed toward a goal of 45 words per minute (WPM). Common business documents such as letters, memos, envelopes, labels, reports, and tables will be created.
Prerequisite: Placement by exam or OMT 119

OMT154 - Administrative Professional I - Procedures and Theory Credits: 3
This course prepares students for their role in the modern office. Students are made aware of daily office procedures such as planning meetings and conferences, techniques on the telephone, and maintaining mail and records. Students will de­velop written and oral communications skills for interacting with coworkers and clients. Finally students will review how the office has changed because of techno­logical advances. (Fall only)
Corequisite: CIS 110.

OMT254 - Administrative Professional II - Executive Office Projects Credits: 3
Students will apply the techniques studied in Administrative Professional I to a simulated office. During the simulation, decision-making skills in regard to office policies and situations will be developed. Methods for attaining an entry-level position and advancing in that position will be explor ed. Also, students may explore office settings through research and interviews with office professionals.
Prerequisites: OMT 154, CIS 111, CIS 112.
Corequisite: CIS 114.

OMT299 - Office Internship Credits: 3
A student who has the recommendation of the office technology faculty member is given guidance in finding an administrative position in the business community. This internship is intended to give the student practical work experience in an office setting. As needed, the instructor will meet periodically with students and immediate supervisors to discuss progress during the internship.
Prerequisites: OMT 126, OMT 154, CIS 111, and CIS 112

PAR100 - The Paraeducator Credits: 1
This course surveys the current issues,trends and legislation pertaining to becoming a paraeducator. Students gain fundamental knowledge of roles, responsibilities and unique issues surrounding becoming aparaeducator with an emphasis on communication and collaboration with stakeholders. Successful completion of this course allows students to complete several ofthe Credential of Competency for SpecialEducators in Pennsylvania per 22 PA Code Chapter 14.105(a)(1)(iii).
Corequisites: ECE ECR, ECE 100.

PAR219 - Observation for Remediation and Assessment in Literacy and Mathematics Credits: 3
This course provides opportunity for students to examine and practice remedial instruction and assessment techniques with special emphasis on literacy and mathematics from grades pre-K through 12. Weekly seminars focus on the theoretical basis of assessment and remedial instruction. Pre-student teaching (PDE Field Experience Stage 3) experience in a school setting for a total of 140 hours is an integral part of the course. Successful completion of this course will allow students to complete several of the Credential of Competency for Special Educators in Pennsylvania per 22 PA Code Chapter 14.105(a)(1)(iii). Prerequisites: ECE ECR, ECE 100, ECE 210, and PAR 100 (Grade of C or better).

PAR221 - Observation for Remediation and Assessment in Literacy andMathematics Credits: 3
This course provides opportunity for students to examine and practice remedial instruction and assessment techniques with special emphasis on literacy and mathematics from grades pre-K through 12. Weekly seminars focus on the theoretical basis of assessment and remedial instruction. Pre-student teaching (PDE Field Experience Stage 3) experience in a school setting for a total of 140 hours is an integral part of the course. Successful completion of this course will allow students to complete several of the Credential of Competency for Special Educators in Pennsylvania per 22 PA Code Chapter 14.105(a)(1)(iii).
Prerequisites: ECE ECR, ECE 100, ECE 210, and PAR 100.

PAS100 - Fundamentals of Baking and Pastry Credits: 2
This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of baking and pastry. Emphasis will be place on: baking/pastry terminology and history, the effects of heat on food, mixing and baking methods, equipment identification/operation, ingredient identification, scaling of ingredients, recipe comprehension and conversion.

PAS101 - Introduction to Pastry Arts/Breads Credits: 4
This course is designed with lecture-theory, demonstration and hands on practical experience in mind. This course will help the student understand the principles of baking, the baking process, and the production and marketing of such products. The students will also be instructed in safe operations of machines, ovens and other bakery equipment. We also will be using basic computer skills to access information, communicate with class and to create baking presentations.
Corequisites: PAS-100

PAS102 - The Art of Pastry Credits: 4
The focus of this course will be on the basics and principles of pastry and the varieties that can be produced when the methodologies are understood. The lecture-demonstration method will emphasize the theory, and history of pastry, as well as a demonstration of each pastry. Demonstrations will include mixing methods, shaping, handling, glazing, cooling and storing of pastries covered. Safe operation of machines, ovens, and other equipment will be explained and followed. At the end of each class the products will be evaluated for flavor, appearance and mouth feel.
Prerequisites: PAS-100

PAS103 - Basic Cakes and Cake Decoration Credits: 4
The focus of this course will be on the basics of cake production, cake assembly, and cake decoration. The hands-on approach will emphasize the theory, ingredients, and methodologies of cake baking and decorating. Demonstrations will include mixing methods, baking, assembly, and icing. Safe operation of machines, ovens, knives, and other equipment will be explained and followed. At the end of each class the products will be evaluated for taste and appearance.
Corequisites: PAS-100

PAS104 - Plated Desserts, Creams, Puddings, Dessert Sauces Credits: 3
This course will be centered around center of the plate items for plated desserts for today?s food service industry. The hands-on demonstration method will emphasize the contemporary techniques and plated design of today?s dessert presentations. Students will work with basic components of the bakeshop and with techniques and artistry to make them into true pictures of dessert. Emphasis will be placed on basic creams, purees, chocolates, and their uses for artistry in design. Safe operation of machines, ovens, and bakery equipment will be explained and followed as well as the basic principles of sanitation and safety. At the end of each class the products will be evaluated for flavor, texture and artistic design.
Prerequisites: PAS-100

PAS105 - Tortes and Specialty Cakes Credits: 4
This class will be focused on cakes, tortes, and specialized cake decoration. This exciting, hands-on approach will emphasize the theory, ingredients, and methodologies of cake baking and the art of torte and cake design. Demonstrations will include scaling, mixing, baking and decorating at all levels. Students will work independently and in groups to produce simple tortes to elegant wedding and tiered cakes. Safe operation of ovens, knives, and other bakery equipment will be explained and employed. At the end of each class the products will be evaluated on taste and appearance.
Prerequisites: PAS-100

PAS106 - Chocolates and Decorative Baking Credits: 3
This course will provide lectures and demonstrations intended to familiarize the students with the basics of chocolate, chocolate molding, and basic candy making. Students will learn the techniques of tempering chocolate for the food service industry. The students will also have the opportunity to learn the basics of artistic bakery design using such things as yeast bread, pastillage, sugar casting and pulling, and marzipan. Safe operation of bakery equipment will be explored and followed, as well as the basic principles of sanitation and safety.
Prerequisites: PAS-100

PHI150 - Introduction to Philosophy Credits: 3
An introduction to an in-depth practicum involving problem-solving, decision­making and choice-making techniques which enable the systematic study of life and the universe in terms of which every element of human experience can be interpreted.

PHI151 - Introduction to Ethics Credits: 3
An in-depth, conceptual analysis of ethical systems and ethical principles by which people govern their lives, with a determination of how such concepts realistically improve 'the human condition', promote 'happiness' and lead to attain­ment of'the good life'.

PHI152 - Life, Death and Dying Credits: 3
Presents and interprets philosophical views regarding life guidance systems and the cul minating aspects of living. Synthesizes the psychological impact of death upon humans, and surveys the chronology of religious attitudes and beliefs about death and life.

PHY101 - Introduction to Physical Science I Credits: 3
Historical development and significance of major concepts and theories with emphasis on the nature of physical science and its role in modern life; stresses elements of physics and chemistry with topics from organic chemistry and modern physics also included. Intended for students in non-technical fields.

PHY102 - Earth-Space Science (Introduction to Physical Science II) Credits: 3
This course is a broad and nonquantative survey at the introductory level of topics in astronomy and geology. Major topics included are the solar system, na­ture of the universe as a whole, and finally to a focus on the earth itself. You will enjoy learning about mountain building, volcanoes, earthquakes, rock, minerals, with a special emphasis placed on local geology.

PHY103 - Physics for the Trade Technologies Credits: 3
A physics course designed for students enrolled in industrial trade curricula. It is designed to emphasize basic physical concepts as applied to industrial/technical fields and to use these applications to improve the physics and mathematics com­petence of the student.

PHY111 - Descriptive Astronomy Credits: 3
An introductory course in Astronomy covering the solar system, stars, galaxies, light and astronomical instruments, time, celestial mechanics and cosmology. Pos­sibilities and limitations of modern space exploration are discussed.

PHY121 - Technical Physics Credits: 4
Introduction to mechanics; statics, kinematics, dynamics, work, energy, power, momentum, rotational kinematics, simple machines. Properties of materials. Heat; calorimetry, heat transfer, the gas laws. Introduction to light, sound and electric circuits.
Prerequisite: MAT 111 or concurrent enrollment therein, or equivalent.

PHY123 - Technical Physics I Credits: 4
The course is designed as the first semester of a two-course sequence to provide a thorough grounding in basic physical principles for the technology student. Covered in this first semester are topics including: mechanics, linear and rotational statistics, kinematics, dynamics, properties of material; density, mass, pressure, heat, work, energy, power, friction, momentum, simple machines.

PHY124 - Technical Physics II Credits: 4
The course is designed as the second semester of a two-course sequence to provide a thorough grounding in basic physical principles for the technology student. Covered in this second semester are topics including: vibratory motion, electricity and magnetism; fields, inductance, resistivity, capacitance, light and sound waves, reflection, interference, resonance, lenses, diffraction, fiber optics, polarization and Doppler effect; introduction to atomic and nuclear theory. Wherever possible, applications to technology are pointed out, but the emphasis of the course is on fundamental physics.
Prerequisite: PHY 123.

PHY131 - General Physics I Credits: 4
Covers mechanics and the thermal properties of matter. Topics include Newton's laws of motion, static equilibrium, work and energy, momentum, rotational motion, vibrations, and heat.
Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or permission of instructor.

PHY132 - General Physics II Credits: 4
Designed as a continuation of General Physics I. Topics include electricity, mag­netism, waves, sound, light, optics, and an introduction to modern physics.
Prerequisite: PHY 131 or permission of instructor.

PHY151 - Calculus-Based Physics I Credits: 4
A calculus-based introduction to mechanics and the termal properties of matter. Some of te topics covered are Newton's laws of motion, momentum, energy, oscillations, fluids, and heat.
Prerequisite: MAT 151

PHY152 - Calculus-Based Physics II Credits: 4
Designed continuation of Calculus-Based Physics I. Topics include electricity, magnetism, waves, sound, light, and optics.
Prerequisites: PHY 151 and MAT 251

HAC101 - Basic Heating and Cooling Technology Credits: 4
An introduction to the theory, design, installation and maintenance of the residential warm air heating/cooling systems and their associated components. This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamental concepts needed for progression into the heating and cooling courses.
Prerequisite: PLH 112. Corequisite: CEL 103.

HAC103 - Warm Air Heating & Air Conditioning Design/Installation Credits: 4
This course is designed to provide the theory, design and installation of a residential warm air heating and air conditioning system. Students are introduced to the requirements of sizing and selecting equipment, heat loss and cooling load calculations, controls, distribution systems and techniques used in the recovery of refrigerants.
Prerequisites: CEL 103, HAC 101, HAC 106.

HAC106 - Controls for Air Conditioning Credits: 3
This course will cover basic electricity, electronics theory and application. Controls used in both residential and light commercial HVAC. applications will be covered. Indoor comfort design and control strategy. The use of volt/multimeters will be covered in both theory and practical applications, along with troubleshooting methods. Reading and interpreting wiring diagrams, series, parallel, series/parallel control circuits will be explained. Various types of heating, air conditioning, ventilation and refrigeration controls will be explained, along with wiring demonstrations and individual and group lab projects.
Prerequisites: PLH 105, HAC 101, MAT 103 or permission of program coordinator.

PLH101 - Plumbing and Heating I Credits: 8
An introduction to the plumbing and heating trade: use of hand and power tools, safety procedures, materials and methods of drain, waste and vent systems, building and sewage system maintenance, pipefitting, mathematics of pipe fitting, water supply theory and installation, fixture installation, and the installation and repair of domestic hot water heating appliances, trouble shooting and repair of the plumbing system.
Concurrent with MAT 103 or permission of instructor.

PLH102 - Plumbing and Heating II Credits: 8
Heat loss calculation; design of steam and hot water heating systems; basic elec­tricity and electronics for heating controls; installation and repair of gas, oil, coal and electric heating systems; trouble shooting and efficiency checks for all types of heating systems and basic solar systems will be reviewed. Individual lab projects for heating systems will be assigned.
Prerequisites: MAT 103, PLH 101 or permission of instructor.

PLH105 - Controls for Heating Systems Credits: 4
This course will cover basic electricity/electronics theory and application, to include mathematical and practical solutions to series, parallel, and series-parallel electrical networks. Wiring from the main panel box to and including the boiler control wiring, and the electro/mechanical theory of the control circuit. Theory concerning the safety and comfort design of the control system, and applications to various fuel use. Practical demonstrations and individual lab projects on designing and controlling the heating system to achieve specific results will be taught. Use of various meters and system trouble-shooting is also included.
Prerequisite: CEL 103 or permission of instructor.

PLH108 - Blueprint Reading and Estimating for the Plumbing and Heating Technologies Credits: 3
Will provide the knowledge to develop the ability to interpret trade blueprints and to plan the installation of the required plumbing and heating equipment. The student will be able to interpret correctly all types of trade drawings, make isometric sketches of plumbing and heating installations, and to make a mechanical plan of piping and fixtures to scale, and estimate the cost of equipment installed in construction.

PLH112 - Basic Plumbing Systems Credits: 4
Introduction to plumbing and heating trade; use of hand and power tools. Theory and application of basic plumbing and heating systems, including identification of equipment and supplies, types of pipe, domestic water supply, drainage system, fixture connections and their installation. Individual laboratory projects are assigned with emphasis on safety requirements.

PLH114 - Advanced Plumbing Systems and Design 2 Lect., Credits: 4
Theory and application of drain, waste, and vent systems; building and sewage system installation and maintenance; pipe fitting, and installation and repair of domestic hot water heating appliances. Applied projects to coincide with PLH 108 Blueprint Reading and Estimating. Rough-in and final hook-up of all phases of plumbing technology. Individual lab projects.
Prerequisites: PLH 112 and MAT 103 or permission of instructor.

PLH118 - Basic Heating Technology Credits: 4
An introduction to heating technology from the earliest systems to present day equipment and design. Applied mathematical solutions for problems in the heat­ing field. Modern equipment used in specialized applications. Heat loss calcula­tions for various materials. Heat loss calculations for structures from residential to light commercial. Individual lab projects.
Prerequisite: MAT 103 or permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrent with PLH 120.

PLH120 - Heating Systems Design and Installations Credits: 4
Design of hydronic and steam systems. Sizing and calculation of pipe, heat distributing units, boiler, and all related equipment for the installation of the complete system. Series loop-single and multiple loop applications, and one pipe hydronic systems. Installation and trouble shooting of steam and hot water systems. Gas, oil, electric and coal fired systems to be included. Individual lab projects.
Prerequisite: MAT 103 or permission of instructor. Must be taken concurrent with PLH 118.

PLH128 - PLH Code Credits: 3
Study of the BOCA and National Standard Plumbing Code as it applies to the plumbing and heating trade.

PLH222 - Advanced Heating Technology Credits: 4
Hi efficiency hot air heating systems. Specialty heating applications and equip­ment. Residential and light commercial. Special projects and lab applications.
Prerequisite: PLH 120, MAT 103 or permission of instructor.

PLH224 - Mechanical (Heating) Code Credits: 3
A study of the BOCA National Mechanical Code as it applies to residential and light commercial buildings.
Prerequisite: PLH 118 or permission of instructor.

PLH230 - Internship Credits: 3
Students will work in the field to obtain a hands-on approach in the plumbing and heating technologies. Students will work with local qualified contractors in their area of specialization. Students will be required to maintain a 'C' average in all PLH courses to participate in this course. This may be completed on a cooperative education basis.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PLH232 - Internship Credits: 3
Students will work in the field to obtain a hands-on approach in the plumbing and heating technologies. Students will work with local qualified contractors in their area of specialization. Students will be required to maintain a 'C' average in all PLH courses to participate in this course. This may be completed on a cooperative education basis.
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

POS101 - American Government Credits: 3
An introduction to the study of Government and Politics, as well as the struc­ture and functions of the U.S. Government. Emphasis is given to the roles played by individuals within the U.S. Political System.

POS212 - State and Local Government Credits: 3
Emphasis is given to the setting, structure, and functions of state and local gov­ernments and the ways in which individual citizens can participate in the system.

PSY102 - Psychology: The Person The Workplace Credits: 3
The purpose of this course is to create a learning environment to facilitate the student's development of an understanding of the person and of human behavior, especially as it relates to the work environment. Success in the workplace, as in everyday relationships, depends on an understanding of the human nature including both the physiology and psychology of behavior.
*This course is designed for students in technology and terminal degree programs. It is not designed for transfer curriculums.

PSY103 - General Psychology Credits: 3
This course will introduce students to the study of psychology as the science of behavior and mental process. Theoretical perspectives, major concepts, and historical trends will be examined utilizing current research findings. Students will develop understanding of their own and other's behavior and mental processes. Throughout the course, critical thinking will be emphasized.

PSY200 - Research Methods for the Social Sciences Credits: 3
Research Methods for the Social Sciences is designed to introduce students to basic concepts and procedures used to conduct and evaluate research psychology. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills to be consumers and producers of research.
Prerequisites: MAT 107 and PSY 103.

PSY204 - CHD 208-Child Psychology Credits: 3
The study of human development and behavior from conception to adolescence. Subjects considered are the interdependence of the emotional, intellectual, social and physical development of the child.
Prerequisite: PSY 103.

PSY210 - Educational Psychology Credits: 3
The application of psychology to the classroom situation with emphasis on cog­nition, learning personality development, testing methods of teaching, motivation and individual differences.
Prerequisite: PSY 103.

PSY213 - Abnormal Psychology Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce the student to the broad and sometimes difficult field of abnormal behavior. It will uniquely utilize a multi-dimensional approach incorporating, but not limited to, the views from sociological, psychological and biological schools. The student will be introduced to descriptions of disorders, various casual perspectives and the management of behavior considered maladaptive to effective functioning in daily life. Major topics will include (but are not limited to): depression, schizophrenia, personality disorders, anxiety, age-related problems, prevention strategies, crime, and sexual deviations.
Prerequisite: PSY 103.

PSY217 - Developmental Psychology Credits: 3
Presentation of the theoretical models and basic principles of development throughout life. An emphasis will be placed on current research findings and their applications to actual situations.
Prerequisite: PSY 103.

PSY290 - Professional Development for Psychology Majors Credits: 1
This course is designed to prepare majors for pursuit of academic and career goals beyond the associate's degree. The course will provide students with an overview of the discipline of psychology and will emphasize the development of skills required for success in the major/field including research, communication, critical thinking and ethics.

RDG019 - Basic Reading Skills Credits: 3
Group and individualized instruction utilizing learning laboratory facilities and designed to improve reading ability of students who are not ready for DSP­020, College Reading and Study Skills. Emphasis is placed on comprehension, word-attack skills, vocabulary, multi-level cognitive skills, and reading rate. The Nelson-Denny Reading Test is administered at or before the beginning of the course to determine level of reading competency and at the end of the course to measure growth. An individual reading inventory is also administered at the end of the course. Study skills for college are included. This course does not apply toward graduation.

RDG020 - College Reading and Study Skills Credits: 3
Group and individualized instruction utilizing microcomputer software designed to improve reading ability of students on or above high and college levels. Emphasis is on comprehension, vocabulary and reading rate. Study skills for college including SQ3R method of study are included. Various other reading materials are also used. The Nelson-Denny Reading Test is administered at the beginning of the course to determine level of reading competency and at the end of the course to measure growth. Accuplacer testing results will also be used. This course does not apply toward graduation.
Prerequisite: RDG 019 or placement by exam.

RDG120 - Reading for Comprehension and Speed Credits: 3
Designed to improve reading skills. Attention is given to concentration, comprehension, vocabulary, and reading rate. This course is designed for the student already competent in reading. The course focuses on acceleration reading rate with maintenance of adequate comprehension. In addition, the student learns to adjust reading rate to purpose and difficulty of materials and to employ skimming and scanning techniques where appropriate. Recognition of organization patterns and development of reading vocabulary are stressed as aids to comprehension. Group and individual instruction utilizes learning laboratory facilities and computers. Various guides and reading materials are used as well as EDL QUANTUM Reading Series Software. The Nelson-Denny Reading Test is administered at the beginning of the course to determine level of reading competency and at the end of the course to measure growth.

RET107 - Real Estate Law Credits: 3
A course fundamental in design to acquaint the student with the laws involved in the practice of real estate with emphasis on the laws of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Studies in the purpose of the law, rights of persons in real estate, the concept of private property in relation to the government, types of property, interest in property, restrictions, liens, and incumbrances, instruments used, Penn­sylvania Real Estate Brokers Act and the rules and regulations. (Spring only)

RTT105 - Orientation to Respiratory Therapy Credits: 2
This course is designed to orient the student to Respiratory Therapy as an allied health career. The unique characteristics of health care delivery and the special at­tributes of Respiratory Therapy as an integral part of that delivery system demand that future practitioners develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes characteristic of their profession. The course combines classroom discussion with clinical obser­vation and various modes of independent study utilizing assigned text readings, printed workbooks, and audiovisual material.
Prerequisites: Acceptance into program; Documentation of Health Examination and Testing.
Corequisite: RTT 111.

RTT111 - Fundamentals of Respiratory Therapy I Credits: 5
RTT 111 is the first course in the fundamentals of respiratory therapy. The safe and effective delivery of respiratory care in the clinical setting is dependent upon the respiratory care practitioner's knowledge of and ability to apply certain key concepts of the physical and life sciences. This course is designed to provide the student with the scientific-rational knowledge and skills prerequisite to the competent delivery of quality respiratory care. RTT 111 combines classroom (didactic) instruction with laboratory demonstration and experimentation, and various modes of independent study utilizing assigned text readings, printed workbooks, and audiovisual material.
Prerequisites: CHE w lab, MAT 101 or 105, BIO 135. Corequisites: RTT 105, BIO 136, EMS 207, ENG 101.

RTT112 - Fundamentals of Respiratory Therapy II Credits: 6
RTT 112 is the second course of study in the fundamentals of respiratory care. This course is designed to assist the student in mastering the skills necessary to provide competent, effective, and safe general and non-acute respiratory care in a variety of clinical settings. The course combines classroom (didactic) instruction, laboratory demonstration, experimentation, and practice with clinical instruction and the application of the basic therapeutic modalities employed in contemporary respiratory care. Both the philosophy of the program and the scope of content mandate an extensive independent study commitment which relies heavily on assigned text readings, self-instructional material, and audiovisual materials. As with all successive courses in the Respiratory Therapy Program, emphasis will be placed upon utilizing classroom knowledge and skills to develop and expand clinical expertise.
Prerequisites: RTT 105, RTT 111, BIO 136, EMS 207, ENG 101. Corequisites: RTT 150, BIO 251, PSY 103.

RTT121 - Applications and Procedures of Respiratory Therapy I Credits: 3
RTT 121 is the first course in the application and procedures of respiratory care. This course is designed to assist the student in applying and refining those skills that the student has previously been exposed and additionally facilitate the development of new clinical skills prerequisite to the safe and effective practice of general and subacute respiratory care. Special emphasis will be given to the pathophysiological basis of respiratory insufficiency and the formulation and de­velopment of comprehensive respiratory care plans which apply both the student's knowledge of altered function and his/her ability to specify desired therapeutic outcomes and their corresponding modes of treatment. The course combines class­room (didactic) instruction with clinical application of the basic therapeutic mo­dalities employed in contemporary respiratory care. As with all successive courses in the Respiratory Therapy Program, emphasis will be placed upon utilizing class­room knowledge and skills as the basis for developing clinical competence.
Prerequisites: RTT 112, RTT 150, BIO 251, PSY 103. Corequisite: RTT 225.

RTT131 - Clinical Practicum I Credits: 4
This course is the student's first clinical practicum in respiratory therapy. This course is designed to provide the student with a practical basis to apply, refine, and demonstrate mastery of respiratory care in general and subacute medical and surgical units; its purpose also is the establishment of performance expecta­tions not unlike those encountered as a graduate practitioner on the job. The course combines classroom (didactic) instruction with extensive clinical application and refinement of skills learned in the program to date. Clinical application and re­finement will be realized by assignment to several different clinical sites and day and evening shifts.
Prerequisites: RTT 121, RTT 225.

RTT150 - Respiratory Therapy Pharmacology Credits: 2
This one-semester course deals with the properties and effects of drugs. This course is designed to provide basic knowledge of medication theory and application with an emphasis on drugs administered by the respiratory care practitioner via the aerosol route. The course consists solely of classroom (didactic) instruction. Both the philosophy of the program and the scope of content mandate an extensive independent study commitment which relies heavily on assigned text readings, self-instructional material, and audiovisual materials. As with all successive course in the Respiratory Therapy Program, emphasis will be placed upon utilizing classroom knowledge and skills to develop and expand clinical expertise.
Prerequisites: RTT 105, RTT 111, BIO 136, EMS 207, ENG 101. Corequisites: RTT 112, BIO 251, PSY 103.

RTT222 - Applications and Procedures of Respiratory Therapy II Credits: 5
RTT 222 is the second course in the application and procedures of respiratory care. This course is designed to assist the student in developing those skills neces­sary for the safe and effective practice of intensive respiratory care. Special empha­sis will be given to the pathophysiological basis of respiratory failure and the for­mulation and development of comprehensive respiratory care plans which apply both the student's knowledge of respiratory failure and his/her ability to specify desired therapeutic outcomes and their corresponding modes of treatment. The course combines classroom (didactic) instruction, laboratory demonstration, ex­perimentation, and practice with clinical instruction and the application of the ad­vanced therapeutic modalities employed in contemporary intensive respiratory care. As with all successive courses in the Respiratory Therapy Program, emphasis will be placed upon utilizing classroom knowledge and skills as the basis for develop­ing clinical expertise.
Prerequisite: RTT 131. Corequisites: PHY 131, SOC 215, SPE 210.

RTT225 - Pulmonary Function Credits: 3
This course is the student's introductory didactic/laboratory course of study in pulmonary function; principles and skills learned in this course will be applied during the remainder of the course of study. This course is designed to assist the student in understanding and correctly utilizing the concepts and applications of pulmonary function testing. The course combines classroom (didactic) instruction with laboratory demonstration, experimentation, and practice. Both the philosophy of the program and the scope of the content mandate an extensive independent study commitment which relies heavily on assigned text readings, self-instructional material, and audiovisual materials. As with all successive course in the Respiratory Therapy Program, emphasis will be placed upon utilizing classroom knowledge and skills to develop and expand clinical expertise, although actual clinical experience in pulmonary function testing will not be realized until Clinical Practicum II (RTT 232).
Prerequisites: RTT 112, RTT 150, BIO 251, PSY 103.
Corequisite: RTT 121

RTT226 - Neonatal and Pediatric Respiratory Care Credits: 2
This course of study dealing with the delivery of respiratory care to infants and children. This course is designed to assist the student in developing those skills necessary for the safe and effective practice of neonatal and pediatric respiratory care in both critical care and non-critical care settings. Special emphasis will be given to the pathophysiological basis of cardio-pulmonary dysfunction in newborns and children, and the development of comprehensive respiratory care plans which apply both the student's knowledge of neonatal and pediatric cardiopulmonary dysfunction and his/her ability to specify desired therapeutic outcomes and their corresponding modes of treatment. The course consists solely of classroom (didactic) instruction, with clinical instruction and application occurring during Clinical Practicum II (RTT 232) when the student completes a one-week clinical rotation at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville. As with all courses in the Respiratory Therapy Program, emphasis will be placed upon utilizing classroom knowledge and skills as the basis for developing clinical expertise.
Prerequisite: RTT 131.
Corequisites: PHY 101 or 131, SOC 101, SPE 210.

RTT232 - Clinical Practicum II Credits: 12
RTT 232 is the second clinical practicum in respiratory therapy; as the last sequenced course in the program of study at Luzerne County Community College, it represents the culmination of the student's experience and (upon its completion) marks the beginning of the student's career as a respiratory therapist. The fundamental principle underlying the structured full- time clinical rotations of RTT 232 is the integral relationship between work experience and clinical experience; only by gain ing broad experience and exhibiting skills mastery in a diversity of situations can the student be expected to demonstrate the full range of competencies now required of the entry level respiratory care practitioner. This course differs from the previous clinical practicum in its development and confirmation of the specialized skills and functions of the respiratory therapist. Because the evolving role of the entry level respiratory care practitioner demands advanced competencies in special areas of therapeutics (adult, pediatric, and neonatal intensive care) and diagnostics (blood gas analysis and pulmonary function testing), the rotation schedule for RTT 232 includes appropriate emphasis on the development and mastery of such skills: additional opportunities include exposure to cardiovascular testing and evaluation, anesthesiology, pulmonary medicine, education, and administration and accountability in the delivery of respiratory care.
Prerequisites: RTT 222, PHY 101 or 131, SOC 215, SPE 210.

SOC101 - Principles of Sociology Credits: 3
The course is designed to introduce the student to the unique perspective of the sociologist. Students will learn about the history of the field, research methods, culture, stratification, deviance, social psychology and various other areas. This course lays the theoretical and conceptual framework for other sociology courses. (Formerly SOC 215. Students cannot get credits for taking both courses.)

SOC103 - Introduction to Women's Studies Credits: 3
The course focuses on women's experiences, past and present, in the worlds of family, work, education, health, religion, the media and the legal system. Students explore and discuss women's choices and challenges in American society. Because women's contributions have often been ignored or dismissed, Introduction to Women's Studies highlights women's many and varied accomplishments.

SOC110 - Issues in American Diversity Credits: 3
This course will explore the pluralism of American society as expressed in ethnic, racial, religious, class, gender, and cultural diversity. In addition, human diversity expressed in sexual orientation, age, educational level, and ability will be addressed. Personal narratives as well as theory will be presented in order to illustrate the experience and realities of living in a diverse society. The historical antecedents and current status of pluralism in the United States will be examined. Ex­isting societal systems of power, privilege, and equity will be discussed. The mechanisms of social change will also be discussed. (Formerly SOC 225).

SOC216 - Contemporary Social Issues Credits: 3
We live in an era of technology that can set a person on the moon or replace human tissue with an adequate substitute. In spite of these remarkable technological achievements, social problems still baffle us. Solutions for these problems not only escape us, but the problem itself is often beyond an adequate definition.

SOC217 - The Family Credits: 3
A study of the family as an institution in relation to the society in which it functions. The course examines the family in light of current research, statistics and issues. It explores the political, social, economic, and biological forces which influence and change families, as well as the effect of families on these forces.

SOC218 - Cultural Anthropology Credits: 3
Faces of Culture - Studies of Cultural Anthropology is a one-semester college level course in introductory anthropology. The course features dramatic and unique footage from around the world. It includes cultures from all continents, the major human subsistence patterns and begins at the start of human history - finishing at the present. The course focuses on the premise that every society is based on an integral culture which satisfies human needs and facilitates survival. The course also explores the ways in which our own culture fits into the broad range of human possibilities.

SOC219 - Introduction to Gerontology Credits: 3
This course provides an understanding of the process of aging, old age as a stage of life, and the impact of aging in society.

SOC299 - Honors Colloquia Credits: 1
The Honors Colloquia are designed to provide an in-depth exploration in a specific area of interest through an interdisciplinary approach. Topic will reflect current and historical people, events, issues and trends. Students must complete three Honors Colloquia courses to fulfill the requirements for graduation in the Honors program.

SPE125 - Fundamentals of Speech Credits: 3
A course designed to develop understanding and application of the concepts of effective speech communication in the collective audience situation. Intensive participation in a variety of speech situations which include both formal and informal presentation technique (i.e., extemporaneous and impromptu speech methods) and interaction in large and small groups provide the student with practical experience based on the principles of effective speech communication developed throughout the course.

SPE150 - Oral Interpretation Credits: 3
An attempt at developing critical appreciation of prose and poetry and the ability to communicate that appreciation to others through oral reading. This course is of particular value to those in elementary education programs and those who plan to teach English at any level.

SPE200 - Group Discussion Credits: 3
The role of discussion in a democratic society as a problem-solving technique will be stressed. Students will be asked to prepare, organize, and conduct small group discussions which will be evaluated by the instructor and fellow classmates. The techniques of leadership, participation, and listening will be studied and practiced. The responsibility of the speaker for good speech techniques will be emphasized.

SPE210 - Introduction to Interpersonal Communication Credits: 3
Designed to provide the student with an understanding of the communication process through an examination of the theories and practices of inter/intrapersonal communication. Attention is given to listening, small group communication, verbal and non-verbal communication, conflict resolution, communication apprehension, and relationship building. Emphasis is placed on human interaction as a means of examining individual and group values and belief systems as they pertain to questions of diversity and multiculturalism, gender communication, workforce issues, etc. A wide variety of in-class activities provides the student with opportunities to experiment with personal communicative style and to evaluate his/her strengths and weaknesses.

SPE226 - Advanced Speech Credits: 3
Designed to give the student familiarity with and practice in the principles of logical reasoning and formal discourse; practice is provided in the principles of public speaking, special-occasion speaking, persuasive speaking, lecturing and other related areas of public address.
Prerequisite: SPE 125.

SUR101 - Surgical Room Technology I Credits: 10
Offers students class and supervised practice experiences that will enable them to develop the beginning skills needed to assist surgeons, anesthesiologists and nurses in the care of the patient undergoing surgery and in the overall management of the operation room facility.

SUR102 - Basic Surgical Interventions Credits: 10
Addresses the fundamentals of multiple surgical disciplines, relative to anatomy and physiology, pathology, and surgical intervention. Focuses upon the role of the Surgical Technologist in the planning, preparation, and execution of surgical techniques, as related to equipment and instrumentation, patient and health care provided safety, expected surgical outcomes, and potential complications. Includes classroom, laboratory, and supervised clinical instruction.
Prerequisite: SUR 101.

SUR103 - Complex Surgical Interventions Credits: 5
Addresses the role of the Surgical Technologist in planning, preparing, and executing complex techniques related to high-acuity, and technologically advanced surgical modalities. Includes classroom and supervised clinical rotations.
Prerequisite: SUR 102.

SUR104 - Advanced Topics for Surgical Technology Credits: 5
Develops a broader knowledge of various aspects of Surgical Technology. Focuses on sterile processing, laser technology, electrosurgical devices, the use of robotics and computers, and cutting-edge technologies utilized in the modern Surgical Suite. Includes classroom and supervised clinical experiences.
Prerequisite: SUR 103.

SUR105 - Surgical Pathology Credits: 3
This course will provide the student in surgical technology an opportunity to study alterations in body tissues removed by surgical intervention.
Prerequisites: BIO 135, 136, 251. Presently attending SUR course or graduate of an SUR Program, or permission of the Dean.

SUR106 - Pharmacology for Surgical Technology Credits: 3
Prepares the Surgical Technology student with a basic knowledge of the pharmacological agents utilized in conjunction with surgery. This information provides the Surgical Technologist with an ability to plan for and execute safe and effective practices while performing duties within the Surgical Suite.
Prerequisites: Presently attending SUR course or graduate of an SUR Program or permission of the Dean.

SUR107 - Applied Microbiology/Infection Control Practices and Procedures for Health Credits: 3
Introduces students to basic application of microbiology as it relates to healthcare. Focuses upon the principles of asepsis and provides an introduction to the function of surgical services personnel and health sciences personnel in planning, preparation and execution of principles asepsis and sterile technique. Emphasis is placed on disinfection and sterilization of instruments, equipment and supplies. Discussion includes healthcare provider?s role in infection control procedures, and fundamentals of Standard Precautions.

SET121 - Sustainable Energy Sources Credits: 3
The course is designed as an overview of the various technologies related to sustainable, renewable and green energy along with methods of increasing energy efficiency. Included will be issues related to wind, solar, geothermal, clean coal, biomass and other energy sources.

THR100 - Theatre Appreciation Credits: 3
This course is an introduction to the nature of theatre art and its representative dramatic genres, and the functions of the basic practices of the playwright, actor, director, and design technicians. The course is designed to help students bring critical thinking skills into their experience as theatergoers, and increase their appreciation and evaluation of theatre presentations. By reading, discussing, and seeing plays, students will have a better understanding of the various elements of theatre and theatre production as art.

THR101 - Acting I Credits: 3
This course is a beginning level study, practice, and execution of the fundamentals of acting. Emphasis is placed on the effective communication of ideas and emotions by a dramatic character to an audience through increased awareness of the mechanics of voice, body, emotion, and analysis as tools for the actor. Course content includes staging techniques, improvisation, theatre games, scenes, monologues, stage movement, and an introduction to the vocabulary of the theatre.

THR103 - Fundamentals of Stagecraft Credits: 3
This is a lecture and laboratory that emphasizes student understanding and involvement in the many phases of technical theatre production. The student will study the aesthetics and practical applications and principles of stage production. Class material introduces students to scenery, lighting, sound, and properties. Emphasis will be placed on set design and construction. Students will also be introduced to aspects of stage organization and management, stage activity, and other related stagecraft technologies. Rules of stage and tool safety will be learned and practiced.
Corequisites: THR 280, 281, 282.

THR105 - Script Analysis Credits: 3
This course studies plays, from page to stage, with emphasis on critical analysis of structure, genre, theme, style, character, language, dramatic event, and point of view of the actor, director, critic, and audience. Emphasis is placed upon the collaborative effort of the artists and technicians in the production process, and the development of basic skills of play analysis.

THR201 - Acting II Credits: 4
This course is a continuation of Acting I. This course refines student skills they developed in Acting I and continue to explore the acting process through readings, theatre attendance, and performance work. Emphasis is placed on character analysis through lecture, demonstration, improvisation, script analysis, movement, and scene projects. Students will also examine the role of imagination, perception, and creativity in performance.
Prerequisite: THR 101.

THR211 - History of Theatre I: Ancient Greece to the Restoration Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to a history of theatre of the Western canon from ancient times to the Restoration in England. Students will examine the physical theatre and methods of staging drama from the earliest records to the mid-17th century. Emphasis is placed on text analysis, author creativity, and the relationship of the theatre to the historical, political, and religious events of the times. It will also study various genre and themes popular and relevant to each period.

THR212 - Theatre History II Credits: 3
This course is designed to introduce students to a history of theatre of the Western canon from the English Restoration to the present, including genre such as: Comedy of Manners, Epic Theatre, Absurdism, and aspects of American Realism. Students will examine the physical theatre and methods of staging drama from the earliest records to the mid-17th Century. Emphasis is placed on text analysis, author creativity, and the relationship of the theatre to the historical, political, and religious events of the times. It will also study various genre and themes popular and relevant to each period.

THR280 - Lighting/Sound Practicum Credits: 3
This is a hands-on course, which gives students actual experience in preparation for play production in the art of lighting and sound. Emphasis is placed on introducing students to the fundamentals, techniques, and methods used to realize lighting and sound plots, with particular attention paid to the technical skills re- quired to prepare, set, and run lighting and sound equipment. Time required for initial lecture/classroom fundamentals will be determined by instructor with student. Students may acquire hours outside of college setting through local theatre productions, only with the prior approval of instructor and/or theatre coordinator.
Corequisite: THR 103

THR281 - Costume/Makeup Design Practicum Credits: 1
This is a hands-on course, which gives students actual experience in preparation for play production in the art of costuming and makeup. Students work with conceptions and practical applications of design, creation, and application techniques for the stage. Time required for initial lecture/ classroom fundamentals will be determined by instructor with student. Students may acquire hours outside of college setting through local theatre productions, only with the prior approval of instructor and/or theatre coordinator.
Corequisite: THR 103.

THR282 - Stage Management Practicum Credits: 1
This is a hands-on course, which gives students actual experience in preparation for play production in the art of the business of stage management. Students will learn and practice the role of stage manager in the theatre through projects and preparation for a theatrical production, from pre-production to auditions, and from first rehearsal through closing night and strike. Students may acquire hours outside of college setting through local theatre productions, only with the prior approval of instructor and/or theatre coordinator.
Corequisite: THR 103.

THR290 - Special Theatre Topics Credits: 3
A study of topics of special interest not extensively treated in regularly offered theatre courses. Topic to be determined by theatre coordinator and/or instructor to meet demands of student body. This course is intended to build on the knowledge and skills developed in the theatre curriculum, to include emphasis in, either dramatic literature, acting, or theatre technology. This course will meet require- ments for general education outcomes and will be designed to meet standards for transfer credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of chairperson.

THR291 - Independent Study: Theatre Credits: 3
Independent research, study, and/or performance under the direction of a faculty member or theatre coordinator. The project may be in any theatre area includ- ing performance, research, and technical theatre. The project requires the approval of a supervising faculty member and the coordinator of theatre curriculum. A paper is required.
Prerequisite: Entry-level course or per- mission of chairperson.

WEL100 - Introduction to Welding Credits: 3
Introduction to the welding industry, Basic shop safety, Types of employment in the welding industry, Electricity for welding, Welding heat sources (fuels and electricity, Measurement tools, Converting a print to a layout, types of Metals and Alloys metals and their weldability, Welding filler types

WEL102 - Introduction to Oxygen And Acetylene Welding (OAW) Credits: 3
Through lecture and hands on application, this course will cover the Oxygen and acetylene Welding, Cutting, Brazing, Plasma arc cutting; set up of the welding / cutting workstation; OAW filler metal classifications and base metals and joint criteria; filler wire selection and use based on metal types and thickness; the building of pads of weld beads with selected filler in various positions; basic OAW welds on selected weld joints and how visual inspection of welds are done. Within this process we will cover: Safety, Welding Terminology, Welding equipment, Joint Construction, Filler Selection, Welding and fit up Techniques. Practical knowledge of safety in the use and handling of equipment and compressed gases will be stressed.
Corequisites:WEL-100

WEL104 - Introduction to Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) Credits: 3
Through lecture and hands on application, this course will cover the Shielded Metal Arc Welding process (SMAW); set up of the SMAW workstation; SMAW electrode classifications and base metals and joint criteria; electrode selection and use based on metal types and thickness; the building of pads of weld beads with selected electrodes in various positions; basic SMAW welds on selected weld joints and how visual inspection of welds are done. Within this process we will cover: Safety, Welding Terminology, Welding equipment, Heat Settings, Joint Construction, Filler Selection, Welding and fit up Techniques.
Corequisites:WEL-100

WEL106 - Introduction to Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) Credits: 3
Through lecture and hands on application, this course will cover the Gas Metal Arc Welding process (GMAW); set up of the GMAW workstation; GMAW filler metal classifications and base metals and joint criteria; filler wire selection and use based on metal types and thickness; the building of pads of weld beads with selected filler in various positions; basic GMAW welds on selected weld joints and how visual inspection of welds are done. Within this process we will cover: Safety, Welding Terminology, Welding equipment, Heat Settings, Joint Construction, Filler Selection, Welding and fit up Techniques.
Corequisites:WEL-100

WEL108 - Introduction to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) Credits: 3
Through lecture and hands on application, this course will cover the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW); set up of the GTAW workstation; GTAW filler metal classifications and base metals and joint criteria; filler wire selection and use based on metal types and thickness; the building of pads of weld beads with selected filler in various positions; basic GTAW welds on selected weld joints and how visual inspection of welds are done. Within this process we will cover: Safety, Welding Terminology, Welding equipment, Heat Settings, Joint Construction, Filler Selection, Welding and fit up Techniques.
Corequisites:WEL-XXX